25 thoughts on “What are some brands for durable clothes made out of quality materials, that aren't overpriced, and that can be found in Europe?

    • Anonymous says:

      This, also get into buying used/classic clothes and take them to a tailor. Most brand names are very hit or miss with huge upfront cost. Also if you really want clothes to last, learn how to laundry properly. ex: minimal washing/detergent usage, spot cleaning and rinse, steaming, brushing, rotation between wears, etc.

    • Anonymous says:

      This, also get into buying used/classic clothes and take them to a tailor. Most brand names are very hit or miss with huge upfront cost. Also if you really want clothes to last, learn how to laundry properly. ex: minimal washing/detergent usage, spot cleaning and rinse, steaming, brushing, rotation between wears, etc.

      try going outside hecking stupid

      The first 2 replies are telling me to do something different, and the third one is just an insult. This board is hecking useless.
      I don’t have time to buy used clothes and then take them to a hecking tailor. Also I do know how to do laundry. It’s just that I’ve been buying really shitty, fast fashion clothes
      until now because they were cheap and I’m tired of their shitty quality. So I want to buy some good clothes, and want to know which brands are the most reliable.

      • Anonymous says:

        it’s impossible to know because you have to wait for the future for that, that’s why anons suggested to buy old clothes: those are proven to be durable
        any modern clothes, even from old brands, will be of worse quality most of the times or be very expensive and they’re usually made on command just like by a tailor but without taking your measures first

      • Anonymous says:

        you just reinforced the point of the 1st reply.
        because you yourself have no idea what makes a piece of cloth "good", you want a shortcut to high quality clothing.

        it does not exist, not as a brand.

        the whole trick if creating a branding is convincing people that everything you make will be excellent, and as good as everything else you ever make, even 100 years after the founding of the company.
        this is of course untrue.

        the solution for you as a consumer is to develop standards of quality, so you can look at a wool sweater or a cotton tshirt and judge it individually and fairly.

        heck who makes it, is the shirt you’re actually staring at well-made?

        figure it the heck out.

        • Anonymous says:

          Ok fair enough. The first reply was actually alright, although quite obvious, but I shat on it along with the 2nd and 3rd ones.
          The problem is I can’t really do that through a screen. If I were buying clothing physically I wouldn’t need to ask this question in the first place. That’s why I want some recommendations for brands
          that GENERALLY produce high quality clothes. Obviously I can’t trust a brand to always do this with all clothes they sell.

          • Anonymous says:

            you have to experiment, and do research, and fail, and eat costs.

            it took pages and pages of reading, and buying sweater after sweater before I could see at a glance a quality piece of wool.

            this is also why buying 2nd hand is so practical, tailor or no tailor: a 300 dollar irish cableknit will be 15-60 on ebay or in a thrift, it makes experimenting possible on realistic budgets.

          • Anonymous says:

            >a 300 dollar irish cableknit will be 15-60 on ebay or in a thrift
            this
            I got a knit polo that retailed for 400$ for 20$ a while back

  1. Anonymous says:

    Other than that/sweaters ?
    Bershka and UCBenneton for jeans.
    Gutteridge (Italian business casual and business) look. Mango sweaters, shirts, sometimes affordable wool or leather pieces. Massimo Dutti same as mango.
    Yes these are mostly fast fashion, but sometimes a particular ff brand carries a well quality particular items (do your research before purchasing, never buy a mixed material item). Generally good but business: Galileo: polo shirts and shirts, varteks: good quality shirts and suits, coats, if you find a sale (online) you could get a wool Harrington style zip jacket for 50 eur.

  2. Anonymous says:

    for knitwear, just search for "made in scotland" or "made in britain" at ebay or some other site with used clothes. plenty of very high quality used knitwear being made in that region, just make sure it’s 100% wool or cashmere. 5$ cashmere scarves and 15$ top quality merino sweaters await you, the difference between them and the paper thin merino knits I got from Uniqlo is hilarious
    measure yourself and the clothes you have and you won’t have to tailor them

  3. Anonymous says:

    Lululemon
    Cotopaxi
    Patagonia (Houdini/R1 Jackets)
    Outlier

    I’ve heard good things about the Amer Sports (Arc’teryx), I’ve yet to personally test their stuff out. It depends on the style because there are a bunch of high-end brands that cater to specific niches.

  4. Anonymous says:

    Wool&Prince (Shirts)
    I haven’t tried Icebreaker, Unbound, or Woolworth yet. Those brands supposely sell decent wool clothing.

  5. Anonymous says:

    >all these posts reccing shit they themselves haven’t even tried
    OP, you’ve been given the best advice already, figure it out.

  6. Anonymous says:

    Irish stores usually have very good wool sweaters and winter wear. A bit on the pricier side but it’s good quality. I wouldn’t say it’s overpriced.

    If you want quality and you come from a first world country, buy stuff that is manufactured in your country or in other firstl world countries. Stuff that says "made in france" or "made in Ireland" is rare to disappoint

    • Anonymous says:

      >Go to mall
      >Luxury store is next to the department store
      >Feel the material
      >Spend a month’s rent on designer shit
      heck!

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