What was life in bronze age scandinavia like?


Warning: Attempt to read property "comment_date" on null in /var/www/wptbox/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1043

Warning: Attempt to read property "comment_date" on null in /var/www/wptbox/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1043

Warning: Attempt to read property "comment_date" on null in /var/www/wptbox/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1043

What was life in bronze age scandinavia like?

  1. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >click
    nice place
    >drag
    be a shame if anything happened to it

  2. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Europe was very underdeveloped although they did engage in trade with major civilizations on a regular basis. On the other hand maybe it wasn't as primitive as is officially accepted.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tollense_valley_battlefield#:~:text=The%20battlefield%20of%20the%20Tollense,of%20the%20Mecklenburg%20Lake%20District.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Battle site much older than near east.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Things survive in swamps and under peat due to lack of oxygen whereas they rust and decay under sand due to oxygen permeability. Low population density also makes it less likely that someone comes along and loots the battle site before it's deposited under the soil. Middle east had very few such environments and many-fold more people going around everywhere, making it unlikely for battle remains to be deposited at all and likely for them to be looted.

        The thing in common with all ancient European battle sites with abundant materials is that they were found in a swamp or waterlogged soil. They even find wooden weapons that would have normally decayed within a couple of decades, thanks to the preserving power of swamps. This just reminds me that archaeological finds are extremely biased in favor of things that happened at or near swamps, there's a ton of things we will never even know existed because most of the populated world was not a swamp and most remains disappeared only a century or so after they were left in place.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Shit there are medieval birch bark letters constantly found in the swamps of Novgorod, and in normal soils that fully rots in no time given how thing it is.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Only in the prior five to 10 years has the archaeology establishment permitted consideration of the notion that human civilization began prior to 7 millennia ago. It has gone wholly noticed in the internet age that findings like Gobleki Tepi from the 90s disprove that notion in whole. I personally think the question isn't when did human civilization begin, but rather how many of them sprang up in the 280k years since homo sapiens evolved only to be filtered by cataclism and inter-special war prior to reaching the industrial age. I have a hunch that bronze age types of technological achievement may have happened on multiple occasions prior to the younger-dryas period 12 thousand years ago which lead to global sea level rise and cataclysm remembered in well known flood mythos spanning the globe today. I hesitate to go around saying that bronze age civilzation surely happened prior to the occurrence we know of, but it's fun to imagine it did. And frankly, with many variants of home existing since the dawn of homo erectus 2 million years ago, who is to say that in 2 million years a civilization or two did not flourish, only to be completely fucking deleted later or buried under cataclysm and ground to dust by techtonics? idk, fun to think about. Happy saturday anons. I'm off the elixir of life tonight.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Have a great one yer cunt!

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >I have a hunch that bronze age types of technological achievement may have happened on multiple occasions prior to the younger-dryas period
        your hunch is severely retarded

  3. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Like shit.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Miserable place. Both cold and humid, no resources, shit land.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Just the conditions that produce the most powerful race of men.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          >implying that New Jersey will eventually create strong men

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            new jersey gets much hotter than scandinavia

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            I have a suspicion that in an event of a collapse of the civilization, New Jersey would be just fine.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Miserable place. Both cold and humid, no resources, shit land.

          Scandinavia's weather is paradise compared to other places in the same latitude thanks to the Atlantic current. It's not like they came from the artic, they just colonized the Scandi coast from comfy Denmark

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            We had this thread before, but this one's comfier.

            IIRC, late stone age and early bronze age Scandinavia was also in a warm period, which helped at least the Danes maxing out on agriculture.

            Adding to this:

            >...how large were stocks of bronze in Denmark during the Bronze Age and how fast was the rate of replacement?
            >For the period between 1500 and 1100 BC, if we use a conservative estimate based on the distribution of circa 50,000 Early Bronze Age barrows (Holst et al. 2013), combined with our knowledge of farm densities, we can assume that half of Denmark (22,000 square km) was settled at one farm per square km and each farm had at least two working axes of 500 g, which were the most important tool for daily purposes. In this scenario, the 22,000 farms required a stock of 22 metric tons of bronze.
            >Since axes would have been worn by daily use and sharpening, they were conservatively reduced annually by 5% (25 g/farm), which suggests a replacement rate for Denmark Bronze Age metal of about 1 metric ton per year.
            >We can then add to this a considerable consumption of bronze sickles, weapons, and ornaments needed for use, replacements, and burial and hoard consumption; the figure for the deposition of swords alone around 1300 BC (Period II–III of the Nordic Bronze Age) ranges between 10,000 and 20,000 (Bunnefeld and Schwenzer 2011; Kristiansen and Suchowska-Ducke 2015).
            >From these rough extrapolations, the annual imports of metal in the region must have been very high, at least from 1600 BC onward and would have required regular and well-organized trade expeditions.

            The spam filter thinks the link is spam, so I'll just name it. 'The Provenance, Use, and Circulation of Metals in the European Bronze Age: The State of Debate', Journal of Archaeological Research volume 27, pages 131–185 (2019). It's open access, so you should be able to find it easily.

            >The increasing flood of new data relating to Bronze Age Europe, as well as our abilities to analyze them, has significantly enhanced potential estimations and calculations relating to absolute numbers of settlements, materials, or people (e.g., Holst et al. 2013).
            >Thus, if we combine data from well-excavated settlements with exceptional preservation, such as Must Farm in England (see Table 1) or the lakeshore settlements of Switzerland (Menotti 2001, 2004), where we get a glimpse of the everyday use of bronze tools and objects, with statistics from larger regions, we arrive at figures with a rather high degree of probability.
            >In Must Farm (see Fig. 1), every house had a bronze assemblage that included seven axes, two spears, two sickles, two chisels/gouges, and a razor (Wiseman 2018, p. 46); similar assemblages have been found in Bronze Age Swiss lakeshore settlements. We may thus assume that each farm during the Bronze Age had a set of tools with at least two axes and two sickles.

            In addition to extensive metal imports, woolen textiles, whether finished or semi-finished, would have been imported. In northern Europe at this time, apparently no wool industry existed; 80% of the analyzed textiles from there have nonlocal origins (cf. Frei et al. 2015).
            >Considering the estimate of Denmark’s population during the period after 1500 BC (c. 220,000–300,000 people), thousands of pieces of cloth must have been imported annually from the south. The picture of an organized, regular, long-distance commodity trade emerges from these figures.

            Does it mention anything related to pic related as to where it was made?

            • 7 months ago
              Anonymous

              Its artistic style is characteristic of the Nordic Bronze Age, so it would have been made locally, close to where it was found, which is on the island of Zealand, Denmark.

              As for the metals used: they would originally have been imported from the south, through the trade routes of Central Europe. The article I referred to earlier summarizes it as follows:

              >While copper from the rising production of the Mitterberg mines [in the northeastern Alps] reached consumers across temperate Europe (Pernicka et al. 2016a), Scandinavia seems to have relied on a string of copper sources, which apart from Mitterberg and the Slovak Carpathians, include the British Isles, the Italian Alps, and Iberia in the Late Bronze Age (Ling and Stos-Gale 2015; Pernicka et al. 2016a).
              >Around 1200/1100 BC, in connection with the expansion of the Atlantic Bronze Age network, there was a visible shift in the sources of copper for the Scandinavian bronzes to southern Spain (Ling et al. 2014; Ling and Uhnér 2014).
              >...there are currently no tin-mining sites in Europe that have been radiocarbon dated to the Bronze Age, in marked contrast to regions farther east (Boroffka et al. 2002; Garner 2014; Parzinger and Boroffka 2003; Stöllner et al. 2011; Yener et al. 2015).
              >The archaeological evidence for potential sites of tin ore extraction relies on associated Bronze Age material culture or settlement activity, as at San Cristóbal de Logrosán in Spain or St. Renan, Finistère, in northwestern France (Mahé-le Carlier et al. 2001; Rodríguez et al. 2013).

              The gold would either have been from Central Europe, or found in much smaller quantities in Scandinavia itself.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Oh neato, thanks. I assume this is also from:
                >'The Provenance, Use, and Circulation of Metals in the European Bronze Age: The State of Debate', Journal of Archaeological Research volume 27, pages 131–185 (2019).
                ?

                One thing that's really interesting is the Egyptian connection; amber beads from the Baltic shores have been found at ancient Egyptian sites, while Egyptian colored glass beads have been found in Denmark. What this implies is that - at least indirectly - there was a trade route between the Baltic (including Denmark) and Egypt.

                That's a distance of more than 2000 miles as the crow flies - and a lot more than that if you take into account the long, winding overland journeys that middleman traders would have needed to make between the Mediterranean coast and the Baltic coast. Even if traders on the European side of the Mediterranean sailed coastal ships from the Greek mainland all the way up to Istria, they still would have needed to either cross or circumvent the eastern Alps and then follow the various rivers and bogs north through Central Europe.

                I'd imagine going through the Baltic it might be the river systems going down to the Black Sea. Seems like the most conveniently apparent route to Egypt. Any traces of Danish amber anywhere interesting? It's one of the things we have or at least had a lot of.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        back then it had the climate of northern france/southern germany and they grew wine

  4. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    If nothing else, pretty kino.

    Probably in danger of extremely romanticising but I imagine it as small tribes bound by blood and kinship, using germanic honour based law. Obviously in terms of quality of life pretty awful though.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Wdym Germanic OP asked for bronze age.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah and where did they come from?

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Nordic Bronze Age was obviously Germanic. It's where the whole ethnicity essentially came into being, with the I1 explosion.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Distinction between Germans and Celts came on much later, can't really talk about any ethnicity at that stage.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Proto-Germanics then, from where Germanic law originated

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            No, Celts are different. They're similar, but hard to mistake by that point.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            celts did not branch from germanic or vise versa

  5. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Shit
    Average Life expectancy was probably 12 or something

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Can you use your brain for just one second and think on how that would even be possible?

  6. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Obviously not as Slavic as your picture shows

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yes, that was a retarded picture choice by OP (but I do like that artist's paintings; I have lots of them saved). Here's an actually historically suitable one.

      Wdym Germanic OP asked for bronze age.

      What?
      >What was life in bronze age scandinavia like?
      Scandinavians are Germanics; dunno what you're on about.

      >Shitmaiden
      There is no evidence that they ever existed.

      >There is no evidence that they ever existed.
      The epithet is certainly real and genuine, and is attested plenty of times. For example, from Ǫrvar-Odds saga:
      >«hér er gjǫf, Oddr, er ek vil þér gefa, þat er ein skjalmær, er hon ørugg í bardaga ok hefir mér jafnan vel fylgt».
      This is quite a neat citation, since it outright mentions these so-called shieldmaidens, and their capabilities, or duties - at least for this one specifically. I shall translate it for you:
      >"here is a gift, Oddr, that I'd like to give you: It's a shieldmaiden; she's fearless in battle, and has constantly been a good companion (< lit. "followed me well")"

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        For sure they where a thing in literature, but most stories containing shield maidens is a precautionary tale, they usually die or get maimed in battle. Despite their bravery.

        Usually the moral of these stories are boiled down to, Women shouldn't be fighters, despite some of them being brave and strong.

  7. 7 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Piggy pig pig pigs! Oink oink!! Hehe

  8. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    they worshiped this*

    *later artist's impression

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Nice fantasy deviant art, that’s not remotely like what their images of gods looked like

      This is also a fantasy modern interpretation but a far less retarded one

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Interpretation less retarded yes but you do realise that we know nothing of how slavic gods looked liked right?

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Nice fantasy deviant art, that’s not remotely like what their images of gods looked like

      This is also a fantasy modern interpretation but a far less retarded one

      Smite is a based game.

  9. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Nordic bronze age was nicer and warmer than it is now, I read the when it started getting colder is when the germanics first started moving south to warmer more comfortable climate.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Well I live in southern Germany and it was 36°C a few days ago. Fuck this shit, mistakes were made

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >not getting consistent 90+ degree days
        lel

  10. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    idk but I love bronze age europe like a motherfuck, I just want to be an eagle and just explore all the ancient cultures without disturbing them, fuck

  11. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    They were a shithole well into the middle ages, imagine how much more of a shithole it was thousands of years prior.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Bronze age was rembered as better times into classical antiquity, so maybe not.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Who remembers the bronze age?

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Probably the egyptians and the indians.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Indian
            What?

  12. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Likely not as impressive compared to say, life in the bronze age Near East

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      For the average person, life in the Nordic Bronze Age was about the same as it was in that region at any point from around 3000 BC until around 1350 AD.

      You lived on a farmstead, with a handful of other farmsteads located close by. Your house was a long structure, made of a wooden frame with wattle and daub walls and a thatched or turfed roof depending on the area you were in. It consisted of two parts: the part where the people lived, and the part where the animals lived during winter, usually with a partition wall in between. In the center of the part of the house where the people lived was a stone-lined hearth, which was kept burning for most of the winter and during nights. The walls would have been dyed or stained (something you don't see in a lot of modern reconstructions, sadly), and inside you would have had carpets, tools and other decorations on the walls, depending on your status.

      While the architecture wasn't as impressive (as ) points out, because there weren't any major cities, the standard of living in Northwestern Europe may actually have been a little higher than in the Near East. Recent archaeological estimates of the availability of bronze tools, which were once thought to have been available only to relatively high-status households, suggests that households in Northwestern Europe almost all had at least some bronze tools for specific purposes (axeheads, carving knives, spearheads, et cetera), which in turn means they were part of continent-spanning trade networks and apparently produced enough surplus value to be able to barter for the necessary copper and tin.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Recent archaeological estimates of the availability of bronze tools
        Link?

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          The spam filter thinks the link is spam, so I'll just name it. 'The Provenance, Use, and Circulation of Metals in the European Bronze Age: The State of Debate', Journal of Archaeological Research volume 27, pages 131–185 (2019). It's open access, so you should be able to find it easily.

          >The increasing flood of new data relating to Bronze Age Europe, as well as our abilities to analyze them, has significantly enhanced potential estimations and calculations relating to absolute numbers of settlements, materials, or people (e.g., Holst et al. 2013).
          >Thus, if we combine data from well-excavated settlements with exceptional preservation, such as Must Farm in England (see Table 1) or the lakeshore settlements of Switzerland (Menotti 2001, 2004), where we get a glimpse of the everyday use of bronze tools and objects, with statistics from larger regions, we arrive at figures with a rather high degree of probability.
          >In Must Farm (see Fig. 1), every house had a bronze assemblage that included seven axes, two spears, two sickles, two chisels/gouges, and a razor (Wiseman 2018, p. 46); similar assemblages have been found in Bronze Age Swiss lakeshore settlements. We may thus assume that each farm during the Bronze Age had a set of tools with at least two axes and two sickles.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            Adding to this:

            >...how large were stocks of bronze in Denmark during the Bronze Age and how fast was the rate of replacement?
            >For the period between 1500 and 1100 BC, if we use a conservative estimate based on the distribution of circa 50,000 Early Bronze Age barrows (Holst et al. 2013), combined with our knowledge of farm densities, we can assume that half of Denmark (22,000 square km) was settled at one farm per square km and each farm had at least two working axes of 500 g, which were the most important tool for daily purposes. In this scenario, the 22,000 farms required a stock of 22 metric tons of bronze.
            >Since axes would have been worn by daily use and sharpening, they were conservatively reduced annually by 5% (25 g/farm), which suggests a replacement rate for Denmark Bronze Age metal of about 1 metric ton per year.
            >We can then add to this a considerable consumption of bronze sickles, weapons, and ornaments needed for use, replacements, and burial and hoard consumption; the figure for the deposition of swords alone around 1300 BC (Period II–III of the Nordic Bronze Age) ranges between 10,000 and 20,000 (Bunnefeld and Schwenzer 2011; Kristiansen and Suchowska-Ducke 2015).
            >From these rough extrapolations, the annual imports of metal in the region must have been very high, at least from 1600 BC onward and would have required regular and well-organized trade expeditions.

            • 7 months ago
              Anonymous

              In addition to extensive metal imports, woolen textiles, whether finished or semi-finished, would have been imported. In northern Europe at this time, apparently no wool industry existed; 80% of the analyzed textiles from there have nonlocal origins (cf. Frei et al. 2015).
              >Considering the estimate of Denmark’s population during the period after 1500 BC (c. 220,000–300,000 people), thousands of pieces of cloth must have been imported annually from the south. The picture of an organized, regular, long-distance commodity trade emerges from these figures.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        VGHHH

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Seems so fucking comfy, would trade my life for this in a heartbeat.

  13. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    From Wikipedia:
    >The people of the Nordic Bronze Age were actively engaged in the export of amber, and imported metals in return, becoming expert metalworkers. With respect to the number and density of metal deposits, the Nordic Bronze Age became the richest culture in Europe during its existence.

    >Scandinavian Bronze Age sites present a rich and well-preserved legacy of bronze and gold objects. These valuable metals were all imported, primarily from Central Europe, but they were often crafted locally and the craftsmanship and metallurgy of the Nordic Bronze Age was of a high standard. The lost-wax casting method was used to produce artefacts such as the Trundholm Sun Chariot and the Langstrup belt plate. The archaeological legacy also encompasses locally crafted wool and wooden objects.

    >During the 15th and 14th centuries BC, southern Scandinavia produced and deposited more elaborate bronzes in graves and hoards than any other region of Europe. As regards the number and density of metal deposits, the Nordic Bronze Age became the richest culture in Europe. More Bronze Age swords have also been found in Denmark than anywhere else in Europe. Uniform crucibles found at metal workshop sites further indicate the mass production of certain metal artefacts.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nordic_Bronze_Age

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Germanic metalwork is found all over Bronze Age Europe.
      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_hat

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Most likely proto-Celtic, not Germanic. Germans weren't that far south. Germans have pretty unique ancestry and it's easy to tell based on ancient DNA where they expanded.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          It's in Wales, did any Germanics even migrate there before the Jutes, Anglos and Saxons?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            I was talking about golden hats. They've been found in South Germany. But yeah, the same is true for mold cape. It's post-Beaker.

            And this stuff. That's Celtic.

            • 7 months ago
              Anonymous

              Since you brought it up what cult were the golden hats attached to? It's such an elaborate and expensive object but no cult claims responsibility

            • 7 months ago
              Anonymous

              Celtic metalworking is much more elaborate. Stop conflating the Golden Hat style metalwork with Celtic. I already dunked on the retards in the last thread with the same title claiming it was Celtic and the tranny jannies had to nuke the thread.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                It's certainly not Germanic because Germanics did not live in South Germany in Bronze and early Iron Age.
                >Celtic metalworking is much more elaborate
                That's why I said proto-Celtic. This is late Bronze Age. Hallstatt and La Tene weren't yet a thing. Urnfield dominated in Europe, including the mentioned region.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Shut up retard, it's proto-Germanic, not proto-Celtic

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                How can it be proto-Germanic if Germanics did not live in South Germany back then? Stop stealing others achievements Hans.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Nordic Bronze Age culture was far more advanced than early Celts. At best Celts introduced technologies, which I'm growing more skeptical of by the day.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                So two armies of advanced proto-germanics travelled to south Germany where they didn't live, had a big battle with each other, and then went back home?

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                see

                From Wikipedia:
                >The people of the Nordic Bronze Age were actively engaged in the export of amber, and imported metals in return, becoming expert metalworkers. With respect to the number and density of metal deposits, the Nordic Bronze Age became the richest culture in Europe during its existence.

                >Scandinavian Bronze Age sites present a rich and well-preserved legacy of bronze and gold objects. These valuable metals were all imported, primarily from Central Europe, but they were often crafted locally and the craftsmanship and metallurgy of the Nordic Bronze Age was of a high standard. The lost-wax casting method was used to produce artefacts such as the Trundholm Sun Chariot and the Langstrup belt plate. The archaeological legacy also encompasses locally crafted wool and wooden objects.

                >During the 15th and 14th centuries BC, southern Scandinavia produced and deposited more elaborate bronzes in graves and hoards than any other region of Europe. As regards the number and density of metal deposits, the Nordic Bronze Age became the richest culture in Europe. More Bronze Age swords have also been found in Denmark than anywhere else in Europe. Uniform crucibles found at metal workshop sites further indicate the mass production of certain metal artefacts.
                https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nordic_Bronze_Age

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                See what?
                It's literally the other way around. Contacts with continental Europe made the so rich.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                I accept your concession

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Tollense is in northeastern Germany, not far from the Baltic coast.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                The Tollense people weren't Germanics either.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah, it was a Celtic / Baltic dustup with mercs. I think the combatants even hired some Mycenaeans.
                But ultimately: Celts, Balts. The Germans and Slavs around them were probably laughing their arses off

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                It was a weird group. The samples don't really cluster with modern people. Y-DNA also doesn't match modern groups.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                >DNAfags
                Useless information.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                They are modern Celts and Balts but with more WHG.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                No. They are related to the Hungarian Bronze Age people.

                >DNAfags
                Useless information.

                No, it's very useful information because we know how Bronze and Iron Age Scandinavian samples look like, which implies that these guys were not locals and came from somewhere else.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                After the battle they were, remember that Celtoid.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Sources?

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous
              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Your map doesn't prove it. It just shows amber routes.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Use your brain

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                They had more gold for trading than the surrounding cultures had to begin with.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Even more money

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                It's obviously massively exaggerated, but there's a core of truth to it: all humans tend to want to live in aesthetically pleasing spaces. This desire wouldn't have been very different in ancient times.

                There is an ongoing debate among archaeologists and historians about the level of decoration in wooden homes with wattle and daub walls. Increasingly, they're leaning towards the idea that wooden poles would have had carvings or dyes on them, and wattle and daub walls would have been dyed or painted with patterns. After all, that's what they did to nearly every item inside their home, so why not to the walls and beams as well?

                how long before these are melted down by the ministry of culture

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                I remember reading a book, amongst other things it talked about the northern sea trade in ancient times. I see the amber hot spots, but wasn't there supposed to be tin hot spots in the brittish islands?

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                so metallurgy was invented by Anatolians like Hittites and Hatts?

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                No, there weren't any Hittites back then. Oldest metallurgy is from the Balkans. Oldest bronze from Iran and South Caucasus.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Oldest metallurgy is from the Balkans
                Actually the oldest metallurgy is from Neolithic Iraq, but it was not bronze they were using that came a 1000 years afterwards.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Oldest smelted metals are from the Balkans - copper.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Nope lead was being smelted before that.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                There's no evidence of that. There's one piece of smelted lead from Anatolia. But it was most likely an incident that happened during the fire.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Aside from the smelted lead there are also many finds of hammered lead and copper pendants throughout the Levant and Iraq since 7000 BC. They clearly knew it could be worked with. Either way the first example of smelting is from the Neolithic.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Cold and hot hammering is irrelevant, that's not metallurgy. The oldest well dated smelted metals are from Serbia. Very old ones are also from Iran. But the Balkan metallurgists were superior to anyone on the planet. The Middle East continued to produce small beads, while Balkanites had all kinds of copper tools - hammers, axes, israeliteelry, and so on.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Cold and hot hammering is irrelevant, that's not metallurgy.
                It is literally metallurgy. Smelting is only one part of metallurgy and even that came from the Middle East.
                >The oldest well dated smelted metals
                As previously noted the oldest smelted metal came from the Near East.
                >Very old ones are also from Iran.
                By your own admission.
                >But the Balkan metallurgists
                Reminder these guys came straight out of the Middle East. They replaced the local Europeans they encountered in the Balkans.
                >The Middle East continued to produce small beads
                Is Iran part of the Middle East? They made tons of smelted metals, introduced metal weapons, and invented bronze which they spread to other societies including your favorite Balkan copper smelters.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                >It is literally metallurgy. Smelting is only one part of metallurgy and even that came from the Middle East.
                It's not the exact same thing retard, hence the distinction.
                >As previously noted the oldest smelted metal came from the Near East.
                So we have similar dates in both regions, therefore the far greater abundance points to the Balkans.
                >Reminder these guys came straight out of the Middle East. They replaced the local Europeans they encountered in the Balkans.
                Shill-tier bullshit. EEF is itself a composite population.
                >They made tons of smelted metals, introduced metal weapons, and invented bronze which they spread to other societies including your favorite Balkan copper smelters.
                You're conflating advent with proliferation.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                >It's not the exact same thing retard, hence the distinction.
                You're an idiot smelting is not the same thing as metallurgy. Either way the first smelting began in the Near East.
                >So we have similar dates in both regions
                No the Near East metallurgy predates it by two thousand years.
                >Shill-tier bullshit. EEF is itself a composite population.
                I am not surprised you're this stupid. All EEF were majority Middle Eastern, but in the cases of Balkan EEF they're 95% Middle Eastern. They're the ones with the least European admixture and also the most advanced.
                >You're conflating advent with proliferation.
                It was both, retard.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Can't even read, calls others retard. LOL

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                >You're an idiot smelting is not the same thing as metallurgy.
                Read again retard, nobody said it was. Carry on with your haploautism though.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Wrong again, you claimed metallurgy is the same as smelting, it's not as I already showed. Also I have not mentioned any haplogroups, retard.

                >Either way the first smelting began in the Near East.
                Incorrect.

                >No the Near East metallurgy predates it by two thousand years.
                Nope.

                Okay, I guess it's time. Post your sources. Here's one of mine:

                https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/79498371.pdf

                >At present knowledge, the site of Belovode in eastern Serbia has produced the earliest securely dated evidence for copper smelting, at 5000 to 4600 BC (Radivojević et al. 2010). Two sites from Iran currently dated to the 5th millennium, Tal-i-Iblis and Tepe Ghabristan, have also yielded evidence of very early copper smelting in the form of slagged crucible fragments (Dougherty & Caldwell 1966; Majidzadeh 1979; Pigott 1999; Pigott & Lechtman 2003). This provides evidence for nearly contemporary copper smelting in the early 5th millennium both east and west of Anatolia, but at some considerable distance and leaving a conspicuous gap in between.

                >Incorrect.
                You can cry all you want but smelting was already documented in Anatolia and the Levant.
                >site of Belovode in eastern Serbia has produced the earliest securely dated evidence for copper smelting, at 5000 to 4600 BC
                This is 1000 years before smelting in Levant and Anatolia (Balkans metallurgists passed through here to get to Europe). It is also 3000 years before lead metallurgy in the Levant and Iraq.

                Also I accept your concession on everything else. Balkan EEF is from the Middle East and their forefathers had already discovered the first metallurgy and first smelting beforehand.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                See:
                Post your sources.

                And better something new with carbon dating.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Wrong again, you claimed metallurgy is the same as smelting, it's not as I already showed. Also I have not mentioned any haplogroups, retard.
                That's a different poster, and you did mention cultures with specific haplogroups.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Kid did I even mention haplogroups where are you getting this shit from? You or that other retard can point out where I said haplogroup and such.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Good grief just stop derailing the thread

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Shut up retard dumbass doesn't even know what a haplogroup is and calls me a haploautist kek.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Seek help

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Either way the first smelting began in the Near East.
                Incorrect.

                >No the Near East metallurgy predates it by two thousand years.
                Nope.

                Okay, I guess it's time. Post your sources. Here's one of mine:

                https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/79498371.pdf

                >At present knowledge, the site of Belovode in eastern Serbia has produced the earliest securely dated evidence for copper smelting, at 5000 to 4600 BC (Radivojević et al. 2010). Two sites from Iran currently dated to the 5th millennium, Tal-i-Iblis and Tepe Ghabristan, have also yielded evidence of very early copper smelting in the form of slagged crucible fragments (Dougherty & Caldwell 1966; Majidzadeh 1979; Pigott 1999; Pigott & Lechtman 2003). This provides evidence for nearly contemporary copper smelting in the early 5th millennium both east and west of Anatolia, but at some considerable distance and leaving a conspicuous gap in between.

  14. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Cute, except completely fictional. They were great smiths, but not architects. There's no evidence of any cities in Bronze Age Scandinavia.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's a painting by some Russian about how he imagines ancient Slavs, including mammoths, aliens and space ships. It was never intended to have anything to do with bronze age Scandinavians and nobody ever seriously suggested it looked anything like it, except maybe Varg, but IDK. Would be great inspiration for a fantasy setting and many of the paintings are actually very nice. OP has made basically this exact thread before, but by virtue of simply taking his question at face value and as actual curiosity rather than shit flinging about wewuzzing, people who know and actually give a fuck have contributed to a nice, comfy and informative thread, so I don't mind personally.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        specifically about russian hyperboreans iirc

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Based painter actually believes this to be historically accurate. I don't know makes him believe this.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          It's obviously massively exaggerated, but there's a core of truth to it: all humans tend to want to live in aesthetically pleasing spaces. This desire wouldn't have been very different in ancient times.

          There is an ongoing debate among archaeologists and historians about the level of decoration in wooden homes with wattle and daub walls. Increasingly, they're leaning towards the idea that wooden poles would have had carvings or dyes on them, and wattle and daub walls would have been dyed or painted with patterns. After all, that's what they did to nearly every item inside their home, so why not to the walls and beams as well?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >There is an ongoing debate among archaeologists and historians about the level of decoration in wooden homes with wattle and daub walls.

            if we go by later historical examples then we can probably guess that the rich had highly decorated houses while the poor had less or more simple decorations

  15. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    One thing that's really interesting is the Egyptian connection; amber beads from the Baltic shores have been found at ancient Egyptian sites, while Egyptian colored glass beads have been found in Denmark. What this implies is that - at least indirectly - there was a trade route between the Baltic (including Denmark) and Egypt.

    That's a distance of more than 2000 miles as the crow flies - and a lot more than that if you take into account the long, winding overland journeys that middleman traders would have needed to make between the Mediterranean coast and the Baltic coast. Even if traders on the European side of the Mediterranean sailed coastal ships from the Greek mainland all the way up to Istria, they still would have needed to either cross or circumvent the eastern Alps and then follow the various rivers and bogs north through Central Europe.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      I heard that large quantities of dairy were exported from Europe to Mesopotamia... Which is even more fascinating.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Oh neato, thanks. I assume this is also from:
      >'The Provenance, Use, and Circulation of Metals in the European Bronze Age: The State of Debate', Journal of Archaeological Research volume 27, pages 131–185 (2019).
      ?
      [...]
      I'd imagine going through the Baltic it might be the river systems going down to the Black Sea. Seems like the most conveniently apparent route to Egypt. Any traces of Danish amber anywhere interesting? It's one of the things we have or at least had a lot of.

      IIRC some Alpine passes were already used around that time, a least here in Switzerland. Amber was cited as one main trade good

  16. 7 months ago
    Anonymous
  17. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    likely better than in the middle east due to lower population and higher access to material wealth (although wealth would have been spread more evenly so it's more like every one is a well off farmer rather than a noble). and if we extrapolate from later eras it would also be highly likely that the people living there were freer than the ones down south as no one would have been able to exert control over the area and concentrate power and wealth.

  18. 7 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous
    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      That's like a completely different era.

      Half of the picture show non-Germanic or non-NBA artifacts.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's late bronze/early iron age but yes it is a bit later.

  19. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Shieldmaiden

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not a shieldmaiden; likely a ritual dancer.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Close enough for me.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Shitmaiden
      There is no evidence that they ever existed.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Said the Celtoid whose women, "Amazons", were actually just larping as Germanic Shieldmaidens
        You don't say

  20. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    for me, it's hällristningar

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >ywn relax on a boat with your buddies with your dicks out
      Why live?

  21. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    are the petroglypth boats equipped with outriggers?

  22. 7 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Europe was very underdeveloped although they did engage in trade with major civilizations on a regular basis. On the other hand maybe it wasn't as primitive as is officially accepted.
      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tollense_valley_battlefield#:~:text=The%20battlefield%20of%20the%20Tollense,of%20the%20Mecklenburg%20Lake%20District.

  23. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Nice rare ivanov paiting

  24. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Highly advanced Astro-Geometry like in Brittany and the UK

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://www.google.com/amp/s/docplayer.se/amp/22607844-Stenalders-geometri-avancerade-berakningar-bakom-ganggrifterna-pa-falbygden-i-vastergotland-lars-bagerfeldt-blomqvist.html

  25. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ale Stenar same proportions as stonehenge

  26. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Made at the exact latitude the sun over the solstices makes a perfect square

  27. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Lived like today's nagger. Germanic people living standards slowly improved only after the Renaissance.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's time to wake up from your slumber, Celtoid

  28. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Before Lemurian period but after the descent from mount Enu they had functional atomic energy, but they blew themselves apart, causing the North pole to be a lot more fractured then the south pole, then they migrated south and became Norse.

    Source : A Tibetan man hidden in a mountain told me.

  29. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Anatolia as the origin of metallurgy makes the most sense, though.

    >conspicuous gap in between
    Ancient DNA closes this gap, though as both Copper Age Iranians and Europeans received Anatolian admixture (same with Levantines and Caucasians).

    It's probably just bad luck that the oldest ones weren't yet found in Anatolia.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Anatolia as the origin of metallurgy makes the most sense, though.
      Anatolia is the origin of copper smelting. It may have come from the Levant, but the earliest finds of copper smelting are from Anatolia not the Levant.
      >though as both Copper Age Iranians and Europeans received Anatolian admixture
      I don't think the Iranians received any technology from the Anatolians, based on the fact they predate Anatolians and spread their technology to the Anatolians.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Earliest evidence of copper smelting is from South Europe.

        >Iranians spread their technology to the Anatolians
        Chalcolithic Iranian samples have Anatolian admixture.

        About your Iraqi lead smelting:
        > However, both objects were never inspected for their metallurgical properties, and their identification as being the products of lead smelting is conjectural, and is based on the rarity of native lead and the relative ease of lead smelting, which can be performed at temperatures below 800°C ([37], [38], p. 75–76). Several beads from Level IX at Çatal Höyük (7th millennium BCE) were published as smelted lead ([39], p. 217–219), but are currently thought to have been shaped from galena [40]. Thus, it appears that the Ashalim Cave object, based on the concentration of trace elements such as cobalt, might be the earliest lead artifact proven so far to have been produced from smelted lead.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Ashalim Cave is in the Levant and this smelted lead artifact is dated to 4100 BC. 1500 years after the earliest copper objects from the Balkans.

          In fact, it might be younger than the oldest European objects:

          >Eleven biconical vessels from the Copper Age sites Pietrele and Blejeşti (Romania) have been investigated using p-XRF. In most cases, traces of lead could be measured on their surfaces. Samples of slag-like material from two vessels and the clay of one vessel were investigated using laboratory methods, namely SEM, XRD, LIA and optical microscopy. The vessels were obviously used as a kind of crucible in which slag-like remains and galena ore were detected. It still remains unclear as to what final product was gained by smelting galena in this way. The amount of these such vessels in the Pietrele settlement, their appearance as grave goods in Pietrele and Vărăști (Romania), and their supposed occurrence in a number of other Copper Age settlements in Romania and Bulgaria show the significance of this phenomenon. It must have been a widespread and more or less well known practice, an important part of cultural habit during a particular period in the Lower Danube region and likely even farther afield. For the first time, extensive experimentation with lead ore can be shown in a clear chronological horizon, ca. 4400–4300 BCE in southeastern Europe.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Earliest evidence of copper smelting is from Anatolia.
          >Chalcolithic Iranian samples have Anatolian admixture.
          Great.
          >About your Iraqi lead smelting:
          identification as being the products of lead smelting is conjectural
          It's not conclusive if it's smelting but either way it was lead metallurgy.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >This provides evidence for nearly contemporary copper smelting in the early 5th millennium both east and west of Anatolia, but at some considerable distance and leaving a conspicuous gap in between. The Anatolian region harbors some of the earliest known metalwork from prehistory. Against this backdrop, the finds from Çatalhöyük are of particular significance as they could potentially provide evidence of even earlier copper smelting
            >a lump of copper ore from House E V I A turned out to be not ore but copper slag which suggests that smelting may have already been known, by the middle of the 7th millennium

            Target: HRV_Starcevo_LN
            Distance: 5.8071% / 0.05807088
            90.4 TUR_Catalhoyuk_LN
            9.6 LUX_Loschbour

            DNA shows at least 90.4% of Balkan EEF genetics came from the same Anatolian population as the Catalhoyuk people who have evidence for early copper smelting.

            • 7 months ago
              Anonymous

              >DNA shows at least 90.4% of Balkan EEF genetics came from the same Anatolian population as the Catalhoyuk
              Europeans descend from the first real settlement in history? Based

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *