Who taught you how to wrench?

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Me

    My dad was a carpenter and taught me woodworking so I wasn’t a total dolt but the metal raft and mechanics were all me and a 4 year engineering degree

  2. 3 months ago
    Panda5

    I did.
    My father has never been good with mechanics.
    I learned through trial-and-error.
    Whoops, I stripped the head off of the bolt holding my downpipe to my turbo because it was warm and slighly softened.
    Whoops, using a 2-foot breaker bar to get the main crankshaft bolt complelely sheared the head off!
    You use shop manuals for your car, google, and learning from experience. Getting a mech engineering degree and being a machinist for my Formula SAE team didn't hurt.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Whoops, using a 2-foot breaker bar to get the main crankshaft bolt complelely sheared the head off!
      in my case it was trying to twist a stuck caliper bleeder nipple loose instead of just having the wrench sit on it, and then hammering the end.

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    my first car.

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Look up occupational centers in your area. They offer mechanic shop classes that you can take as early as high school. + youtube, and the now defunct forums.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I don't have that

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    The Air Force.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I wasn't a mechanic in the military, but I hung out at the base DIY mechanic shop a few nights a week. So many guys have cool cars. People get to know each other and help each other out. It's really comfy.

      • 3 months ago
        Panda5

        >the base DIY mechanic shop
        Base auto hobby shops are the best. Lots of chill people and you get a 4-point lift (AND tools!) for $3-5/hr.
        I'm still pissed that one guy wouldn't sell me the Celica All-Trac he had sitting behind the local base hobby shop for over a year.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Same plus myself before, during and after along with welding and machinist classes then working at the local CC. Fixing military aircraft beats the shit out of fixing cars for the public (and aircraft are easier to work on, I wish automakers had similar wiring).

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >aircraft are easier to work on
        Because they are made to be able to fix. Whereas cars are made for you to buy a new one.

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    My dad's a mechanic and I taught myself, his advice was always shortcuts which burned me all I take the extra 5,10,15 minutes or the extra hour and do it correctly so it's not nagger rigged

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Similar to me. Self-taught, while father is a parts changer. I'd prefer if he could chill with a beer instead of giving bad advice.
      >Car misfires
      >"Dirt in your carb, son. Stop poking with the ignition."

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Myself. Dad died when I was three.

        Glad I didn't have to deal with this shit as much, Mom dated a ex-navy nuke engineer who'd fucking say the same stupid shit on occasion; telling me I should check shit that didn't exist on the car.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >ex-navy nuke engineer who'd fucking say the same stupid shit on occasion; telling me I should check shit that didn't exist on the car.
          Kek. Bought a clapped out Volvo from a similar fellow. Hadn't changed the timing belt or engine oil in twenty years, but claimed it was regularly serviced.

          Noone, i don't care about it. Most issues can be fixed using tutorials. Shit that is hard to fix on your own would is better outsourced than done on your own (given that your time costs more than the dealer/independent shop bill).

          This thread is obviously not for you. Wrenching on interesting cars is part of the hobby.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Interesting cars – yeah, sure, i would, but again, there are things that you have to have a lot of experience to actually do well. My project car? Same applies.
            My daily? Eh.

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Buying a used volkswagen with over 100,000 miles. I think I've had every part of this car apart.

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    My dad, and then self taught. My dad taught me the basics, and then from there I got a Miata, tore it down, and rebuilt it while he laughed at me for being an idiot. Pretty comfy, I miss those days

  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Selftaught. Bought my first moped at the age of 13, and started from there.

    I've gotten pointers and help from friends and acquaintances, but generally its been a solo-journey of banging my head against stuff, an ever-growing arsenal of tools, and YouTube-guides

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous
  10. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    powerblock TV
    my high school auto teacher
    some of the professors in college training
    service manuals
    me
    breaking shit

  11. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Me!

    And the help of mainly automotive forums, LULZ, youtube and just googling things (not actually using google tho cuz It's unironically ran by satanic pedophiles)

    I've also owned like 30 cars in the last 12 years too though so that really helps upping your wrenching skills

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      and I gotta give credit to my dad, he was a decent DIY auto repair guy. He helped me change the head gaskets on my 2nd car (geo metro) and helped me with several jobs on my first few cars I owned.

      Thanks dad!

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Is your father Scotty Kilmer? Pic related.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          no he not bruh.

          Isn't it crazy that scotty prolly an easy 10 million+ networth

  12. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    A large part of my childhood was helping build and expand my Dads shop, I picked up a lot of things from him but also learned a lot from taking on my own car and truck projects.

  13. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    95% myself

    The other 5% were holding the flash light for my dad. We sometimes wrench on his shit together.

    Now he is the one holding the flashlight.

    >back then there were only the big heavy flash lights, not that fancy led shit

  14. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Noone, i don't care about it. Most issues can be fixed using tutorials. Shit that is hard to fix on your own would is better outsourced than done on your own (given that your time costs more than the dealer/independent shop bill).

  15. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Me, had to just figure shit out.

  16. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    How much did you spend on your tools bros? I've always wanted to wrench some stuff on my E36, but I barely have a screwdriver.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I always bought shit as I needed it.

      Get a good 200-300 pc Crapsman set to start they usually run for about bout $100-270, and then a decent jack and set of Jackstands will probably set you back another 300-400.

      And before you complain "that's too expensive." most of the parts you're replacing with those tools will often cost as much or more, so keep that in mind if you're trying to make a hobby out of it.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >E36
      Basic survival level
      $100
      Deal with plenty of crap at home
      $500-$2k
      Private workshop
      $5k-$50k

  17. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bits of my dad and the rest from asking around

  18. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    To be fair, it I had to start from scratch I probably wouldn't bother.

  19. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    My dad is decently handy but doesn't really do car stuff. He taught me bare minimum basics like changing oil or putting a spare tire on, though, and more general stuff like how to use basic power tools, avoiding cross-threading bolts, basic electrical, etc., plus it meant I had tools in the house that I was able to use to get started.
    Once I had cars and the interest in working on them it was a combo of books, forums, trial and error, and helping more experienced friends out with their projects.
    Finally I ended up working at a very serious motorsports shop that did pretty much everything you'd need on a race car, from alignment and corner balancing to cage fab etc., I didn't actually go there as a tech (I was supposed to be the office and media/marketing guy) but we were always understaffed so I ended up helping out in the shop a lot and the guys let me use tools and equipment and taught me to do stuff on my own projects or friends' cars after hours.

  20. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    My dad and my mum

  21. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Myself, you fucking retard

  22. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    grew up on a farm before internet

  23. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    YouTube and hard times.

    Daddy was too busy making money and pretending to be a Boy Scout leader to actually instill some skills into his kids.

  24. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    israelitetube, LULZ, car forums

  25. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    If I had to start completely alone with no family shop tools and no one to help trouble shoot, I would probably spend double the time on each little truck project I have. It’s definitely easier with some actual know how on hand

  26. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    rc cars, my dad hated that i was good at something that was a mystery to him.

    when i was 19 he sold my 1985 corolla sr5 to the scrap yard because i had pulled the engine out to put a 4age in it because he assumed the car was broken.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >when i was 19 he sold my 1985 corolla sr5 to the scrap yard because i had pulled the engine out to put a 4age in it because he assumed the car was broken.
      this reminds me of my old man trying to get me to sell my entire car cause i dropped the subframe to do a bunch of bushings, it was only there for a day yet he was absolutely certain it was done for.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      What? Your dad without your permission sold the chassis to a junkyard? Who's name was it under you still need the title to junk something at least in my state

  27. 3 months ago
    Bepis

    Nobody taught God how to do what he does.

    He made his share of mistakes along the way tho.

  28. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >no dad
    >no brothers
    >no frens
    >only have youtube to teach me

    Only make my cars worse

  29. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    People at work saying “just figure it out, retard”

  30. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Myself and the mechanics from my battalion. When you're the Officer in charge of that shift and a patrol car shits itself at 19:00 on a Saturday and you can afford to park it you rack up experience really fast.

  31. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Never learnt.
    My dad didnt do more than changing a bulb himself.
    I am an apartment cuck using street parking.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Taught myself, but only after many, many life signs telling me i should git gud
      >dad died when i was 3 or so, left a bitch ass slightly tuned golf mk1 gti behind
      >mom was driving it, it was getting worse and worse, she had engine rebuild at mechanic, eventually she had to sell it because it was just falling apart, wheel arches rusted and plastic body kit around them started detaching itself
      >so, early in life kinda realized that being able to keep your car alive is a big deal
      >got a miata, been doing all kinds of minor stuff myself, brakes, alternator replacement, whatnot
      >after 3 years it turned out my miata had wheel arches made of putty, it all rusted so bad that fixing it was as expensive as getting another miat
      >got rust-free MR2
      >doing pretty much everything myself, but didn't have balls to try rebuilding engine on my own
      >got another guy to rebuild it, pretty sure he scammed me at least partially, for example he charged me tons of money for a knock sensor and when i finally checked, it had some old knock sensor inside with a huge bolt welded to it (???)
      >engine runs for now, but it takes more oil than you'd expect from a full rebuild

      Gonna buy 2zz and put it in myself, will be a good adventure. I will probably avoid mechanics as much as possible from now on.

      I've recently put in new suspension struts and sway bars while parked on the curb next to the road with next to zero discomfort, don't think this is keeping you from doing at least basic maintenance. Also, nothing stops you from just putting tools in car and going to the nearest semi-empty parking lot. If you want to learn it, just go ahead and start trying, there is so much easy stuff you can do yourself just with a set of sockets.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >rebuilding engine
        For what purpose?

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          It was ruined beyond reason when I bought it, I went for a 3k km trip and i was filling it with 1l of oil every 200-300km. Now it gets 800-1000km with every oil top-up, which is acceptable.

  32. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Me, and I regret not starting earlier (30).
    Been repairing my car for over a year but I still fuck up by forgetting some basic things.

    Last time, I changed the oil pump and did some small repairs.
    After cleaning the oil sum, I installed it and made sure everything was torqued up to spec.
    Things were looking good so I started to fill the car with new oil.

    While at it, I started to check around how many tools I had to put back into their place and checked the time and to my susprise, I was quite ahead of schedule.

    Suddenly, I realise the drain plug was on the table.

    >FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

    Spent one and a half hours cleaning the floor and the lift well.

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