43 thoughts on “Wearing suit to engineer position interview?

        • Anonymous says:

          I have my own firm, I do hiring. Nobody has ever lost points for wearing a suit to a job interview.

          This is bad advice, you’ll look too casual. Wear the suit.

          https://i.imgur.com/pXKQg2e.jpg

          Derbies, but in my taste preferably canvas sneaker, get them in leather for rainy days.

          Even worse advice. Do not wear sneakers to a job interview.

          You’re an adult going to speak to another adult. Wear a suit, wear proper shoes

          • Anonymous says:

            Honestly depending where you live and at the size and culture of the company.
            Get a darker suit if you want to be on the safe side, you can skip the tie tho >90% of the time.
            If you wanna choose more casual route (e.g. if you apply at a startup), a white shirt with navy chinos and clean leather shoes should also be fine in many cases.

            Generally, it’s always better to be slightly overdressed in professional occasions than being underdressed.

          • Anonymous says:

            Pic related is from Linkedin, if you’re actually working in a first world country, suits are less popular nowadays.
            Even CEOs, advisors etc. don’t wear a full suit anymore. So you as a small employee sit there with a full suit and tie? Congrats with being overdressed, and getting bullied.

          • Anonymous says:

            genx hates suits, they unironically think they’re rock stars rebelling against the system by not wearing a suit.

          • Anonymous says:

            You hecking sperg, you don’t wear a suit once you have the position, you wear it for the interview.

            https://i.imgur.com/lmISSjD.jpg

            Should I wear a suit to my chemical engineering interview? If so is this color too bright or does it need to be darker

            And yes OP, that suit is far too bright. You’re going to an interview, not a wedding

          • Anonymous says:

            So you will be in full suit while the supervisor who interview you is in shirt and jeans or even t shirt and chinos?

          • Anonymous says:

            2/3 of the people in this photo are wearing jackets, that alone tells me that a suit is the right choice for an interview at that place

            if EVERYON is in t shirts and shorts, then you maybe opt for something like what the guy on the left is wearing but if even a few people are in a sport coat then yeah, a suit is the optimal decision

          • Anonymous says:

            I was just looking at pictures of CEOs and thinking this.

            In the 21st Century, do we look at suits the way the 20th Century suit wearers looked at frock coats?

            Something to be worn by footmen (beginning of the 20th Century) and for ceremonial occasions?

          • Anonymous says:

            lol are you hecking serious ? ignore these clowns OP, get a darker color, a belt also you could do without a tie, it is up to you

          • Anonymous says:

            plutocrats and feudal lords dressing as they please is the natural outcome of going many generations without mass military service. wearing a suit communicates competency when everyone in the workforce was socialized via war mobilization. it shows that you were physically and mentally capable of performing military service and separates you from the scum who stayed behind and worked as a clerk or a farm hand.

            in a time when military service is seen as a desperate measure for the very poor, uniforms will be associated with poverty and not much else. wearing what you please doesn’t automatically make you look like a CEO but keep in mind even in the days of suits, wearing a suit also didn’t automatically make you look like a CEO. think "necessary" not "sufficient".

          • Anonymous says:

            Early 20th Century clerks wore suits (and went to war). Back in the day a clerk or a farm hand would wear suits on a daily basis and apart from the material and cut wore the same items of clothing as a prince or a president. Jacket, collared shirt, tie, trousers, leather shoes or boots. The uniform was a known.

            Today, wearing a uniform of a collared shirt/tie/jacket often marks you out as the help, the barkeeper or the waiter.

          • Anonymous says:

            https://i.imgur.com/xqVMGNn.jpg

            Early 20th Century clerks wore suits (and went to war). Back in the day a clerk or a farm hand would wear suits on a daily basis and apart from the material and cut wore the same items of clothing as a prince or a president. Jacket, collared shirt, tie, trousers, leather shoes or boots. The uniform was a known.

            Today, wearing a uniform of a collared shirt/tie/jacket often marks you out as the help, the barkeeper or the waiter.

            Also, if you watch 20th Century film, the help is always dressed one step smarter.

            Early 20th Century footmen wore frock coats while the diners wore white tie tailcoats. When dinner became tuxedos/black tie, the waiters moved to white tie. When dinner meant wearing a suit with a tie, the waiters wore tuxedos/black tie.

  1. Anonymous says:

    […]

    Nta but this is nowhere near universal. There are still many professional environments where suits are worn and many people in charge of hiring who still look favorably upon them. It’s a dumb risk to take to an interview when you could just play it safe.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Don’t forget to wear a watch anon, even if you don’t wear one regularly it comes off as good taste in a formal interview.

    Actually more importantly than fashion, read up on how to do a good interview if you have not already

    • Anonymous says:

      https://i.imgur.com/lmISSjD.jpg

      Should I wear a suit to my chemical engineering interview? If so is this color too bright or does it need to be darker

      If you don’t have a nice watch get an orient or a seiko under $200

  3. Anonymous says:

    how is chemical engineering a real job, wtf?
    engineers are as stupid as code monkeys, probably more because they think they are smart.

      • Anonymous says:

        He’s probably a freshman in chemistry. I have a friend with a phd in chem and another with a BS in chemical engineering. They both just work for semiconductor companies.

      • Anonymous says:

        no, it’s not.
        i only accept 3 real ‘jobs’. it’s important to know, that i only define a job by the theological meaning.
        1. priest/scholar class
        2. soldier/warrior class
        3. politican/philosopher-king class
        basically platons politeia classes modified with christofascist ideology.
        everything else is not a job.
        the weak will be enslaved and do their job and the wicked will be eradicated.
        anything else in modern society is just wagecucking and modern basedslavery.

  4. Anonymous says:

    That looks like an Italian cut suit and Europeans are gay. I would go for a classic American style suit if I were you. Plain. Practical. Masculine.

  5. Anonymous says:

    Dress well, but try to not dress better than the boss/interviewer.
    Imagine sitting in the room, everyone wearing their casual t-shirts and jeans, and you sitting there like a churchboy in a suit, it creates a weird dynamic. That being said, I’d go with a suit – but go for a slightly more toned down color

    Dress should also fit the requirements of the position.
    – manual labor: you likely don’t need the suit.
    – mental labor: possibly, especially if client/customer facing, or if the company has a dresscode.

    > Formal
    >> high-formal: black everyday suit is your go-to.
    >> regular-formal: navy blue or blue, avoid bright colours. light patterns OK. It’s a meeting, not a celebration. Keep accessories to the basics.

    > semi-formal
    >> charcoal or navy suit, no accessories or tie – leave top-button undone on the shirt.

    > Smart-casual
    >> oxford shirt and chinos

    For shoes, since I see you’ve been asking;
    Shoes should complement your suit color, or the accessory colour.
    Can never go wrong with a deep/mid-brown leather, or bourbon shoe.
    I prefer oxford cap toe or double monkstrap. but derbys are also a decent option.

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