What am I in for?

What am I in for?

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Someone described it to me like a book version of How I met your mother, what the fuck does that mean?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It means you won't find any of it funny.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Lol, so a disappointment.

        Someone described it to me like a book version of How I met your mother, what the fuck does that mean?

        Not op by the way

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Weird out of date horror that horrifies when it's not trying to be scary

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The longer, shittier and incelier version of Carmilla.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nothing of what you said means anything

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm not him, but it certainly does mean something if you know anything about vampire fiction.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Kys

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Why?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >incelier
      Carmilla is the yuri fever dream you masturbate to and Dracula the post ejaculation clarity. Both are great.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        so many languages, and (You) chose to speak facts.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I was surprised by the presentation of the narrative
    I expected it to be a fairly standard third person book but it’s actually more like a collection of letters, diary entries, record logs, and documents, which is cool
    It’s like a 19th century found footage horror film

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    it's fun. very raunchy, can be a drag at times. i remember really having to slog through the last 100 pages or so. definitely worth the read, i'd say

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Read Carmilla first

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This. And read Polidori’s The Vampyre before Carmilla

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      This. And read Polidori’s The Vampyre before Carmilla

      Or he could just read Dracula

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Literally me after asking if reading The Hunger Games was worth my time. I'm gonna make it guy, I hope to read them before 2047!

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The first maybe 100 pages are excellent. Definitely worth reading.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    great book until the last couple chapters where it slows down to crawl

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Beginning of the book is great. Last 100 pages or so, not that much. Dracula is not scary but he's definitely a creepy dude. The dialogue is unintentionally funny.
    I recommend it especially because it contextualizes a lot of horror and thriller tropes. Dracula influenced a lot of stuff, even indirectly.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Blood sucking being a metaphor for pussy eating.

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Beware of Eastern Europeans the novel

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anοnymous

    the first part of the novel all the way up until it changes perspective away from Johnathan is really damn tense and good

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's been so long since I read it but from what I remember the first part is really good, the part where Dracula preys on the girl is good, the (((Renfield))) parts are good and the finale is good. I remember it dragging somewhere near the middle or before the finale or something.

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    really great book but the ending was wayy more bland than i expected and didn't lived up to the hype created by the author but as another anon states the first few 100-200 pages are a blast

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    Dracula is killed by a cowboy from texas

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Will i like this book if I liked Frankenstein, are they similar at all? I see the two get compared quite a bit.
    Also, I quite liked Werner Herzogs Nosferatu, though I don't know how faithful that is to Dracula.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I personally like Frankenstein a lot more than Dracula. Dracula can drag on account of how it’s presented as a series of letters and diary entries, where Frankenstein’s action is almost nonstop and frequently dousing you in misery

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    The “Call of the Crocodile” of it’s time

  19. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A book that starts strong and then declines bit by bit. Jonathon's night ride is kino as an audiobook to play as you speed down the highway past midnight, but it really dips after they switch to Mina's POV and then again after they put down Lucy.

  20. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    American tourist knife-murders local authority person in his sleep.

  21. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Ignoring all the victorians being a bunch of sex perverts

  22. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    while you're reading it, try to keep an eye out for Dionysian references, which Dracula represents.
    >Dracula's ship the Demeter, mother of of Dionysus
    >has 3 nymphos attending him
    >lots of sexual subtext, just as Dionysiac cults and their drunken orgies
    >wine and blood were often considered similar in look. Dionysus demigod of wine
    >Dionysiac cult orgies take place at night, Dracula is a night creature primarily.
    prolly more, but off top of my head that's a start.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      woops. demeter not the mother of dionysus, but there was still a connection with him someway. Can't remember exact details just remember reading an essay about it once.

      something like how Dionysus was originally Zagreus, and that guys mother was Persephone, whose mother is Demeter? or maybe a connection with Demeter and fertility (i.e. sex)? or an Underworld connection, just as Dracula has an underworld quality. *shrug*

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Maybe there is a bit of Demeter in the scene with the gypsy mother whose newborn was kidnapped by Dracula? Since Demeter herself had her child kidnapped, only with happier ending.
        There was also a cult of the dead that worshiped Demeter, to be more precise, they linked her to their belief that a new life can sprout from a dead body, like a new plant can grow from a seed.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          wiki article says Zagreus was in some stories literally identified as Hades. (you know how myths are, there are so many different versions)

          Hades lord of underworld, death.

          Wish i could find that essay again. I'll link if i can.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          wiki article says Zagreus was in some stories literally identified as Hades. (you know how myths are, there are so many different versions)

          Hades lord of underworld, death.

          Wish i could find that essay again. I'll link if i can.

          this might be what i read, too tired to read the whole thing but it seems like it is.

          https://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/on-dracula-and-dionysus

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            yep, just read it, that's the essay (or blog, rather).
            Starts out talking about some tv series and movies with vampires, but a few paragraphs down delves into the Bible (Dracula as Devil) and then brings up the Dionysus and Zagreus, even quotes a Homeric hymn to Dionysus that was reimagined by Stoker on the bloody boat scene. Interesting read.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              oh here's an interesting comment someone made in response to that blog/essay i posted. I had a similar idea mulling around in my head (as a possibility) but not as well thought out as this guy's comment.
              like the analogy between Dracula and Dionysus, and would take it a bit further. How about Dracula and Jesus as the Christ? Perhaps the Gypsies, who had the legend originally, had a faction of disenfranchised, wandering, garden gnomes among them (Gypsies=Jacobsies?). The connection between Satan and Dracula (the "dragon's seed") could still be made, as the garden gnomes, it is thought, did not look kindly upon Jesus, who was picking off converts from Judaism (after all Satan was their tradition).

              The concept of drinking the blood and eating the flesh (which was criticized by the garden gnomes as cannibalism) of a sacrificed person in order to gain immortality, could easily have been lampooned into the character of Dracula who could be killed with a "wooden stake" and how about that intense phobia of the cross?

              Finally, Christ is often compared to Dionysus and as a scion of the House of David, it fits nicely with my own theory that King David was instrumental in the introduction of the "god" Dionysus (See: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-gSYCPPKnwzHnEiBndgB-ZPUHXEduOziDoQFhTxSPCs/pub ).

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                [...]
                this might be what i read, too tired to read the whole thing but it seems like it is.

                https://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/on-dracula-and-dionysus

                yep, just read it, that's the essay (or blog, rather).
                Starts out talking about some tv series and movies with vampires, but a few paragraphs down delves into the Bible (Dracula as Devil) and then brings up the Dionysus and Zagreus, even quotes a Homeric hymn to Dionysus that was reimagined by Stoker on the bloody boat scene. Interesting read.

                >like the analogy between Dracula and Dionysus, and would take it a bit further. How about Dracula and Jesus as the Christ? Perhaps the Gypsies, who had the legend originally, had a faction of disenfranchised, wandering, garden gnomes among them (Gypsies=Jacobsies?). The connection between Satan and Dracula (the "dragon's seed") could still be made, as the garden gnomes, it is thought, did not look kindly upon Jesus, who was picking off converts from Judaism (after all Satan was their tradition).

                >The concept of drinking the blood and eating the flesh (which was criticized by the garden gnomes as cannibalism) of a sacrificed person in order to gain immortality, could easily have been lampooned into the character of Dracula who could be killed with a "wooden stake" and how about that intense phobia of the cross?

                >Finally, Christ is often compared to Dionysus and as a scion of the House of David, it fits nicely with my own theory that King David was instrumental in the introduction of the "god" Dionysus (See: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-gSYCPPKnwzHnEiBndgB-ZPUHXEduOziDoQFhTxSPCs/pub ).
                woops, meant to green text it and to link to essay link post

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-gSYCPPKnwzHnEiBndgB-ZPUHXEduOziDoQFhTxSPCs/pub
                dang, that's a real interesting read too.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                since i know how much people hate reading random links, i'll see if i can summarize the essay.

                Basically the link talks about how King David of Israel and King Cadmus of Thebes (Greece) are essentially the same person, even though written about hundreds of years apart. The stories about King Cadmus and how he basically converted to Dionysianism (the Greek version of the story) mimic in many details the story of King David and how he instituted religious reforms, stuff like how he "danced naked before the Ark of God".

                The essay is basically saying that King David had introduced Osiris worship out of Egypt, which was antagonistic to the patriarchal and nomadic (and traditional) Hebrew culture, and that Phoenicians that migrated (or fled?) to Thebes (Greece) carried this well known story about David and reintroduced it to the Greek culture with only very minor changes (name changes, basically, but the story and events mimic the King David story).

                And that Absalom usurped King David's throne with the help of the Saulite faction (that David had overthrown earlier) who were traditionalist patriarchal culture adherents.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [...]
      this might be what i read, too tired to read the whole thing but it seems like it is.

      https://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/on-dracula-and-dionysus

      >https://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/on-dracula-and-dionysus

      >However, it is interesting to stop and consider how it is that the literary Dracula, who is explicitly likened to the Devil in Bram Stoker, became godfather to a race of offspring who are, for all intents and purposes, pagan gods come to earth to mate with our women, like Apollo and Dionysus.
      >Stoker makes very plain that his vampire is meant to be read as the Devil. He attends the Scholomance, the Devil’s own diabolical school, and he speaks in the borrowed words of the Devil himself. When he comes to Renfield in the insane asylum, Dracula says to him “All these lives will I give you, ay, and many more and greater, through countless ages, if you will fall down and worship me!” This is nearly word for word what the Devil says to Jesus in the desert in Matthew 4:9: “And [the devil] saith unto him [Jesus], All these things will I give thee, if thou wilt fall down and worship me.” Thus is Dracula also held in check by the power of the crucifix and of communion wafers. Oh, and he also goes by the alias Count de Ville in London; even some literary scholars miss the joke: Count Devil.
      >... the vampire is Dionysus, the very god who conducts woodland orgies with his maenads and who is most wild and violent in his punishment of those who cross him. His followers, in their insane ecstasies, drink the blood of their victims and consecrate it to the god—not unlike the three wives of Dracula who menace Jonathan Harker in Castle Dracula. And of course the Greeks considered wine to be the equivalent of blood (as do Christians), a suitable substitute for blood-hungry revenants when visiting the underworld, so Dionysus as wine-god is nearly indistinguishable from the aristocratic vampire who reigns by blood. Both god and vampire were said to come from the mysterious east, from the wild and savage borderlands beyond the safety of civilization.

      >The Homeric Hymn to Dionysus (hymn 7) presents a set of images that are indistinguishable from the magical feats performed by Stoker’s Dracula. The hymn discusses the god’s capture by pirates: "They sought to bind him with rude bonds, but the bonds would not hold him, and the withes fell far away from his hands and feet: and he sat with a smile in his dark eyes. […] But soon strange things were seen among them. First of all sweet, fragrant wine ran streaming throughout all the black ship and a heavenly smell arose, so that all the seamen were seized with amazement when they saw it. And all at once a vine spread out both ways along the top of the sail with many clusters hanging down from it, and a dark ivy-plant twined about the mast, blossoming with flowers, and with rich berries growing on it; and all the thole-pins were covered with garlands. When the pirates saw all this, then at last they bade the helmsman to put the ship to land."

      (con't)

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        (con't)

        >"... But the god changed into a dreadful lion there on the ship, in the bows, and roared loudly: amidships also he showed his wonders and created a shaggy bear which stood up ravening, while on the forepeak was the lion glaring fiercely with scowling brows."

        >Dracula can turn into a wolf; he commands all of the frightening animals. He controls fog and storms like Athena and Zeus. He is an alchemist and magician with powers like those of Dionysus. He is, like Dionysus, quick to anger but rewards his followers’ worldly goods. Most intriguingly, Dionysus is one of the few immortals to have died. Just as Dracula can be killed by a stake through the heart, Dionysus survived the Titans’ near-complete dismemberment and consumption of his body because his heart survived (Diodorus 5.75.4 with Damascius on Phaedo at 1.170). Death and resurrection made Dionysus immortal, and so too does it with Dracula.

        >Most interesting is that unbeknownst to Bram Stoker, Dionysus was identified with the obscure and ancient god Zagreus (whose death and resurrection became Dionysus’) and with Sabazios (as was Zeus), the horse-riding warrior god of the Thracians who battles the Dragon (dracul), from which the real-life Dracula took his name since the Order of the Dragon took its imagery from that of Sabazios by way of St. George. The Thracian Sabazios is sometimes also thought to be related to the Dacian Zalmoxis, the god who descended into the underworld and was reborn—and whose underground chamber filled with disciples I have previously demonstrated was the model for the actual folkloric Scholomance that Dracula attended!

        >I can’t prove it, but I have a feeling that Polidori had the Greek gods in mind in placing Lord Ruthven in Greece. Since it was a widespread Abrahamic belief that the pagan gods were actually demons and/or fallen angels (Psalm 96:5; Augustine, City of God 7.33; Qur’an 53, etc.), it’s no surprise that the Devil and his demons acquired the powers and traits of the Greco-Roman divinities. Thus, when Stoker made Dracula into the Devil, he unconsciously carried over the basic framework of the pagan gods to his new infernal creation. (Indeed, many scholars similarly suspect, but cannot prove, that Dionysus stands behind the medieval devil of witchcraft.) We, in our modern world, have dispensed largely with the moral horror Victorian readers saw in Dracula and have instead highlighted the buried layers of the pagan undertone, bringing to the surface the idea of the deity that marries a human bride, like Dionysus with Ariadne, making the bride into an immortal. In late versions of the Ariadne story, Dionysus in fact steals Ariadne from Theseus (Diodorus 4.61.5; Pausanias 1.20.3; 10.29.4) just as Dracula tries to take Mina from Jonathan.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          [...]
          >https://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/on-dracula-and-dionysus

          >However, it is interesting to stop and consider how it is that the literary Dracula, who is explicitly likened to the Devil in Bram Stoker, became godfather to a race of offspring who are, for all intents and purposes, pagan gods come to earth to mate with our women, like Apollo and Dionysus.
          >Stoker makes very plain that his vampire is meant to be read as the Devil. He attends the Scholomance, the Devil’s own diabolical school, and he speaks in the borrowed words of the Devil himself. When he comes to Renfield in the insane asylum, Dracula says to him “All these lives will I give you, ay, and many more and greater, through countless ages, if you will fall down and worship me!” This is nearly word for word what the Devil says to Jesus in the desert in Matthew 4:9: “And [the devil] saith unto him [Jesus], All these things will I give thee, if thou wilt fall down and worship me.” Thus is Dracula also held in check by the power of the crucifix and of communion wafers. Oh, and he also goes by the alias Count de Ville in London; even some literary scholars miss the joke: Count Devil.
          >... the vampire is Dionysus, the very god who conducts woodland orgies with his maenads and who is most wild and violent in his punishment of those who cross him. His followers, in their insane ecstasies, drink the blood of their victims and consecrate it to the god—not unlike the three wives of Dracula who menace Jonathan Harker in Castle Dracula. And of course the Greeks considered wine to be the equivalent of blood (as do Christians), a suitable substitute for blood-hungry revenants when visiting the underworld, so Dionysus as wine-god is nearly indistinguishable from the aristocratic vampire who reigns by blood. Both god and vampire were said to come from the mysterious east, from the wild and savage borderlands beyond the safety of civilization.

          >The Homeric Hymn to Dionysus (hymn 7) presents a set of images that are indistinguishable from the magical feats performed by Stoker’s Dracula. The hymn discusses the god’s capture by pirates: "They sought to bind him with rude bonds, but the bonds would not hold him, and the withes fell far away from his hands and feet: and he sat with a smile in his dark eyes. […] But soon strange things were seen among them. First of all sweet, fragrant wine ran streaming throughout all the black ship and a heavenly smell arose, so that all the seamen were seized with amazement when they saw it. And all at once a vine spread out both ways along the top of the sail with many clusters hanging down from it, and a dark ivy-plant twined about the mast, blossoming with flowers, and with rich berries growing on it; and all the thole-pins were covered with garlands. When the pirates saw all this, then at last they bade the helmsman to put the ship to land."

          (con't)

          since i know how much people hate reading random links, i'll see if i can summarize the essay.

          Basically the link talks about how King David of Israel and King Cadmus of Thebes (Greece) are essentially the same person, even though written about hundreds of years apart. The stories about King Cadmus and how he basically converted to Dionysianism (the Greek version of the story) mimic in many details the story of King David and how he instituted religious reforms, stuff like how he "danced naked before the Ark of God".

          The essay is basically saying that King David had introduced Osiris worship out of Egypt, which was antagonistic to the patriarchal and nomadic (and traditional) Hebrew culture, and that Phoenicians that migrated (or fled?) to Thebes (Greece) carried this well known story about David and reintroduced it to the Greek culture with only very minor changes (name changes, basically, but the story and events mimic the King David story).

          And that Absalom usurped King David's throne with the help of the Saulite faction (that David had overthrown earlier) who were traditionalist patriarchal culture adherents.

          [...]
          [...]
          >like the analogy between Dracula and Dionysus, and would take it a bit further. How about Dracula and Jesus as the Christ? Perhaps the Gypsies, who had the legend originally, had a faction of disenfranchised, wandering, garden gnomes among them (Gypsies=Jacobsies?). The connection between Satan and Dracula (the "dragon's seed") could still be made, as the garden gnomes, it is thought, did not look kindly upon Jesus, who was picking off converts from Judaism (after all Satan was their tradition).

          >The concept of drinking the blood and eating the flesh (which was criticized by the garden gnomes as cannibalism) of a sacrificed person in order to gain immortality, could easily have been lampooned into the character of Dracula who could be killed with a "wooden stake" and how about that intense phobia of the cross?

          >Finally, Christ is often compared to Dionysus and as a scion of the House of David, it fits nicely with my own theory that King David was instrumental in the introduction of the "god" Dionysus (See: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-gSYCPPKnwzHnEiBndgB-ZPUHXEduOziDoQFhTxSPCs/pub ).
          woops, meant to green text it and to link to essay link post

          >https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-gSYCPPKnwzHnEiBndgB-ZPUHXEduOziDoQFhTxSPCs/pub
          dang, that's a real interesting read too.

          i've read about this idea that Jesus is a Dionysus/Osiris archetype, but was that how he originally was or just how Catholic/Christian Church portrayed him after the fact?

          The stories about Jesus, like how he turned water into wine, calmed a storm (i.e. walked on water) definitely have a flavor of Dionysus, the dying and living again resemble Osiris dying and living again, even Christmas utilizes many of the same symbolic imagery the Egyptians and ancient world used, such as the evergreen tree (like what was left of Osiris was buried inside), the fact it's celebrated in winter, essentially a fertility right to celebrate that even though things look dead in winter there's still life that will show up in spring, when everything is revived and reborn.

          It's a strange unsettling idea to be sure, to find out that what you thought was an Apollonian religion (to use Nietzschean terms) is actually a Dionysian religion.

          If that is the case, was Jesus condemning the Pharisees as being Apollonian? Of not knowing how to relax and revel in the brotherhood of humanity but instead always scheming for the next dollar and step up the social ladder?

          Is Stoker portraying Dracula (i.e. this Dionysus/Jesus archetype) then as a negative against Christian religion? Which seems odd given that Dracula is weak against the cross, but begins to make an eery sense if the cross is being as a threat by Apollonian/Victorian/patriarchal men: "If you don't stop this we're gonna put you up on that cross again, it's going to be very painful, then see how much you like to party."

          The original Hebrews were a nomadic people, patriarchal, very conservative in values, but when they eventually settled and began living in cities of Canaan (which were like any other city found anywhere, decadent and liberal) the Hebrews split culturally, and some like Ahab, David and Solomon, became city dwelling and licentious, practicing fertility religion as they ended their nomadic ways and switched to farming and city trade. The rural Hebrews, represented by Saul, Absalom stuck to the old ways.

          Very novel way of looking at it that i'm not used to, though it would at least make some sense of the events in the Bible that always baffled me.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            interesting. So take the idea of Dionysus/Zagreus as the King of Underworld, King of Afterlife and Spirit world. Like the Egyptian Osiris. Fits with Dracula motif. Does it fit with Jesus? Maybe using Afterlife sounds better than Underworld, which conveys to moderns the idea of hell, but in ancient times it didn't have that connotation, it merely referred to spirit world of the afterlife. Even the original Nordic "Hel" didn't convey what moderns think when they hear "Hell", and the same with Hades.

            And this entire conception of an afterlife, from what i've read, is foreign to many garden gnomes (the pharisaic garden gnomes? at any rate, to some). They don't believe in anything except Earth and that's it. This idea was then used to explain why they're so dedicated and focused to worldly wealth and power, because all the promises of the Bible towards the garden gnomes were interpreted by them as being something that could only happen in this world, not in spiritual afterlife. Which was also why they rejected and denounced Jesus, because they were looking for military leader, not a Dionysian reformer.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            interesting. So take the idea of Dionysus/Zagreus as the King of Underworld, King of Afterlife and Spirit world. Like the Egyptian Osiris. Fits with Dracula motif. Does it fit with Jesus? Maybe using Afterlife sounds better than Underworld, which conveys to moderns the idea of hell, but in ancient times it didn't have that connotation, it merely referred to spirit world of the afterlife. Even the original Nordic "Hel" didn't convey what moderns think when they hear "Hell", and the same with Hades.

            And this entire conception of an afterlife, from what i've read, is foreign to many garden gnomes (the pharisaic garden gnomes? at any rate, to some). They don't believe in anything except Earth and that's it. This idea was then used to explain why they're so dedicated and focused to worldly wealth and power, because all the promises of the Bible towards the garden gnomes were interpreted by them as being something that could only happen in this world, not in spiritual afterlife. Which was also why they rejected and denounced Jesus, because they were looking for military leader, not a Dionysian reformer.

            does this tie into Christian Gnosticism? Jesus as Lord of the Afterlife, Pharisaic garden gnomes deny Jesus and the Afterlife, scheme only for the here and now and worldly things. Run the world in fact, or at least can get an audience with the rulers of the world and convince them to arrest and execute anyone that annoys them (Romans arresting Jesus and executing after the Pharisees requested it, Pilate even tries to get them to spare his life by offering to execute Barabbas instead, they won't have it)

            Let's see, where else would this idea tie in... seems to tie in with those that say modern day garden gnomes differ from ancient Hebrews, and that this change occurred after the Bablyonian Captivity, when a select group of them morphed into Talmud reading ultra racists. This would explain why Jesus didn't get along with them, since he was more Dionysian in temperament.

            And the gnostic theme ties into the whole "leave worldly things behind, focus on being a good person towards others, love God and your neighbor, forgive, that it's harder for a rich man to enter into afterlife heaven (which Jesus is the ruler of) than it is for camel to walk through eye of needle" stuff.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Then garden gnomes do worship the Demiurge, the god of the physical world and worldly things, and the gnostic Supreme Being of the Pleroma (the Afterlife Spirit world) is ruled by Jesus, where a person is judged not on how much wealth they accrued by whatever means, but by how they treated others. And as Nietzsche says, a slave morality, some people are just not as vicious towards others and those types excel at being slaves and ruled by others who are okay with being vicious demons towards others.

  23. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i actually enjoyed it very much
    very solid intro it but it hits the brakes when it starts to switch to Minas POV and its kinda anticlimatic but would recommend nonetheless

  24. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    An amazing short story about being stuck in castle with vampire and its dissapointing sequel, with short story about ship as only good quality

  25. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    boring diary. dracula sucks.

    what is good vamp lit? i've read the good anne rice books.

  26. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The longer, shittier and incelier version of Carmilla.

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