Why did this garbage language catch on?

Why did this garbage language catch on?

  1. 1 week ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      what is the alternative then?

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >mobile apps
      That's R*act, not JS.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        React is still JS no matter how you cut it, retard.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          It just makes me seethe that there is no simple solution for cross platform for mobile and desktop like Electron. There isn't even an Electron alternative for mobile. I'm not going to use React.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            Mobiles shouldn't exist anyways.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            https://github.com/alifcommunity/webui
            or flutter/dart which does what you asked

            • 1 week ago
              Anonymous

              That's literally just electron from another vendor, retard.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            Tauri

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            >There isn't even an Electron alternative for mobile

            you can make hybrid apps with plain js using cordova or capacitor. It's just like a fancy webview packaged as an app
            https://capacitorjs.com/

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        you can make hybrid apps with plain js using cordova or capacitor. It's just like a fancy webview packaged as an app
        https://capacitorjs.com/

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >Enjoy your coffee sirs.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Machine Learning? I have never seen someone use JS for that. Everyone uses Python (PyTorch, Tensorflow) for that.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        I think some enterprise apps/systems use JS for task automation with few ML methods bundled with them

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah, they advertise it as ML but they really mean a linear regression at best. Maybe, if they're extra fancy, there was a random forest, but even that's rare. Also the ML isn't "done" in js in this case, it's just loaded up in a js runtime.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            True, but that doesn't make any difference for "business analysts" as long as they can tell their managers they've implemented "ML-based solution"

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        there's a js version of tensorflow. I'm not sure who uses it but I guess a fair few people use it for google to maintain it. Though way more people use python
        https://www.tensorflow.org/js
        it runs in the browser though too so I guess if you're making a client side ML app then you pretty much have to use js, or wasm i suppose

  2. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    it's useful

  3. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Webdev is the entry gateway to programming so people babyduck to JS.

  4. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    I'm serious: it's because the /ilovescience/ crowd found out that NASA uses it:

    https://universemagazine.com/en/heart-of-james-webb-nasa-revealed-the-main-secret-of-the-telescope/

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      this cannot be real, why would they do that?
      obviously this is not why JS is so big today lol

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Nope. The telescope apparently has a JS API that will call lower level functionality, and it appears to be available for scientists and the like to write simple scripts to get data from the telescope. It doesn't just "run on javascript" you simpleton.

      “ 3.1. Event-driven Operations
      The JWST science operations will be driven by ASCII (instead of binary command blocks) on-board scripts, written in a customized version of JavaScript. The script interpreter is run by the flight software, which is written in C++. The flight software operates the spacecraft and the science instruments.”

      and in section 3.5, sounds like javascript just has an API to lower level system functions:

      “ ScriptEase JavaScript allows for a modular design flow, where on-board scripts call lower-level scripts that are defined as functions.”

  5. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    It was revolutionary in the late-90's through early 2000's. It caught on in a very formative time for the internet and has been grandfathered in ever since.

    JS, especially modern JS, isn't really that bad of a language in itself but the runtime is absolute dogshit and the zeitgeist around it is a war crime.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >the runtime is absolute dogshit
      What do you mean? JS is faster than ever thanks to the runtime.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        >no mutlithreading
        >module system is a nightmare
        >everything is waterfall interpreted
        >still slow

        among other issues

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          >>no mutlithreading
          you can use workers to run multiple threads. There's workers in node.js too, or clusters
          >module system is a nightmare
          typescript modules are easy, i'ts just import/export and you don't need to change package.json, but the others aren't so good
          >still slow
          it's pretty fast really. Websites are usually slow because they're poorly optimized. like have unused bundled code or huge uncompressed images or run on a low power server etc. It's not often because javascript is slowing things down

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >It was revolutionary in the late-90's
      No, but it happened to be there in a convenient spot

  6. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    I still don't understand what the fuck is prototype inheritance useful for.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Not carrying around all useless methods with every object

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        This reminds me of a use case of dynamic scoping.

        methods are shared across multiple instances of a class which saves memory

        This is an implementation thing, I'm looking for programming use case things, but I seriously doubt that there is anything really deep about them. At best, it could be used to implement dynamical scoping and it could be useful with the DOM and nested widgets, it's the only thing that make sense.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      methods are shared across multiple instances of a class which saves memory

  7. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    nothing else was added to web browsers.

  8. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Basically its Emergent Phenomena

    The language was adequate enough to achieve stuff in the browser BUT loose enough that it didnt scare all the newbies to the internet off by allowing totally dysfunctional constructs yet still keep on running.

    It out competed every other solution because it spread the fastest because of the above factors.

    If it was too terse and too strict, its uptake would not have happened as it did.

    Successful technologies are not necessarily the best technologies. Its irrelevant if something is the best fit. Its more important that its taken up the fastest to outcompete better solutions.

  9. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    It didn't "catch on", it was forced because it was the only option, then as people started using it, the only recognized option.

  10. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    It actually makes sense.
    javascript was half assed in a few days and became the language of the browser because of corporate bureaucracy
    The browser and the web were designed with interop at the center.
    As a result of this and multiple other factors, the web became the main platform for everything.
    Like it or not, the browser is the new kernel and javascript is the new assembly

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      the idea of ruthless backwards compat for the web is what allowed it to succeed by mere process of elimination. where each decision made by a language alienates developers further each time, the fact that you could write something and expect it to work 10 years later means you not only have the developers and products made today, but also the ones made 10 years ago.
      this has a huge leverage on its market share because it serves as the foundational userbase that allows it to more easily reach (and less likely to lose) critical mass. if we had a web 10 or web 11 by now, fagmen would have made their own http alternatives long ago that gave them full control over their "ecosystem".

  11. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    it’s literally a phase. i’ve outgrown it now. i’m doing java, a real programming language, like an adult

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      good morning sir

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        good morning sir
        i heart java

  12. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    because it is the language that is dominating the situation sir isn't it

  13. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Low point of entry is the reason why JS, Python and PHP dominate programming language landscape

  14. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    It's just like how C became popular: right place, right time

  15. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Return to tradition.
    Embrace ActionScript 2.0.

  16. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    right place at the right time, it was the only universal way to make web sites do dynamic things, and the web took off massively
    laziness and powerful hardware let it spill over to non-web areas

  17. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Steve Jobs is a big reason. By explicitly refusing to allow flash on iphone, he pushed websites away from flash. Java was always a pain in the ass. The only real option for cross platform interactive websites became JavaScript.
    The whole thing is basically an accident of history. No one really wanted JavaScript to be the everything language but it was the only one that worked everywhere.
    Web Assembly will theoretically fix this over time. But now we have a whole new problem of needing to sandbox websites, and endless vulnerabilities popping up because browsers are now virtual machines that spontaneously run arbitrary code from any page they load. It's ridiculous that web developers abandoned the old best practice of having a website work without JS. even LULZ requires JS, mostly only because it reduces server load with client side rendering

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      JS is fine when used as intended, like LULZ's use is perfectly fine
      the issue is that the fact you /can/ make whole-ass applications out of it, people did

  18. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Javascript is comfy.
    Unfortunately, it's being used for evil.

  19. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    for c, you need iq. for python, you need a good laptop/pc. JS can run on weakest & cheapest pc third worlders can afford.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Js isn't lighter than python

  20. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Internet Explorer started shipping its own garbage version of it.

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