Was Qianlong a good emperor? He had such a long reign but he seems to have make a lot of idiotic choices.


Warning: Attempt to read property "comment_date" on null in /var/www/wptbox/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1043

Warning: Attempt to read property "comment_date" on null in /var/www/wptbox/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1043

Warning: Attempt to read property "comment_date" on null in /var/www/wptbox/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1043

Was Qianlong a good emperor? He had such a long reign but he seems to have make a lot of idiotic choices.

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    He was a mighty SHANDONGER warrior prince and Qingkang

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >He was a mighty SHANDONGER warrior prince and Qingkang
      this was confirmed not true btw

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    i don't know anything about a single chinese head of state between qin shi huang and puyi

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why the qianlong face?

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    A quick skim through his wikipedia seems to give me the impression that he was actually pretty competent.
    What are the idiotic choices you're referring to?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Most of the 10 Great Campaigns, expecially Burma and Dai Viet.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        The 10 Great Campaigns is what led to this. Kangxi expanded China's borders while Qianlong spread its influence beyond its borders. Since even military losses for China could hardly mean anything due to being huge while being a pyrrhic victory for the smaller states, the campaigns were often to just force them into accepting tributary status to ensure a repeat attack doesn't happen.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >The 10 Great Campaigns is what led to this. Kangxi expanded China's borders while Qianlong spread its influence beyond its borders.

          This is a lie. Outer Mongolia and Tibet were annexed during the Kangxi reign in the war against the Dzungars.

          Yongzheng continued the war against the Dzungars and annexed Qinghai.

          The only thing annexed during Qianlong was Xinjiang and he ordered the genocide of the Dzungars.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Qianlong spread its influence beyond its borders.

          Qianlong refused to help Chinese and Muslim rebels against the Dutch in Java. After the 1740 Batavia massacre, Chinese rebels rose up in revenge and started slaughtering Dutch. Muslims of Java rose up and joined the Chinese pagans against the Dutch. The Dutch were almost slaughtered out of Java, but were saved by their local lackeys from Madura.

          The Qing could have sent fleets to expel the Dutch from the region, but Qianlong said that people who left the Qing were traitors and he didn't care.

          The Madurese suffered karmic punishment centuries later in the Sampit and Sambas riots.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            >The Qing could have sent fleets to expel the Dutch from the region, but Qianlong said that people who left the Qing were traitors and he didn't care.
            haha what a cunt

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            >The 10 Great Campaigns is what led to this. Kangxi expanded China's borders while Qianlong spread its influence beyond its borders.

            This is a lie. Outer Mongolia and Tibet were annexed during the Kangxi reign in the war against the Dzungars.

            Yongzheng continued the war against the Dzungars and annexed Qinghai.

            The only thing annexed during Qianlong was Xinjiang and he ordered the genocide of the Dzungars.

            [...]
            [...]
            Qianlong ordered mass genocides, he ordered the destruction of texts and editing his own incorrect bullshit "corrections" into historical texts (histories of Liao, Jin, Yuan) based on completely wrong linguistic analysis.

            [...]
            >brave on the battlefield.

            Qianlong didn't direct a single battle in the field and instead threw tantrums and screeched at field commanders who actually led battles.

            >witty in conversation

            You're mistaking him for his father the Yongzheng Emperor.

            The Yongzheng Emperor abolished waist chopping execution as inhumane and raised salaries for eunuchs and even pardoned someone who tried to incite a rebellion against the Qing, explaining to him that he regarded everyone as brethren and China as his own state.

            Kangxi actually went into the battlefield himself to direct battles.

            Qianlong reversed the pardon and sentenced the person to death, he ordered burning of texts in literary inquisition, he screamed at generals in the battlefield (both a Manchu general and Han banner general were forced to suicide or executed over the Jinchuan campaign) and he did the same in the Burma campaign,he ordered mass genocide of Oirats.

            Based chinkspammer effortposting

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            >The Qing could have sent fleets to expel the Dutch from the region, but Qianlong said that people who left the Qing were traitors and he didn't care.

            This has always been Chinese policy for Chinese subjects who live outside of China. If you lived far away from the Emperor's grasp and from Chinese civilization you're as good as barbarian.

            Its why the Ming called pirates "Wokou" (Japanese Pirates) even if many of them were ethnically Chinese.

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              Don't lie nagger. Southern Ming Prince of Yanping Koxinga (Zheng Chenggong) and his son Zheng Jing planned to invade the Spanish Philippines because of war between Han diaspora and the Spanish and to help the Muslims there against Spain. He also planned to invade Dutch held Malacca in the Malayan peninsula.

              They are the reason why Spain abandoned the Moluccas.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >even military losses for China could hardly mean anything
          Hello, fellow grand strategist!

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      He was competent in administration and was, by all accounts, witty in conversation and brave on the battlefield. Nevertheless, his vision was narrowed by an obsession with proving himself as being on par with, if not superior to, his predecessors, particularly the Kangxi emperor. He devoted so much time and resources in planning campaigns of expansion and building projects that he neglected a lot of the issues that would prove to be nigh insurmountable for his successors (overpopulation, hard limits on agricultural yields, aging infrastructure, unremitting tax burdens, etc.)

      Qianlong is like a prodigy who spent all his energy on casting a greater shadow than his forebears and building monuments to his ego. It is easy to find him charming but far harder to see him as a good ruler, especially in the overall context of the Qing dynasty.

      The 10 Great Campaigns is what led to this. Kangxi expanded China's borders while Qianlong spread its influence beyond its borders. Since even military losses for China could hardly mean anything due to being huge while being a pyrrhic victory for the smaller states, the campaigns were often to just force them into accepting tributary status to ensure a repeat attack doesn't happen.

      Qianlong ordered mass genocides, he ordered the destruction of texts and editing his own incorrect bullshit "corrections" into historical texts (histories of Liao, Jin, Yuan) based on completely wrong linguistic analysis.

      He was competent in administration and was, by all accounts, witty in conversation and brave on the battlefield. Nevertheless, his vision was narrowed by an obsession with proving himself as being on par with, if not superior to, his predecessors, particularly the Kangxi emperor. He devoted so much time and resources in planning campaigns of expansion and building projects that he neglected a lot of the issues that would prove to be nigh insurmountable for his successors (overpopulation, hard limits on agricultural yields, aging infrastructure, unremitting tax burdens, etc.)

      Qianlong is like a prodigy who spent all his energy on casting a greater shadow than his forebears and building monuments to his ego. It is easy to find him charming but far harder to see him as a good ruler, especially in the overall context of the Qing dynasty.

      >brave on the battlefield.

      Qianlong didn't direct a single battle in the field and instead threw tantrums and screeched at field commanders who actually led battles.

      >witty in conversation

      You're mistaking him for his father the Yongzheng Emperor.

      The Yongzheng Emperor abolished waist chopping execution as inhumane and raised salaries for eunuchs and even pardoned someone who tried to incite a rebellion against the Qing, explaining to him that he regarded everyone as brethren and China as his own state.

      Kangxi actually went into the battlefield himself to direct battles.

      Qianlong reversed the pardon and sentenced the person to death, he ordered burning of texts in literary inquisition, he screamed at generals in the battlefield (both a Manchu general and Han banner general were forced to suicide or executed over the Jinchuan campaign) and he did the same in the Burma campaign,he ordered mass genocide of Oirats.

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I heard Qing got some family scandals. Their haplogroups don’t match up with their predecessors.

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    He was competent in administration and was, by all accounts, witty in conversation and brave on the battlefield. Nevertheless, his vision was narrowed by an obsession with proving himself as being on par with, if not superior to, his predecessors, particularly the Kangxi emperor. He devoted so much time and resources in planning campaigns of expansion and building projects that he neglected a lot of the issues that would prove to be nigh insurmountable for his successors (overpopulation, hard limits on agricultural yields, aging infrastructure, unremitting tax burdens, etc.)

    Qianlong is like a prodigy who spent all his energy on casting a greater shadow than his forebears and building monuments to his ego. It is easy to find him charming but far harder to see him as a good ruler, especially in the overall context of the Qing dynasty.

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    He looks Nordic. We wuz.

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Who?

  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I want to learn Mandarin. Can any CCP spies in western Europe contact me? I work for a NATO military and would exchange knowledge for free Mandarin lessons, especially if the teacher you give me is a hot Chinese lady.

  10. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    The only reason he didn't go down as a disaster is because Britain was rather busy elsewhere in 1790-1810. He'd already offended the Brits beyond measure, if there was no Napoleon they'd have fucked China up earlier and he'd have gone down as yet another backwards idiot

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Han soldiers played a role in the British slaughter the Manchus in Zhenjiang and Zhapu in the first opium war and were part of the reason the Manchu bannermen were routed and slaughtered. They helped light the Manchu section of the cities on fire after the bannermen accused them of helping the British. All Manchus in Zhenjiang and 99% of Manchus in Zhapu were killed or committed suicide by self immolation and throat slitting.

      Han coolies assisted Anglo French forces in butchering Manchus at Dagu forts in 1860 which led to the battle of Palikou.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        ok, who are you talking to?

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *