Which version of Enneads should I read? Any translation stands above others?

Which version of Enneads should I read? Any translation stands above others?

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Read the original, anglonagger.

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Dont read the Penguin one if you care about translations, thats far as I can say

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I heard Stephen MacKenna’s translation is very respected.

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Guthrie

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Any translation stands above others?
    Thomas Taylor, albeit incomplete it is the best. Second best is A.H. Armstrong, which is complete.

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is Lloyd P. Gerson's any good?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yes

      https://i.imgur.com/WahfDNQ.jpg

      Which version of Enneads should I read? Any translation stands above others?

      Gerson

      >Any translation stands above others?
      Thomas Taylor, albeit incomplete it is the best. Second best is A.H. Armstrong, which is complete.

      DON’T read this one, this anon is a pseud

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >DON’T read this one, this anon is a pseud
        That's not a refutal, and your ad hominem does not work on me.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Refutation*. You’re so retarded you can’t spell, therefore your book recommendations are probably shit too. That’s logic.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            The only logic I see here is that you are so utterly retarded that you didn't even bother to see that the word actually exists.

            Great job moron, now everything you said can be disregarded and everyone here knows how much of an utter fool you are.

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Although I've only read a few of the Enneads, the MacKenna translation is sometimes touted as one of the great triumphs of the art of translation. Academics like the new one so if you are reading to write, that might be a good choice.

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Can someone eli5 what Plotinus is about? Is he only worth reading if you want to connect Plato to Christianity?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Can someone eli5 what Plotinus is about
      No. Go back.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Been here since ‘11, bucko, when you were still playing with yugi-oh cards

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          You could've taken the time to google "wtf is plotinus talking about" once in those eleven years and yet here you are, begging strangers to explain it to you. Quit being lazy.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            So you can’t explain it. You could have just said that

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I've finally gotten into reading about it after seeing mentioned often, I DL'd Neoplatonism by Pauliina Remes and so far it's quite good. But obviously, I suppose, you must withstand the first page obligatory mention of Hapatia being killed. Muh female philosophers.... Keep your grains of sugar/salt handy.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I can tell you he is not about connecting Plato to Christianity, so much so that early Christian fathers like Augustine still remained hostile towards the "Neoplatonists" and their ideas, even though there are a few similarities between them in certain respects. Plotinus, especially Proclus (through the connection to Julian), would be better called an attempt to link Plato directly to the Roman state religion and its mythology. And that's still a major simplification of Plotinus, there is no ELI5.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Zeus-Jupiter
        >Athena-Minerva
        >…
        Some groundbreaking work there

  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Read the original.

  10. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    So did we settle on a translation yet, or what?

  11. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    MacKenna's is poetic. Gerson's new one is the academic standard.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      This. Get both if you love Plotinus. If you are academically studying him, get the Gerson and the Loebs (for the Greek). MacKenna if you are interested in Neoplatonism as practicable Mysticism.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >practicable Mysticism
        what's the point to it when you rarely have a real understanding of your experiences and you just end up acting as a phone line for the mystical?

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          I am by no means expert enough to answer you. Plotinus experienced union (according to Porphry) multiple times. Look at how his life was. He didn't act like a phone line he taught, he helped people out (saved Porphry from suicide by telling him to leave Rome), and even managed peoples estates (children put under his care). Iamblichus and Porphry were both sound men, and Julian was an emperor. Mystical union is, within a Neoplatonic framework, experiencing the one, if you believe in it, there can be no higher aim.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            ,*

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