Without a doubt Frederick was the hardest-working ruler of his day, rivaled only by Joseph II of Austria.

Without a doubt Frederick was the hardest-working ruler of his day, rivaled only by Joseph II of Austria. Most mornings he rose at 5:00 AM, sometimes 4:00 AM, and worked until 5:00 PM, allowing the remainder of the day for rest and recreation, finally going to bed around midnight. Nothing got in the way of his work schedule or escaped his watchful eye. He created a Bureau of Accounts to supervise state finances and he was merciless on corruption to the point where he made Prussia the most efficient, honestly-run government in Europe, maybe the world. Frederick quickly restored the country's economy from the ruins of the Seven Years War, in part with his own frugal example--his household was run like an army barracks in comparison to France and Austria, which kept their extravagent courts at all times despite ruinous expense to the taxpayers.

Only the army was lavished with funds; it was rebuilt quickly after the war as Prussia's security against her greedy neighbors was essential. In addition to protecting from foreign aggressors, the army was Prussia's main police force and necessary to preserving law and order. Frederick also developed a unified legal code in place of the many regional ones; he got rid of unnecessary courts, made the penal code more humane, simplified legal procedure, and improved the requirements needed to serve as a judge. Capital punishment could not be handed out without the king's personal approval and all citizens convicted of a crime could appeal their sentence directly to him.

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What is he looking at?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      if only Katte were here.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      his sexy twink's steaming bussy

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Katte was older than Fred.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Katte was older than Fred.

        Why are gnomish historians obsessed with turning every historical figure into a homosexual?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Frederick is based. him being possibly gay is inconsequential.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It's not possible though

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              what's gayer than trying to defect to bongistan with your best "friend"

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >to bongistan
                truly most homosexual behavior

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          He very likely was gay. His father gave him an arranged bride but he had no interest in her (plus she was said to be "stupider than a pile of straw") and was upset at his extremely close companionship with a couple of soldiers.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >projecting your mental disorder onto historical figures

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              would his accomplishments be lessened for being gay?
              was Hadrian not a great emperor?

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Hadrian
                overrated fag

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Don't forget his

            >Fortune has it in for me; she is a woman, and I am not that way inclined

            Line.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              IIRC that phrase, originally written in French, can be translated in different ways with different meanings.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >muh garden gnomes and muh homosexuals

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          hadrian was a fag too
          infact, the only roman emperor who's faggishness is grossly exaggerated nowadays is Elagabalus, from whom we only have hostile sources (he was a syrian, and unpopular among the nobles. They lambasted him as a gay womanlike easterner and all the normal tropes) which retards nowadays take at face value to call him a trannie

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          [log in to view media]

          It's not possible though

          >projecting your mental disorder onto historical figures

          This is my version of Pascal's wager about the purported homosexuality of historical figures:
          >if he was not really a fag it would be slight to his memory to assume he was
          >if he was it doesn't really matter because he is long dead

          [log in to view media]

          Yes

          People complaining about “fags projecting their mental disorders onto historical figures” in a Frederick the Great thread is funny when Frederick himself did the exact same thing:
          >Don't you know your history?
          >You will find there glorious heroes,
          >Responding both actively and passively
          >To their lithe and obliging friends.
          >That was what Socrates got from Alcibiades
          >Who, by my faith, was not a gloomy Greek;
          >And just the same were Euryalus and Nisus.
          >How many more could I name? A great number,
          >Julius Caesar, about whom obscene tongues
          >Told he was the husband of all the Roman women,
          >When he was the wife of all the husbands.
          >But just leaf through Suetonius
          >And see how he deals with the Caesars.
          >They are all included on this list;
          >They all served the good god of Lampsacus.
          >And if profane examples aren't enough
          >For you, then let us shift our attack to the sacred:
          >This good Jesus, how do you think
          >He got John to sleep in his bed?
          >Can't you see he was his Ganymede?
          —‘Palladium' by Frederick the Great, 1748

          Anyway, people think this is some kind of “gnomish academic” thing, but we must remember that the disproportionate number of great homosexuals in history was noticed by for instance the fascist DH Lawrence, who said, “I should like to know why nearly every man that approaches greatness tends to homosexuality.” And similar sentiments were uttered by men as diverse as Benvenuto Cellini, Christopher Marlowe, Yukio Mishima, etc. Medieval Christian writers often complained about how otherwise virtuous men from antiquity were infected with the sin of sodomy. Nothing has softened my opinion toward homosexuals more than my reading of history and historical texts.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            we had one gay president and he was one of the worst we ever had

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >DH Lawrence, Benvenuto Cellini, Christopher Marlowe, Yukio Mishima
            all of them fags

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            When was the last time a great military man was a homosexual? Mad Dog "When you were partying I studied the blade-counterinsurgency tactics*" Mattis?

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >When was the last time a great military man was a homosexual?

              Zelensky

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Lord Kitchener, TE Lawrence

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Bernard Montgomery was rumored to be

                You can take the Brit out of the public school, but you can't take the public school out of the Brit...

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Reminds me of what Robert Graves said:
                >In English preparatory and public schools romance is necessarily homosexual. The opposite sex is despised and treated as something obscene. Many boys never recover from this perversion. For every one born homosexual, at least ten permanent pseudo-homosexuals are made by the public school system: nine of these ten as honourably chaste and sentimental as I was.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Bernard Montgomery was rumored to be

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          [log in to view media]

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            This is a HUGE cope
            Talking about the theban band:
            >composed of lovers and beloveds... The thebans' practice of intimacy from lovers,
            >TRUTH: he meant strong friendship
            Kek

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              I think its on purpose

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                i think it's a joke on brainlets
                some will repost it without actually reading what it says, pretty based whoever thought of it

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              You're not so smart huh?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A bed. It must have been exhausting. If I was king I'd probably get at least 9 hours of sleep every day.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I never get how one can stay functioning with an average of only 5 hours sleep.
        My mental capacity already deteriorates after a work week with an average sleep schedule of 7 hours and I need the weekend to recuperate. My father always held the belief that one essential feature of great men is that they can cope with extreme sleep deprivation.

        Voltaire was not gay, his mistress died at childbirth

        I think the anon means that Voltaire wrote about Frederick’s (purported) homosexual exploits. (the “he” is referencing Frederick, not Voltaire).

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    War-ravaged areas were rebuilt; Silesia was exempted from taxes for six months and reconstruction there proceeded apace. The swamps along the lower Oder were drained, allowing new areas to be brought under cultivation. Frederick worked to build industry and open technical schools to train skilled laborers. He tried to start a silk industry with imported Chinese mulberries, but the cool, rainy climate of northern Europe proved unsuitable for them. He encouraged mining in mineral-rich Silesia.

    Frederick abolished internal tariffs, built canals, expanded harbors, and built 30,000 miles of new roads. Foreign trade languished due to high tariffs on imports and restrictions on the export of strategic commodities. Taxes were heavy and commodities like sugar, tobacco, salt, and coffee were state monopolies. The king personally owned 1/3rd of Prussia's arable land. Nearly everything was taxed and Frederick worked to develop an airtight system that would prevent tax evasion. One British diplomat found that the people groaned under the oppressive weight of these taxes, but at Frederick's death the treasury had a surplus of 51,000,000 talers, a good 2.5x the state's annual revenues.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >He tried to start a silk industry with imported Chinese mulberries, but the cool, rainy climate of northern Europe proved unsuitable for them
      This was done in the American colonies as well. It was no more successful but the mulberries liked the climate of the eastern US better than that of Germany and are now an invasive weed--the fruit is currently in season but it's only okay.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    he was gay

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the bigger problem is that he refused to take one for the team and impregnate his wife to have a solid line of succession
      Gay kings are fine as long as they take care of the succession competently

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        He had relatives who could inherit the throne, meaning he could concentrate on the affairs of state,and not be troubled by a woman

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          yes but he did a shit job preparing those relatives for the crown. If a ruler does not leave a good succession, it does not matter how good that ruler actually is

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Unlike Catherine the Great who had a dark, paranoid last few years of her life, Frederick didn't live to see the French Revolution and the concept of the "enlightened autocrat" go up in a plume of smoke.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He was the first crown-head of Europe to recognize American independence

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        why didnt the french recognize it? was it because of the debt?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Surrender monkeys were scared of angering daddy England until American chads proved it was winnable at Saratoga

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      well we know Catherine was straight. she loved the dick to the point where she forced studly 25 year old army officers to service her when she was past 50

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This is my version of Pascal's wager about the purported homosexuality of historical figures:
    >if he was not really a fag it would be slight to his memory to assume he was
    >if he was it doesn't really matter because he is long dead

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      he most likely was a fag
      >his sister talked about him being too intimate with a page and his father punished him for it
      >his father was always punishing him for being sinful and not a real man
      >this incident

      what's gayer than trying to defect to bongistan with your best "friend"


      >he was a big friend with voltaire for all his life, voltaire published a book describing all the homosexual stuff he did, Frederick didn't care
      >never was attracted to any woman we know of, he was forced to marry one but divorced as soon as he could
      >always surrounded himself with exclusively male advisors and courtiers
      >had a collection of gay paintings
      >literally said "Fortune has it in for me; she is a woman, and I am not that way inclined.
      few of those would be normal

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Voltaire was not gay, his mistress died at childbirth

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          chid confirmed having the reading comprehension of a child

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Why would someone write about their gay sex life to another guy?

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              #
              People gossiping about others low lit mutt

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >It's a slight to a memory to propose someone might have been gay
      >It's not a slight to a memory to say someone was certainly straight

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yes.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Right, what's your point?

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    Ugh, that awful man

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    based homosexual

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    > Only the army was lavished with funds; it was rebuilt quickly after the war as Prussia's security against her greedy neighbors was essential
    Greedy neighbors wanting their shit back?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      shut up frog.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Workaholism is a gay trait btw. Better than the other gay trait too, which is alcoholism

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Whats a good biography an anon here would recommend on this cat?

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Frederick longed to be a writer as renowned as Voltaire, and he put to pen 30 volumes of history, poetry, military texts, philosophy, and correspondence, all in French. His poems were unremarkable and have not survived. He was a first-rate historian and penned a history of the Hohenzollern line early in his reign. Frederick claimed to be able to write history with perfect objectivity, for "I regard all men as ordinary" but gushed over the Great Elector Frederick William.

    His magnum opus was "L'histoire de mon temps", his memoirs. He encompassed science, literature, art, and philosophy in this monumental work. Frederick apologized for the ink he wasted on "all the idiots" with a crown on their head or a cassock on their shoulders but praised all the English and French philosophers of the preceding century for their blows at established religion. He hated the French state but loved its writers, and he compared Voltaire's Henriade above the Illiad. He loved Germany's architecture but ridiculed its language and literature as clumsy and stupid. He was half-apologetic for the invasion of Silesia and felt, based on everything he knew back in 1740, that it had been necessary for Prussia's security as a nation. He admitted he'd often blundered as a military commander but didn't care to record his flight at Mollwitz.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The dust had barely settled in the Seven Years War before Frederick sought to record his remembrances of it in "Historie de la guerre de Sept Ans." He admired his great foe Maria Theresa for her domestic policies but felt her foreign policy had been marred by great foolishness and arrogance. In between, he mourned the deaths of his mother and his beloved sister Wilhemine. Frederick concluded that those who do not know their history are condemned to repeat it, but history is almost always repeated, men being what they are. Even if we learned from our mistakes, he opined, there is always the element of random chance. Like Julius Caesar, he believed he was the best person to remember his own battles, and like Caesar, he avoided referring to himself in the third person.

    Frederick urged his successors to pay attention to Prussia's neighbors and be prepared for any hostile designs they had. The army had to be kept in a state of readiness, the state budget had to be balanced, and he believed France would come to grief over her reckless spending. Improving economic growth would bring more state revenues than tax increases. Although all religions were absurd fairy tales, Frederick advocated tolerance as long as they were peaceful and didn't undermine the stability of the state. The king's power should be absolute, but he should never put his personal needs above those of the state. Because Prussia was small and lacked easily defensible borders, it needed to gain more secure ones, possibly by annexation of Swedish Pomerania, Saxony, and western Poland.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The next king of Prussia should be schooled by intellectuals, not clergy, for "they will fill his head with superstitions and seek to convert him into a docile servant of the church." As proof of this, Frederick remarked that most European rulers were empty-headed lightweights save for Maria Theresa and Charles Emanuel II of Sardinia. He wrote this when Elizabeth was Russian empress; a later edition of his "Testament", made after Catherine was in power, was kinder, and he believed Russia was a "great and feared power" in the making.

    He fretted that his nephew and heir Frederick William II couldn't handle the responsibilities of state. Frederick himself, in his final decade, was aging and becoming more irritable; the tolerant attitudes of his earlier years faded. The high degree of press freedom he'd once allowed faded, and Lessing wrote to Nikolai in 1769, "In [Prussia], 'freedom' consists of the right to disparage religion using whatever vitriolic language you wish, but speak out against despotism and exploitation, and you shall see what the most servile land in Europe today is." Herder loathed his native country, and Winckelmann recoiled at the thought of "that despotic land." Goethe visited Berlin in 1778 and was surprised at the lack of affection the people had for the old king. Yet they could not help but respect a man who'd hardly missed a day of work in 45 years.

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Frederick was 66 that year and feeling tired. His ailments worsened, no doubt aggravated by his busy schedule, lack of sleep, and lots of spicy food. While reviewing troops near Breslau in August, he was soaked by a rain storm, caught a chill, and was never right again after that. In June 1786, the 74 year old king summoned Dr. Zimmerman from Hanover. Frederick disdained the medicines the doctor prescribed for him, preferring to medicate himself with art and literature instead. He was suffering from dropsy and the doctors made cuts with unsterilized instruments to relieve the swelling. They became infected. Frederick developed pneumonia and expired on the afternoon of August 17.

    He requested burial near his dogs and his favorite horse; this request was ignored and he was laid to rest next to his father in the Garrison Church of Potsdam. Twenty years later, when Napoleon had crushed the Prussian army at Jena, he visited Frederick's tomb and remarked reverently, "If he were still alive we wouldn't be here."

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Napoleon
      Frederick was a good general but he wasn't actually a great general. Any of Napoleon's marshals would have bested him if not fucking dabbed all over him.
      His younger and even gayer brother was actually a better general funnily enough.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Napoleon himself obviously disagreed.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It’s pretty common for great generals to pay respects to their elders and claim inferiority to them when it’s obviously not true. Frederick fought in the same fashion as his predecessors, Napoleonic strategy was actually innovative instead of being good execution of existing doctrine. It’s like comparing Philip II of Macedon to Alexander, while Alexander was brilliant he was simply a good tactician while Philip was an innovator who revolutionized hellenic warfare.

          So if you just teleported Frederick the Great to Napoleonic Prussia and made him king he would get raped by Napoleon. That isn’t to say he wouldn’t adapt and might beat him at his own game, but in the first war Frederick will lose.

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    GO FRED GO

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Archillies was gay as well

    Gay sex, the best sex a man can get

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How the fuck did he live on 5 hours of sleep a night?

  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >the hardest-working ruler of his day
    >12-13 hours of work and 7 hours of leisure per day
    I have had a more grueling work schedule than this before.

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