this is the best book i have ever read

this is the best book i have ever read

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    i am still trying to wrap my head around it. it is insane and beautiful and grotesque and i love everything about it. i love how it fucked with my head and then brought me to a realization moments later, i love how it meshes the past and the future into one present hellscape. i love everything about this book. i don’t think i will read anything that will ever top this book. i am going to read a few different books and then read it again. i am going to buy a hardcover to place carefully on my bookshelf to gawk at every so often. i love this book

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I couldn't read it because the idioms filtered me.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      a simple google search solves this problem. plus the references sort themself out later in the book imo. i recommend you pick it back up

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Reddit title

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    this is the passage that made me love this book. it was a good book before this, already easily a 4/5, but this passage topped it off for me. i know it is confusing without context but the switch in pov from the collective convent of old women to the singular mudito is what made me realize this is the best book i have ever read. no author has made me feel the way jose donoso made me feel in this passage. in most writing, it feels like whiplash when the pov switches, but the smooth way it is done here made me read this passage over and over again the other day. and how it relates to the plot, it is amazing, ive never seen it done like this and this well before

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Woman or tranny?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        woman sorry

        Probably because you need to read more than 30 books

        i only read for fun so a lot of simple things make me love books, what is your issue with this book?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      where the fuck are the periods?

      Woman or tranny?

      >Woman or tranny?
      my thoughts as well

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Probably because you need to read more than 30 books

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I can't find a reasonably priced English copy anywhere.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      go on thriftbooks, i got my copy for $5 but theres one on thriftbooks for $10 right now i think

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I thought it was about 30% too long and like all postmodernism is incapable of developing a satisfying ending. I found certain passages to be much better written and more interesting than others, with everything surrounding Humberto's pre-Casa past and Jeronimo to be the best the book had to offer.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      this is true, although to me the repetitive rituals of the old women was the most enjoyable part to me. i have always enjoyed repetition in writing. i guess it is just different tastes

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        did you have any interesting conclusions you took away from the book: thematic analysis, things you read between the lines, etc? With books like these that seem to lack a singular uniting force or throughline I always find little connections or ideas that are almost certainly haphazard and unintentional but are the consequence of so many plot details.

        I personally thought there was a Hegelian master-slave dialectic in the book, most directly in Humberto's power over Jeronimo being connected to observation: Humberto made Jeronimo "real" by observing him. To a larger extent Humberto, the old women, and other characters find power in ostensible helplessness and Humberto is happiest when negated.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          i’m not a very smart person, but the whole idea of possession, of sharing a body with another person, and the idea of madness in old age. when the mind ages memories contort and stories passed through generations warp. and what you said about becoming someone by seeing them, the same as the possession aspect. i mean literally at one point, humberto believed the monsters were swapping their blood with his in an attempt to possess him, and then with his insanity it goes on to be multiple other things. but the main overarching theme i saw in the book was life and death. ines giving away her youth to become old, humberto giving away his age to become a baby for iris. i’m not sure what to makw of the life and death aspect but it’s a major theme repeated multiple times. and the changes of humberto’s identity, along with jeronimo also changing his identity (in la rinconada at the end of the book). a lot of times i also noticed, i guess this plays into the possession part, the fate of one person would then happen to the next person, not sure on this one but a lot of events felt similar to earlier ones. again i’m not smart, i don’t study literature, i only read books for fun, so all of this is surface level but these are just the things i saw

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            i also just read books for fun, but that seems like more than just surface level analysis to me lol. i think combined with the life-and-death theme is the idea of changing social station. there's a bit of a class commentary introduced with humberto describing the values his father instilled in him and his obsession with Jeronimo. Humberto envies Jeronimo's class and the sexual power it grants him, attempting to hijack it by pretending to be Jeronimo in order to sleep with Ines. Jeronimo becoming a monster at the end of the book turns all the real monsters into his social betters. Ines rejects her social station by taking a vow of poverty and pretends to be an old lady, while simultaneously (or in contradiction), Peta Ponce performs the same usurpation Humberto did to become Ines and steal her class position. It seems like Humberto fails in his ultimate mission to usurp Jeronimo and the alternative is to abnegate himself rather than embrace life at the station of his birth.

            I appreciate how books like this can have so many themes and can be interpreted in so many different ways.

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I liked his paragraph style, I even wrote like that for a while, but the market doesn't welcome these things. maybe try in the recent future.

    Have you read Saramago? the theme diverges a little, but the writing style is very reminiscent of Saramago and some Byns 4yrazilian authors.

  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why? Can you give reasons?

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