LULZ / Autos

used electric cars

It's almost impossible to find an older Tesla under 30k. Meanwhile a luxury ICE from the same era (circa 2012) costs half that or less. When will these shits get cheaper?

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    When there are more of them and/or less demand. I have no doubt a bunch of people are hunting for volts/i3s/leafs either in the current year.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      So then the answer is "not any time soon" seeing as there's direct correlation between gas prices and EV demand.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        by which time I bet electricity will be much more expensive

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          This breaks the EVfags mind

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I can't tell if I'm retarded or if it's the hormonal climate activists, but the whole thing looks to me like yet another way to scam people.

            >steal your data
            >gouge you for money
            >track you wherever you go
            >get you on a subscription where you have to swap it out for a new one every 4-5 years because the battery goes bad and it stops receiving updates like an old phone
            >make it near impossible to repair independently

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >lock you out of the charging network if you transgress against the government or shady megacorp in any way

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Probably when they finally update their horribly outdated, decade+ old design. The fact that you can buy a 10 year old one, swap the headlights and grille-less bumper over, and flex like you're in a brand new Tessie definitely helps keep prices up. Your average normie isn't even going to know about things like the yearly mileage loss due to battery wear, nor will they care.

              You've got it. We're talking about a car where interior cameras are facing the driver that can't be shut off, 360 degree cameras are transmitting to "Tesla engineers" at all times, and that can be geofenced to be locked out of driving to certain areas at will.

              Nobody wants to replace a ~$15k EV battery, and your average normie wants the newest smartphone updates, UI and feature updates for their EVs just as well. Without a doubt subscription services will be rolled out as an alternative to this - you "save" on maintenance and wear while in turn owning nothing in the end, as is the goal.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >The fact that you can buy a 10 year old one, swap the headlights and grille-less bumper over, and flex like you're in a brand new Tessie
                I bet every single one of the Teslafags at the charging station would spot this immediately and laugh

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Early builds of the Model S we're built with solely HSPA (AT&T 3G) modems so their telephony is literally obsolete and they are unable to connect to anything without a $1500 modem upgrade.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Key West to Orlando is a ~7 hour drive normally. Or around 400 miles. Model S has 400 miles range fully charged. The tornado early warning happens days in advance. They must have waited the last day of tornado warning and with the car that hasn't been topped off for whatever reason.

                Or its a fake story.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                That range is only theoretically achievable, even under normal circumstances it's usually around 60-70% of that. Add to that that the car is fully loaded in this case. Plus, if the car was already 2-3 years old the battery is already considerably weakened
                Also, note how all EVs got stuck at the same spot

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Wrong. On normal situation the car gets the rated miles. Its only if you're driving 80+ mph constantly, in scorching summer heat where you're running full AC or in winter where the battery is cold. 2 year battery is meaningless because range loss is barely noticible for Tesla cars. They are stated for ~300K miles with >80% charge capacity left.

                Even if the car was being driven erratically and say they only get 300 miles out of 400 miles, you could still plan ahead and charge accordingly.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Well, apparently not. Why would you even "argue" this when that's obviously not how it went down?
                >On normal situation the car gets the rated miles.
                This is not true, and you know it. It's been like this since day one, for any make and model. 60-70% of the claimed range is pretty much standard across the industry. And again, the car was fully loaded.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Wrong lmao. You lose 30-40% in extreme scenarios only where either extreme extreme heat or extreme cold forces you to use battery powered AC/Heating system to compensate for the heat differences.

                Most teslas are within the stated EPA range +-5%.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >That range is only theoretically achievable
                My car was rated at 238 Wh/mi. I've observed as low as 175 Wh/mi, but 200 Wh/mi is pretty typical in nice weather. That's going to exceed the rated range by quite a bit.

                The range is based on an annual average which includes only getting around 3 miles to a kWh in winter. The rest of the year its not hard to meet or exceed the rated range at 65-70 mph.
                If you live somewhere that doesn't get -40 winter weather like Florida you should be getting better than the rated range pretty much all the time as long as you can keep your lead foot in check.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The screencap is one case where I think EVs have an upside. The same scenario can occur at a gas station. Meanwhile an EV owner can be unaffected by fluctuations like this if they have solar panels or a generator. Of course in the long run they are still completely dependent on a supply chain to maintain their cars.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                A line at a gas station won't take 7+ hours, since each car can be filled up in about 5 minutes. Each of these EVs had to be charged for several hours, just a handful of cars would be enough to leave you stranded for ages if you think about it

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Each of these EVs had to be charged for several hours
                Wrong. Tesla tops of 0-80% in 25 mins. What you're thinking about is Nissan Leaf or other EVs that are forced to use level 1 home chargers that takes hours to charge.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Each of these EVs had to be charged for several hours,
                Pure fantasy. The typical time spent at an EV fast charger is already less than 10 minues.
                Anything more than 15 minutes is generally self defeating as the battery hits the point where charging slows down and the car has enough range to continue.
                Even a single hour at a fast charger is exceptionally unusual, most cars hit 95% in about 45 minutes.

                When chargers get extremely congested like that, limits get placed on charging to keep people from clogging it up.
                I've never run into this in years of owning an EV, I've still never even encountered full charger, let alone a badly congested one.

                Tesla does have these mobile Superchargers they can deploy for these kind of emergency situations when they know lots of cars will be going through only a few stations.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >A line at a gas station won't take 7+ hours, since each car can be filled up in about 5 minutes.

                I'm talking about an empty gas stations scenario, which is what you would have with those kinds of queues.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >empty gas stations
                Doesn't exist and nothing keeps you from having a small tank or few canisters of fuel at home.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Just before the war there were a few places in europe where running costs for EVs and regular cars already overlapped. Despite all the tax breaks

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Grid electricity would have to go up to $.40 a kWh, $13.50 a gallon equivalent to get to $.10 a mile, where gas used to cost if you had a 34mpg car. Right now I pay about $.08 a kWh when I buy it from the grid. My solar panels meanwhile generate functionally $0 electricity, but they did cost quite a bit to buy so over their lifespan that's about $.01 a kWh.
          That's the real game changer here. You can't really make your own gas, and you have to buy it from the Saudis and Russians for whatever they want to make you pay, Americans can generate our own clean energy and tell them to fuck off.

          Also remember that about 6kWh of electricity goes into the extraction, refining, and delivery of every gallon of gas. So if you are fantasizing about electricity becoming more expensive, that will make gas more expensive too.
          Driving a 4 mile per kWh BEV is simply never going to cost more than driving a less than 1 mile per kWh gas car. There are BEVs coming in the near future that will go 7+ miles on a kWh of electricity.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Model S 60 did hold its price in the before times (2019) as well though. It held to it's value pretty much as well as a Wrangler. I think it's just a matter of cars with strong brands depreciating very slowly, with the exception of European cars because they wear out as quickly as disposable gloves.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    when they stop being 2nd cars for rich people aka never. the people who own an EV don't need it other than to signal virtue.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    Why would you buy that hot garbage?

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I have a 2019 Model 3 which I bought for $65K. I am thinking of buying it again, with the same options, which right now would costs $67K.

    I will put the order this month, and put the deposit to lock in the price.

    The waiting time right now is of ~1 year. When the time comes, I will sell the one I have now. The value of money will go down, which means I will likely be able to sell it for over ~$75K. In the end, I will even make a profit.

    And if worse came to happen, and I cant sell it, I can always cancel the order, and get the deposit back.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >being this retarded

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Batteries are expensive to replace, render the vehicle unusable after they degrade/fail
    >The fire hazard of batteries
    >Electricity is less reliable or outright unavailable in emergency situations, it's not as easy to store as fuels.
    >Time spent charging. Quick charging degrades the battery even faster
    >Battery manufacturing still contaminates
    >Electric motors are soulless in a vehicle
    >The unbearable fucking attitude of people that think they're 'saving the planet' for driving an EV.

    ICE might be a bit more complicated and maintenance intensive, but they're more trust-worthy. Generally, I oppose any regulations regarding this matter. People should be able to drive whatever the fuck they want, so long as it is in good mechanical shape.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Same old tired fud.
      You shills have to update your script

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        SEETHE more you retarded shill.
        You do not belong here, never have, never will.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >bawww not on muh LULZ
          Kek look around. Ev enthusiasts are everywhere here.
          And you can't stop us.
          How does it feel being completely powerless?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Here's your """enthusiast""" vehicle you retarded shill homosexual.
            You will never belong here.
            You will never have power here.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Wait until the tax on electric cars comes.
    Gas tax pay for roads. Ecucks will get fucked

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Ecucks will get fucked
      And they will enjoy every second of it.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      unironically, it will the adoption of electric cars.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        kill

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      EVs already pay the equivalent of about 50k miles a year in gas tax to pay for the roads. Much more than gas cars pay.
      They're still much cheaper to drive. My Tesla daily with the road use fee and electricity costs about $.03 cents a mile.

      For contrast gas for my weekend car today was $5.10 a gallon, about $.18 a mile.

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