Wait?

Wait, LULZ.. we need to chat about the early Christians.

Were they innocent or guilty of destroying classical knowledge via texts? I am hearing mixed views on this, some say they didn't destroy these texts and rather used them to presuppose their belief system. Others say that they destroyed a good number of these texts and that's why we don't know about them.

Who is right about this?

  1. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    There's nothing wrong with destroying classical knowledge, but I would certainly say they hold the charge.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Ok, does anyone else want to dispute first poster?

  2. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Guilty as fuck. They also destroyed the Library of Alexandria. Christianity is a cancer on the world.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      According to Wikipedia, Theodosius and a Pope Theophilus destroyed the remnants of this library, which was already deprived of books apparently, because pagans themselves were hiding there. This on the contrary, does not make them guilty for destroying the library at its fullest extent, as this was already destroyed by Julius Caesar years past.

      So it appears nothing was really lost that 2nd time when the Christians burned it.

      Now there might be other times when they did repeatedly burn past, saved knowledge but I don't know about this.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        >According to Wikipedia, Theodosius and a Pope Theophilus destroyed the remnants of this library, which was already deprived of books apparently, because pagans themselves were hiding there. This on the contrary, does not make them guilty for destroying the library at its fullest extent, as this was already destroyed by Julius Caesar years past.
        It's unclear when the Library of Alexandria really went south. Caesar did burn a part of the library, but there is some evidence that the damage was superficial. There were also other fires during the long history of the library, and the library itself became less relevant over time as Hellenism and the Ptolemies declined.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      So in terms of the Library of Alexandria it appears they were innocent in terms of classical texts being burnt.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      #
      Christians definitely did not destroy the library or Alexandria as it has already stopped existing by the 4th century (likely due to the fucking tsunami that Alexandria had in 365).

      The roman pagan historian, Ammianus Marcellinus, writing in the 370s speaks of the library in the Serapeum in the past tense, so it no longer existed by the time Christians supposedly destroyed it in the 391 (and no other account describes the destruction of a library in the Serapeum cause none existed). There are five witness accounts (pagan and Christina) of the destruction of the Serapeum. None of which mention the destruction of any kind of library.

  3. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Here’s all you need to know

    https://historyforatheists.com/2020/03/the-great-myths-8-the-loss-of-ancient-learning/

  4. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Guilty by both willful and unwilling neglect. I imagine actively burning pagan literature wasn't as common (why would you when you could just make a palimpsest or reuse it in other ways) but not copying texts in those times pretty much spelled doom for those texts.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Maybe not "unwilling", but "not conscious" neglect.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      That’s ridiculous. Not everything can be persevered. Even a lot of ancient stuff that’s been preserved by Christians is barely read today.

      Copying in the Middle Ages was time consuming and extremely expensive. People by the end of the Middle Ages had the printing press yet still a lot of written texts still disappeared. Is it because people in the 16th and 17th century hated Arthur and wanted to secretly destroy it?

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        >not everything can be preserved
        >that's why 90% of what is preserved of latin literature had to be deciphered from palimpsests written over with the gospels or whatever else, no, we couldn't use any other papyrus or parchment

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          As usual, you’re full of shit.

          > Flynn also makes the correct statement that there was nothing unusual about recycling parchment to make a new book, and notes that this happened to both Christian and “pagan” texts alike – in fact it was far more common for this to happen to Christian texts, as there were more of them to recycle. Of the many palimpsests being examined by the ongoing Sinai Palimpsests Project, focused on the collection of St Catherine’s Monastery, one of the oldest libraries in the world, most of the texts that have been written over are Christian rather than pagan. There is no pattern to which manuscripts got recycled: they were clearly chosen because they were from books which had been damaged and some of the quires could be salvaged for recycling, books which were obsolete, books of which the owner or institution had multiple copies already or books for which they had no use. Making parchment was onerous, laborious and required specialist skills and therefore the material was expensive to buy new. Recycling it was simply more time and cost effective.

          Either way, I still don’t understand. Why why would Christians be obligated to persevere pagan texts over Christian texts anyway? Vikings literally had a greater obligation than Christians to persevere them.

  5. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    A better question is why do people who hate Christians think Christians were obligated to persevere anything? People should be grateful they even preserved anything because they had absolutely no obligation to do so in the first place.

  6. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    A better question is why didn’t they destroy it all? Could have had a kino medieval culture forever instead of the classical humanist/enlightenment trash we ended up with after the renaissance

  7. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    "Nigel Chudsbad wouldn't ask this"

  8. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Christians destroyed the Sibylline Books, which the Romans used to guide them through crises. Only a small fragment survives

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      That was Stilicho and he didn’t do it for religious reasons

      Pagan emperors even before him were known to burn parts of it because they didn’t like what it said

Your email address will not be published.