>start with the Greeks

>start with the Greeks
I hate this meme, this would take a lifetime to actually do. What can you read instead to summarize the essential Greek contributions to the cannon?

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Shut your whining, there's a perfectly good reading list in the sticky

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on what area you are interested in, OP. :3

    We only have so long to live. If you like history, or philosophy, or language, or mathematics there are indidvidual recs for that.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Read about socrates, plato and aristotle on wikipedia. Then proceed to the Germans.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Also read about them on Wikipedia and proceed to the Analytics. Once you have read their Wikipedia entries you will be more than well read enough to contribute here.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Terrible, if you're interested in Socrates (Plato) and Aristotle, then you should read...

      Plato - Laws
      Plato - The Republic
      Plato - Timaeus
      Aristotle - The Organon
      Aristotle - The Politics
      Aristotle - Physics
      Aristotle - Metaphysics

      Almost in that order, really.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Actually tell you what, read The Organon BEFORE you read any of Plato's works, because Plato writes his works as a Socratic dialogue, the methodology of which is encapsulated by Aristotle's Organon.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Read the wikipedia articles of all these.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Unironically what I did and I minored in philosophy. Wikipedia and Powerpoint slides basically tell you all you have to know about philosophy, didn't read a single fucking book.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Still more respectable than being an actual philosopher.

            https://i.imgur.com/TSNU7Tz.jpg

            >start with the Greeks
            I hate this meme, this would take a lifetime to actually do. What can you read instead to summarize the essential Greek contributions to the cannon?

            Just read what interests you. If you want to read philosophy, read Plato and Aristotle.
            If you want to read history, read Thucydides and Xenophon. If you want fiction, read the Illiad as well as the Greek tragedians like Euripides, Sophocles, and some others. Comedy by Aristophanes, too.
            Start with the greeks never actually entailed you read Spopocles and Eurarchus' dissertation on why the Athenian herms are a little tooclose to the statue to properly fellate. Plus ten billion treatises on shit you don't care about.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Athenian herm's dicks are a little too close to the statue to properly fellate*

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Jon Kolner

    This is the entire extent of the important Greeks with surviving works. These are the books people mean here when they say “start with the Greeks.” Volumes 4 to 11 in the Great Books series. This should definitely not take you an entire lifetime to read unless you are borderline illiterate and have to phonetically sound out every single word.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >These are the books people mean here when they say “start with the Greeks.” Volumes 4 to 11 in the Great Books series.
      >the Greek Books series
      lmao@yourlife

      why the fuck is the Iliad only like 20 pages here? Is this some kind of sparknotes regurgitation of the FOUNDATIONAL texts of human civilization?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No, that is the Iliad. The other tomes you see there are absolutely MASSIVE, they would contain everything listed here

        Terrible, if you're interested in Socrates (Plato) and Aristotle, then you should read...

        Plato - Laws
        Plato - The Republic
        Plato - Timaeus
        Aristotle - The Organon
        Aristotle - The Politics
        Aristotle - Physics
        Aristotle - Metaphysics

        Almost in that order, really.

        and more. I have one of the books in the Great Books series (the one with the mathematics - Euclid and Appollonius et al.) and it has VERY small print. It is not an abridged version, not like Barnes and Noble version or whatever.

        Read the wikipedia articles of all these.

        Don't do this.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Jon Kolner

          Yes, the print is very small, the translations are antiquated and there is zero annotations or secondary resources within the books. I wouldn’t recommend those books for absolute beginners. Rather, I had posted the image to show the OP how little of Greek tragedy, poetry, math, science is left to us today and how “starting with the Greeks” shouldn’t take a lifetime. You could read those texts in a year if you were ultra-dedicated. I read all Plato in a month in 2020.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Hahaha, for the one on mathematics, the work On Conics, book III has like a million editorial errors. More errors than any other book on mathematics I have ever read. And that work is sitting on shelves at Harvard and Yale et al.

            Just kind of funny. The quality is not great.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Jon Kolner

              The Plato translations are by Benjamin Jowett and the Hippocrates translations are by Francis Adams from the early 1800s. I feel like a pleb but I might have to buy the Penguin classics translations of Hippocrates because last time I read On Ancient Medicine, a lot of it went over my head.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Jon Kolner

        If you want to throw in Diogenes Laertius or Plutarch as secondary resources in addition to those texts that is fine but those are the prime first hand sources of Greek thought. They encapsulate Hellenic art and science of antiquity.

        >the small Homer book

        I own that book and I assure you it is all of Homers writings. The font is just really small.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Jon Kolner

        For the record, there’s also Marcus Aurelius, Plutarch and Plotinus in that series but I didn’t include them in the list because they weren’t classical Greek writers.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It doesn't matter, just read what you want

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Working through the canon in chronological order is zoomer achievement collector mentality. That said, reading the Iliad and the Odyssey plus some stuff from Plato, Aristotle and the big three playwrights isn't a bad idea.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I started with the Greeks years ago
    As a basic introduction all you need to read are the following
    Homer
    Hesiod
    Sophocles
    Aristophanes
    Euripides
    Aeschylus
    Thucydides
    Herodotus
    A variety of Plato dialogues
    That's not that much, it took me a few months to get through
    Philosophy is a waste of time but Plato is still worth reading as literature

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    All of what we know about the Greeks is public domain and none of it is particularly difficult. This means it is free and easy to read. Reading a "condensed" version is literally just you paying more to get less.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For canon you can go with the Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, covers most of the important stuff from the greeks to the present. 1st edition is all you need and can be had for cheap used but even the current edition new is not exactly expensive for a 3000+ page book.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I hate frogs

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