Was Rasputin as mysterious and cool as pop history makes him out to be or was he just a dude who has been overhyped?

Was Rasputin as mysterious and cool as pop history makes him out to be or was he just a dude who has been overhyped?

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    legit big dick energy.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If by "mysterious and cool" you mean "couldn't keep it in his pants" then yes

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    He is my role model. He is the personification of what every man should strive to be

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    My russian history is shabby and still growing, but I'll give my take. Rasputin is probably the most overhyped figure in Russian history. Russians literally do not care about this guy and he's often brought up everywhere else. He was a pretty charismatic, promiscuous, and strange guy who people thought had magical powers. The circumstances surrounding his death are interesting and a bit funny, but in the grand scheme of what was the Russian Revolution he was irrelevant. I seriously don't understand why he's been so sensationalized. Though I suppose you could say the scandal was sensationalized himself. The idea he had powers mostly came from 'healing' Tsar Nicholas II's son, Alexis. The press did so aswell due to said scandal since Nicholas for some retarded reason left his wife with Rasputin from IIRC to go to the frontlines. Pretty retarded. People eventually thought they were having an affair and he was said to be some wizard or manipulator.
    When they tried to kill him imagine believing or hearing about all this and the guy just doesn't die. You'd probably believe it. Though it's been said they were probably very drunk.

    tldr unironically random homeless guy that somehow became a known part of russian history due to a scandal and how wacky he was.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >People eventually thought they were having an affair and he was said to be some wizard or manipulator.
      Me again, but correction on this part, I think the rumors regarding him manipulating the Tsar were going on even before Nicholas left. They just got along really well. Anyone else can feel free to correct my history so I can learn something.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      i think it's because people generally dont care about russian history, so they cling to the one piece of it they actually know. and besides, it's pretty interesting story.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >since Nicholas for some retarded reason left his wife with Rasputin
      Except Rasputin never lived with Tsar's family, royal palace was never his home, even temporal. So Tsar never "left his wife with Rasputin"

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Except Rasputin never lived with Tsar's family, royal palace was never his home, even temporal. So Tsar never "left his wife with Rasputin"
        I just say it as I remember it, I do appreciate the correction however.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I just dont believe his death story. Sounds like BS

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Some people just won't die, look at how hard it was kill to Michael Malloy
        >Beginning in January 1933, while Malloy was unemployed, alcoholic and homeless, five of his acquaintances plotted to kill Malloy by getting him to drink himself to death to collect life insurance. They collected insurance policies on Malloy's life and stood to gain over US$3,500 if Malloy died an accidental death.
        >Marino owned a speakeasy and gave Malloy unlimited credit, thinking the alcoholic Malloy would abuse it and drink himself to death. Although Malloy drank for a majority of his waking day, it did not kill him. Marino then replaced Malloy's liquor with antifreeze, but Malloy would continue to drink with no problems.[2][3] >Antifreeze was replaced with turpentine, followed by horse liniment, and finally rat poison was mixed in. After these mixtures failed to kill Malloy, Marino mixed shots of wood alcohol (pure methanol) in with his normal shots of liquor. This did not kill Malloy, presumably because the normal liquor helped negate the methanol poisoning.[2][7]
        >The group then gave Malloy raw oysters soaked in wood alcohol[2][3] - the idea apparently coming from Pasqua, who claimed he saw a man die after eating oysters with whiskey.[2] A sandwich of spoiled sardines mixed with poison and carpet tacks was then tried.[2][3][8]
        >Concluding that it was unlikely that anything Malloy ingested was going to kill him quickly enough before the insurance policies ran out, the group decided to freeze him to death. On an extremely cold night, after Malloy drank until passing out, he was carried to a park, dumped in the snow, and had 5 US gallons (19 l) of water poured on his bare chest. However, shortly thereafter, Malloy was rescued by police who took him to a homeless charity where he was re-clothed.
        >The group then attempted to kill Malloy by running him down with Green's taxi, moving at 45 miles per hour (72 km/h). This put Malloy in the hospital for three weeks with broken bones.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Honestly after all I seen in my life plus this and other stories. I think alchohol gives humans magical durability powers like fuck. Punch a man wrong and you'll kill him, hit a drunk with a truck and the fuck will be fine.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I seriously don't understand why he's been so sensationalized
      The idea of some mysterious charlatan mystic being the power behind the Russian throne during an important moment in Russian and world history has an appeal to Westerners, especially since they already viewed Russia as a backward, semi-Asiatic society where that sort of thing would be entirely realistic.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    He was a con artist who just wanted money and to fuck bitches and he STILL was one of the most competent advisors of the Tsar.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    He’s weird in the way he infiltrated the Russian royal family and establishment, but the western fascination about the dude is exaggerated to the highest level.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    He had a big dick and was probably slaying pussy since his early teens.
    He knew how to manipulate women and use them to join the aristocracy circle.
    Thats it, nothing much.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Rasputin is Lenin

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The people who assassinated the Inspector-General Franz Ferdinand timed the attempt on Rasputin to occur simultaneously. They missed by app. 20 minutes. Obviously someone thought he was important.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    THERE LIVED A CERTAIN MAN, IN RUSSIA LONG AGO

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The press and the coffee houses all held that Rasputin was some sex maniac, a defiler of women, and that he had lain with Anya Vyrubova, the Empress' closest friend. But after the revolution, Vyrubova was inspected and found to be a virgin.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      On 2 March 1910 the Moscow Gazette ran a story about Rasputin, and from then on he was to become known throughout all Russia, and he was to be the unfortunate victim of liars who sought to bring down Russia and her Imperial house.
      It was charged against Rasputin that he was a drunkard. But what weight do such accusations hold, when what can be known far clearer is that he ran a temperance society.
      It was said against him that he was a heretical Khlyst, but such an accusation has no grounds and at any rate can be tossed out.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Rasputin was not merely a novelty. He was a stout defender of Russia, of Orthodoxy, and of the Imperial family, in a time when it seemed all the world was against them. He was close with Black Hundreds, though is not known to have been a member of any Black Hundred organisation. But undoubtedly he was a Rightist, a loyalist that came of the people, and of a movement which was underlain by populism and buffeted by a great Christian reawakening.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    He was a big deal at the time because he got a lot of people mad
    The nobles, bureaucrats, ministers etc. obviously didn't like the idea of a commoner having as much influence over the Tsar/Tsarina as he did through such unorthodox means
    And everybody who already didn't like the monarchy (by this point somewhere in the order of 80% of the population) used him to further agitate against the German Tsarina Alexandra, who was already very low in public opinion after the war began and "Germanophobia" took over, who could now be plausibly accused of infidelity in addition to treason.
    But the actual events of February 1917 have almost nothing do with him and that's really the beginning of anything interesting to do with the end of the Russian monarchy

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The way that he lost his virginety makes him beyond based regarles of the magic powers

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      how did he lose his virginity? i know alot about rasputin but i never heard or seen anything about that. also nice pic, where'd you get it from?

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    He reported to have begged the tsar not to mobilize before workd war 1 and that fell on deaf ears.
    Thr guy did not have as much pull as people claim.

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