The Central Park jogger case (events also referenced as the Central Park Five Case) was a criminal case in the United States over the aggravated assau...


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The Central Park jogger case (events also referenced as the Central Park Five Case) was a criminal case in the United States over the aggravated assault and rape of a white woman in Manhattan's Central Park on April 19, 1989, occurring at the same time as an unrelated string of other attacks in the park the same night. Five black and Latino youths were convicted of assaulting the woman, and served sentences ranging from six to twelve years. All later had their charges vacated after a prison inmate confessed to the crime.

  1. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    They wuz just joggin

  2. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    but whowaz jogger

  3. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Just skimmed what I could about the case. It seems as though police were in a bit of a rush to find those responsible and, in their haste, browbeat some teens into confessing despite a lack of any real evidence - only for the real perpetrator to go unnoticed for many years.

    Sloppy work, officers.

  4. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Five black and Latino youths were convicted of assaulting the woman
    and nothing of value was lost

  5. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Not noted in the op: the youths were guilty of assaulting women, just not the one beaten into a coma.

    Also it has never been determined whether or not the “victim” said the n-word.

  6. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Not today Tulsatranny
    >The five accused rapists — Kevin Richardson, Antron McCray, Raymond Santana, Yusef Salaam and Kharey Wise — were duly convicted of the 1989 Central Park rape, as well as other assaults in the park that night; “exonerated” 13 years later; and, more than a decade after that, paid $40 million by the city of New York to “settle” a malicious prosecution case within months of Bill de Blasio becoming mayor, despite city lawyers’ confidence that they would win at trial.
    >Here is just some of the evidence against them.
    >Santana was one of the first boys picked up in the park the night of the attacks, April 19, 1989. While being driven to the precinct house, he blurted out: “I had nothing to do with the rape. All I did was feel the woman’s tits.”
    >At this point, the jogger hadn’t been found. The police knew nothing about any rape.
    >Richardson rode to the precinct with another boy, who announced to the police that he knew who did “the murder,” naming Antron McCray.
    >Richardson concurred, saying, “Yeah. That’s who did it.”
    >Again, the police didn’t know about the jogger yet. (It’s not surprising that the boys thought she was dead: Her doctors didn’t expect her to live through the night.)
    >Over the next few days, five teenaged boys gave detailed confessions about the attack on the woman, as well as the other attacks. All five made their confessions in the presence of their parents or guardians.
    >It is absolute madness to imagine that officers did anything to coerce these confessions. When the boys confessed, no one — not them, not the prosecutors, not the police interviewing them — had any idea whether the jogger would emerge from her coma, remembering everything. (Mercifully, she remembered nothing.)
    >Why on earth would cops bully five random teenagers into false confessions, knowing that the victim might wake up at any moment and announce, My boyfriend did it! That would be rather awkward for any cop who’d gotten someone else to confess.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >In a six-week pre-trial hearing, the boys’ confessions were subjected to relentless assault by defense attorneys. The confessions were attacked again during both trials and on appeal. The trial judge, the two multi-ethnic juries and the appellate court judges found the confessions voluntary — and damning.
      >Salaam confessed to the rape after the detective questioning him said that fingerprints had been found on the jogger’s clothing, and if the prints were his, he was “going down for the rape.” Salaam confessed immediately. Why would he do that — unless he was worried the prints might be his?
      >Taken to the scene of the crime by a detective and a prosecutor the following morning, Wise said, “Damn, damn, that’s a lot of blood. … I knew she was bleeding, but I didn’t know how bad she was. It was really dark. I couldn’t see how much blood there was at night.” (She’d lost three-quarters of her blood.)
      >The police also had incriminating testimony from friends and acquaintances of the defendants.
      >Dennis Commedo, one of the boys who was part of the larger group, told the police that, when he ran into Richardson in the park that night, he’d said, “We just raped somebody.”
      >Wise told a friend’s sister, Melody Jackson, that he didn’t rape the jogger; he “only held her legs down while Kevin (Richardson) f—ed her.” Jackson volunteered this information to the police, thinking it would help Wise.
      >Two of Wise’s friends said that, the next day, he told them, “You heard about that woman that was beat up and raped in the park last night. That was us!”
      >Another boy arrested for the attacks, but not the rape, told the detectives on videotape that he overheard Santana and a friend laughing in the park about how they’d “made a woman bleed.”
      >The defendants also knew facts about the attack that only someone who had been there could possibly know. Two of the boys, Santana and Richardson, independently pointed out the exact location where the rape had occurred.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        So they didn't do the rape then.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >The defendants also knew facts about the attack that only someone who had been there could possibly know. Two of the boys, Santana and Richardson, independently pointed out the exact location where the rape had occurred.
        >Wise told the detective interviewing him that someone he thought was named “Rudy” had stolen the jogger’s Walkman. The officer’s notes state: “persons present when girl raped. … Rudy — played with tits/took walkman.”
        >At that point, the jogger was still in a coma. Police investigators had no way of knowing that she’d been carrying a Walkman. Thirteen years later, the sixth rapist, Matias Reyes — the only rapist, according to Hollywood and former District Attorney Robert Morgenthau — told police that in addition to raping the jogger, he’d stolen her Walkman.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Not today Tulsatranny
      aka Lynchfag aka LBJfag aka one very sore black NEET

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Aka at least 3 different people
        t. was accused of being TulsaTranny for posting in a thread about lynching

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >In a six-week pre-trial hearing, the boys’ confessions were subjected to relentless assault by defense attorneys. The confessions were attacked again during both trials and on appeal. The trial judge, the two multi-ethnic juries and the appellate court judges found the confessions voluntary — and damning.
      >Salaam confessed to the rape after the detective questioning him said that fingerprints had been found on the jogger’s clothing, and if the prints were his, he was “going down for the rape.” Salaam confessed immediately. Why would he do that — unless he was worried the prints might be his?
      >Taken to the scene of the crime by a detective and a prosecutor the following morning, Wise said, “Damn, damn, that’s a lot of blood. … I knew she was bleeding, but I didn’t know how bad she was. It was really dark. I couldn’t see how much blood there was at night.” (She’d lost three-quarters of her blood.)
      >The police also had incriminating testimony from friends and acquaintances of the defendants.
      >Dennis Commedo, one of the boys who was part of the larger group, told the police that, when he ran into Richardson in the park that night, he’d said, “We just raped somebody.”
      >Wise told a friend’s sister, Melody Jackson, that he didn’t rape the jogger; he “only held her legs down while Kevin (Richardson) f—ed her.” Jackson volunteered this information to the police, thinking it would help Wise.
      >Two of Wise’s friends said that, the next day, he told them, “You heard about that woman that was beat up and raped in the park last night. That was us!”
      >Another boy arrested for the attacks, but not the rape, told the detectives on videotape that he overheard Santana and a friend laughing in the park about how they’d “made a woman bleed.”
      >The defendants also knew facts about the attack that only someone who had been there could possibly know. Two of the boys, Santana and Richardson, independently pointed out the exact location where the rape had occurred.

      >The defendants also knew facts about the attack that only someone who had been there could possibly know. Two of the boys, Santana and Richardson, independently pointed out the exact location where the rape had occurred.
      >Wise told the detective interviewing him that someone he thought was named “Rudy” had stolen the jogger’s Walkman. The officer’s notes state: “persons present when girl raped. … Rudy — played with tits/took walkman.”
      >At that point, the jogger was still in a coma. Police investigators had no way of knowing that she’d been carrying a Walkman. Thirteen years later, the sixth rapist, Matias Reyes — the only rapist, according to Hollywood and former District Attorney Robert Morgenthau — told police that in addition to raping the jogger, he’d stolen her Walkman.

      >On April 19, 1989, investment banker Trisha Meili went for a run through Central Park around 9 p.m., whereupon she was attacked by a wolf pack looking for a “white girl,” dragged 100 yards into the woods, stripped, beaten with a pipe and a brick, raped and left for dead.
      >By the time the police found Meili, she’d lost three-quarters of her blood. Her case was initially assigned to the homicide unit of the D.A.‘s office because none of her doctors thought she would make it through the night.
      >Of the 37 youths brought in for questioning about the multiple violent attacks in the park that night, only 10 were charged with a crime and only five for the rape of the jogger: Antron McCray, Yusef Salaam, Raymond Santana, Kevin Richardson and Korey Wise. All five confessed—four on videotape with adult relatives present and one with a parent present, but not on videotape.
      >Two unanimous, multicultural juries convicted them, despite aggressive defense lawyers putting on their best case.
      >After waiting an interminable 13 years, the media proclaimed that the five convicts had been “exonerated” by DNA evidence!
      >DNA evidence didn’t convict them, so it couldn’t exonerate them. This was a gang attack. It was always known that another rapist “got away,” as the prosecutor told the jury, and that none of the defendants’ DNA was found in the jogger’s cervix or on her sock—the only samples that were taken.
      >While it blows most people away to find out that none of the suspects’ DNA was found on Meili, the whole trick is that they’re looking at it through a modern lens. Today, these kids’ DNA would have been found all over the crime scene. But in 1989, DNA was a primitive science. The cops wouldn’t have even looked for such evidence back then.
      >The case was solved with other evidence—and there was a lot of it.

      >On the drive to the precinct, Raymond Santana blurted out, “I had nothing to do with the rape. All I did was feel the woman’s t—s.” The cops didn’t even know about a rape yet.
      >Yusef Salaam announced to the detective interviewing him, “I was there, but I didn’t rape her.” Even if true, under the law, anyone who participated in the attack on Meili is guilty of her rape.
      >Two of Korey Wise’s friends said that when they ran into him on the street the day after the attack, he told them the cops were after him. “You heard about that woman that was beat up and raped in the park last night? That was us!”
      >Taken to the scene of the crime by a detective and a prosecutor, he said, “Damn, damn, that’s a lot of blood. … I knew she was bleeding, but I didn’t know how bad she was. It was dark. I couldn’t see how much blood there was at night.”
      >Wise also told a detective that someone he thought was named “Rudy” stole the jogger’s Walkman and belt pouch. The jogger was still in a coma. The police did not know yet that a Walkman had been stolen from her.
      >Wise told a friend’s sister, Melody Jackson, that he didn’t rape the jogger; he “only held her legs down while Kevin (Richardson) f—-ed her.” Jackson volunteered this information to the police, thinking it would help Wise.
      >The night of the attack, Richardson told an acquaintance, “We just raped somebody.” The crotch of his underwear was suspiciously stained with semen, grass stains, dirt and debris. Walking near the crime scene with a detective the next day, Richardson said, “This is where we got her … where the raping occurred.”
      >Santana and Richardson independently brought investigators to the precise location of the attack on the jogger.
      >Recall that, when all these statements were made, no one—not the police, the witnesses, the suspects, or their friends and acquaintances—knew whether Meili would emerge from her coma and be able to identify her attackers.

      >Burns has studied the trial transcripts so closely that she called the prosecutor by the wrong name in her op-ed. Far from trembling and afraid, as Burns imagines, the suspects were singing the rap song “Wild Thing” for hours in the precinct house, laughing and joking about raping the jogger. One of the attackers said, “It was fun.”
      >When a cop told Santana that he should have been out with a girlfriend rather than mugging people in Central Park, Santana responded, “I already got mines,” and laughed with another boy from the park. One of the youths arrested that night stated on videotape that he heard Santana and another boy laughing about “how they ‘made a woman bleed.’”
      >This allegation was based on Matias Reyes’ confession to the attack. His DNA matched the unidentified DNA on the jogger—proving nothing, other than that he was the one who “got away.” He is also the “Rudy” who stole her Walkman, as Wise said at the time. Reyes admitted he took it. How did Wise know that?
      >A cellmate of Reyes claims he said that he heard a woman screaming in the park that night and ran to join in the rape.
      >The “exoneration” comes down to Reyes’ unsubstantiated claim that he acted alone. Years of careful investigation, videotaped confessions, witness statements, assembling evidence, trial by jury and repeated appeals—all that is nothing compared to the word of an upstanding citizen like Reyes, a violent psychopath who sexually assaulted his own mother and raped and murdered a pregnant woman while her children heard the attack through the bedroom door.
      >That’s the sum total of the “exoneration”: the word of a psycho.
      >Noticeably, Reyes faced absolutely no penalty for his confession—the statute of limitations had run out years earlier. Before he confessed, Reyes had been moved to Korey Wise’s cellblock. He requested a transfer on the grounds that he feared retaliation from Wise’s gang. All he had to do was confess—with no penalty—and announce that he acted alone.

      Literally an op-ed by a far right political author, not a legal paper.

  7. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >On April 19, 1989, investment banker Trisha Meili went for a run through Central Park around 9 p.m., whereupon she was attacked by a wolf pack looking for a “white girl,” dragged 100 yards into the woods, stripped, beaten with a pipe and a brick, raped and left for dead.
    >By the time the police found Meili, she’d lost three-quarters of her blood. Her case was initially assigned to the homicide unit of the D.A.‘s office because none of her doctors thought she would make it through the night.
    >Of the 37 youths brought in for questioning about the multiple violent attacks in the park that night, only 10 were charged with a crime and only five for the rape of the jogger: Antron McCray, Yusef Salaam, Raymond Santana, Kevin Richardson and Korey Wise. All five confessed—four on videotape with adult relatives present and one with a parent present, but not on videotape.
    >Two unanimous, multicultural juries convicted them, despite aggressive defense lawyers putting on their best case.
    >After waiting an interminable 13 years, the media proclaimed that the five convicts had been “exonerated” by DNA evidence!
    >DNA evidence didn’t convict them, so it couldn’t exonerate them. This was a gang attack. It was always known that another rapist “got away,” as the prosecutor told the jury, and that none of the defendants’ DNA was found in the jogger’s cervix or on her sock—the only samples that were taken.
    >While it blows most people away to find out that none of the suspects’ DNA was found on Meili, the whole trick is that they’re looking at it through a modern lens. Today, these kids’ DNA would have been found all over the crime scene. But in 1989, DNA was a primitive science. The cops wouldn’t have even looked for such evidence back then.
    >The case was solved with other evidence—and there was a lot of it.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >On the drive to the precinct, Raymond Santana blurted out, “I had nothing to do with the rape. All I did was feel the woman’s t—s.” The cops didn’t even know about a rape yet.
      >Yusef Salaam announced to the detective interviewing him, “I was there, but I didn’t rape her.” Even if true, under the law, anyone who participated in the attack on Meili is guilty of her rape.
      >Two of Korey Wise’s friends said that when they ran into him on the street the day after the attack, he told them the cops were after him. “You heard about that woman that was beat up and raped in the park last night? That was us!”
      >Taken to the scene of the crime by a detective and a prosecutor, he said, “Damn, damn, that’s a lot of blood. … I knew she was bleeding, but I didn’t know how bad she was. It was dark. I couldn’t see how much blood there was at night.”
      >Wise also told a detective that someone he thought was named “Rudy” stole the jogger’s Walkman and belt pouch. The jogger was still in a coma. The police did not know yet that a Walkman had been stolen from her.
      >Wise told a friend’s sister, Melody Jackson, that he didn’t rape the jogger; he “only held her legs down while Kevin (Richardson) f—-ed her.” Jackson volunteered this information to the police, thinking it would help Wise.
      >The night of the attack, Richardson told an acquaintance, “We just raped somebody.” The crotch of his underwear was suspiciously stained with semen, grass stains, dirt and debris. Walking near the crime scene with a detective the next day, Richardson said, “This is where we got her … where the raping occurred.”
      >Santana and Richardson independently brought investigators to the precise location of the attack on the jogger.
      >Recall that, when all these statements were made, no one—not the police, the witnesses, the suspects, or their friends and acquaintances—knew whether Meili would emerge from her coma and be able to identify her attackers.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Burns has studied the trial transcripts so closely that she called the prosecutor by the wrong name in her op-ed. Far from trembling and afraid, as Burns imagines, the suspects were singing the rap song “Wild Thing” for hours in the precinct house, laughing and joking about raping the jogger. One of the attackers said, “It was fun.”
        >When a cop told Santana that he should have been out with a girlfriend rather than mugging people in Central Park, Santana responded, “I already got mines,” and laughed with another boy from the park. One of the youths arrested that night stated on videotape that he heard Santana and another boy laughing about “how they ‘made a woman bleed.’”
        >This allegation was based on Matias Reyes’ confession to the attack. His DNA matched the unidentified DNA on the jogger—proving nothing, other than that he was the one who “got away.” He is also the “Rudy” who stole her Walkman, as Wise said at the time. Reyes admitted he took it. How did Wise know that?
        >A cellmate of Reyes claims he said that he heard a woman screaming in the park that night and ran to join in the rape.
        >The “exoneration” comes down to Reyes’ unsubstantiated claim that he acted alone. Years of careful investigation, videotaped confessions, witness statements, assembling evidence, trial by jury and repeated appeals—all that is nothing compared to the word of an upstanding citizen like Reyes, a violent psychopath who sexually assaulted his own mother and raped and murdered a pregnant woman while her children heard the attack through the bedroom door.
        >That’s the sum total of the “exoneration”: the word of a psycho.
        >Noticeably, Reyes faced absolutely no penalty for his confession—the statute of limitations had run out years earlier. Before he confessed, Reyes had been moved to Korey Wise’s cellblock. He requested a transfer on the grounds that he feared retaliation from Wise’s gang. All he had to do was confess—with no penalty—and announce that he acted alone.

  8. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    In more civilized times they would have been lynched.

  9. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    I regret entering this thread.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      I regret israelites bringing your ancestors here on slave ships.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      but do you fucking love science?

  10. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    /misc/ should get banned for raiding like /qa/

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >how dare you express negative sentiments about a race that commits brutal wanton violence like it’s a bodily function!

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Lol immediately dropping the nonsense about debunking an exoneration. You can express whatever "sentiments" you want just stop trying to spread your "sentiments" on a blue board meant discuss history and not 21st century idpol.

        Technically racism isn't even allowed off these boards but no one even fucking cares, that rule was made because when this site started it became obvious that some people didn't do want anything but to spam schizo rants. no one cares if you say racist stuff. Just stop trying to convert every fucking discussion into accepting bs. There is a board for this.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      /misc/ lives free in your head

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