What Happened to Music Culture

I grew up in the 90s, and music culture was so much different compared to now that it's genuinely insane to me, and I struggle to get my head around it. Gonna greentext this for ease of reading my points.
>New genres emerged and were pretty much immediately in the mainstream
>People listened to practically anything
>No really, anything. There was a preference for pop, alt rock, and rap, but those were just preferences and not a cut off for what people enjoyed.
>People were extremely open-minded and willing to listen to music outside of their normal range
>Widespread reverence for older bands, but also newer too.
>People loved Elvis and Chuck Berry and the Breeders and the Cranberries all side by side, and nobody even cared.
>You could literally turn on a normal radio station and hear Buddy Holly playing right before MGMT
>Then-modern artists would both frequently and often take inspiration from those older ones and use that to expand their own sound, it wasn't uncommon to hear rap and rock and country and God-knows what else acts cite everything from the Beatles to Beethoven as major influences
So what the fuck happened? How did this sort of "anything goes" musical culture just... die?

  1. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >MGMT
    FUCK I meant EPMD and I'm sure I'm going to get shit for that

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      MGMT were the last good band anyway

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        They were ok, better than those animal collective retards

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      You’re still fucking wrong. No station would play Buddy Holly and EMPD back to back unless you were some stoner loser with no good taste on some shitty college station. OP is so wrong about this I question if this isn’t a shitpost overall.

  2. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    israelites

  3. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Digital tech removed barriers to entry to production. Internet removed barriers to entry to distribution. This causes a massive increase in music supply, but no corresponding increase in listeners/customers, so budgets collapse and cheapest genre (rap) wins. Additionally, there are no more mainstream superstar acts like The Beatles who get bored making the same thing all the time, start experimenting, and retain listeners anyway because of meme power and lack of alternatives.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      lol if you think stuff coming out since 2012 has 1/5th the quantity and diversity of stuff in the 60s. back then bands would sometimes do 2 albums a year. today you're lucky to get an album every 4 years.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        lol if you think stuff coming out in the 60s has 1/5th the quantity and diversity of stuff since 2012

  4. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    I don’t see much of a future in music discussion, every year music discussion seems to become more limited. I don’t think music is dead, interesting new music is still coming out. But people don’t talk about it, people only talk about the most surface level shit (even on /mu). The only people I see talking about interesting new music are a handful of lone bloggers and a few sites like Sputnikmusic.

  5. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    everything you listed still reigns true as far as I know so ima need you to explain what parts of that you think are gone and what they changed into. I'll give you the radio point tho, outside of hugely populated areas like NYC there isn't any shows in my city that play anything but top 40 apart from the college station.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Not OP but people aren't even remotely as open minded about music as they were in the 90s and new genres don't get mainstream attention aslt all.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        Well duh now it's a playlist culture, everyone's silo'd in their own bubble of personal preferences, "curated" by corporate algos

        The times you are describing were ruled by MTV and radio stations, which created a common audience, something people could talk about, also because they didn't have smartphones and "social" media to keep their eyes on

  6. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    could you imagine young people in 1995 or whatever spending most of their time arguing about and discussing albums from the 50s and 60s? sure there was interest in it and appreciation for the classics, but the main conversation was centered around what was new and fresh at the time. now it doesnt feel like that, instead 20 year old music fans today are spending more time discussing the stuff their parents listened to

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >could you imagine young people in 1995 or whatever spending most of their time arguing about and discussing albums from the 50s and 60s?
      In terms of the 50s no, in terms of the 60s yes, because that was a regular part of the conversation at the time. The 60s in general were highly revered in the 90s

  7. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    shut up and eat the slop

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Honestly you people should take notes from pop homosexuals, at least they discuss new music

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Fuck the slop.

  8. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    somewhere between the telecomunication act of 95 and your brain on TRL

  9. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    It seems to me that your personal view is just based on maybe your own personal experience and what you liked. Music scenes that were dogmatic definitely existed in the 90s just as they do now. Remember how Alice In Chains got booed on the thrash tour? There was a big feud between grunge and metal, and that was fairly closely related music....I mean in the grand scheme that you're talking about, it's all hard rock music, and individual rock scenes didn't get along great, so you really think everyone on a mass scale just listened to everything?

    Also just like in the 90s, there are also always new genres fusing things together that some people like and people more attached to genres dislike. We have hyperpop as an example, it's just about as controversial as rap rock was in the 90s.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      yeah i really don't know in what dimension the 90s happened and people didn't have different music cliques

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        i think people today are too lazy and lack that competitive drive. see there he was determined to prove his band rocked harder than Pearl Jam. but Millenials don't have it in them. nobody does stuff like Lars Ulrich throwing darts at a poster of Winger in a music video. without that you can't make great art.

  10. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    modern music is also nearly all weed/shrooms music, not alcohol music

    less abrasive/agressive, more chill spaced out music is

    you can tell a lot about a culture by the drugs they take

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      The only post in this thread that might have a point

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >less abrasive/agressive, more chill spaced out music is
      What do you think of the whole scream rap scene that popped up? And what about drill?

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      rap? more like crap!
      music was better when people were dropping dead on heroin!

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        And they die of fent now? What's your point?

  11. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Until I clicked that gif I thought that was a heavily modded CJ

  12. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >MGMT
    >90s

  13. 1 week ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      It becomes more true every day

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        reposting this thread every single day isn't going to make it more or less true however.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          It’s a developing issue that is very relevant to all music discussion communities

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      reposting this thread every single day isn't going to make it more or less true however.

      You post this as if LULZ doesn't constantly recycle other thread discussions. There are like 3 threads up about Kurt Cobain calling him a tranny right now.

  14. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    That was before the 2008 recession. Record labels lost a lot of money and Obama bailed them out by offering them gibes if they promoted woke friendly music. Stuff like The Linda Lindas exists purely for tax writeoff purposes and you're not necessarily intended to listen to it.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      [...]

      [...]

  15. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Actually I stopped reading your post at the greentext because it is annoying to read text that is formatted like that. I imagine what you are whinging about can easily be explained by reminding you that you're not a kid anymore.

  16. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    social media

  17. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >cuture industry

  18. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    That...that still happens. People just listen to more niche genres.

  19. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >Buddy Holly before MGMT
    Maybe some fucked up college station would do that but no fucking way would any commercial radio station then or now would play such a contrast of musical decades and genres.

    That reminds me of the time a few years ago I was DJing in a nightclub. Some guy wanders up to me and says “I only listen to Bob Dylan and Tool”. I’m like “that’s nice but look around do you think anyone here wants to listen to any of that”? Jesus fucking Christ what a contrast of music and the worse part is he wasn’t even trying to make it even reasonable I’d play any of his requests. I’m pretty sure he’s one of you fuckers on LULZ though only this board would be that autistic.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      I mean, you could listen to Patti Page and then Pantera but that would make as much sense.

  20. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Trannies ruined it.

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