Someone better have written a book about constantly changing their mind on being religious, their political orientation, philosophy, etc.


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Someone better have written a book about constantly changing their mind on being religious, their political orientation, philosophy, etc. Basically not being certain on anything…
If not I have found my niche.

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's called having autism and as such being easily influenced by others. I'm sorry

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Okay then; has anyone written a book about having autism and being easily influenced by others?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Stranger by Camus. Not exactly what you’re describing but based on what you’ve said about yourself I feel it could help

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's called being in your 20s. You grow out of it; it's called being in your 30s.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >mid 20s
      not OP, but this started for me when I was 12.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This started when I was 12 and hasn't stopped and I'm 35

      It's called having autism and as such being easily influenced by others. I'm sorry

      I'm not autistic either

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >35
        You're retarded and take other peoples' opinions on too easily. Either you're yourself incapable of forming well though out and rational self coherent ideas, or you're just unable to resist an idea promulgated by someone of higher social status than yourself.

        Humility and acceptance. Changing one's views is fine, but you have to be able to trace a connecting thread throughout that weaves them all together, each insensibly bleeding into the next. If you can't do this you're an NPC.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >but you have to be able to trace a connecting thread throughout that weaves them all together
          Most people have an incoherent and often contradictory set of views that will probably change from the one time you ask them to the next, as it should be. To expect consistency from people in this is zoomer homosexualry.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            To expect it from people is proper; to expect it from NPCs is ludicrous.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          If you're unironically 35 I really don't know what to tell you. I am over 10 years your junior and while I may not have everything figured out, I at least know what's valuable to me and why it's valuable.

          I dunno how to find something like that. I basically internalize all ideas presented to me. By that logic I have nearly every psychological disorder I've read about too. I don't know how you read something without thinking it is being directed at you, or not instantly making it your own thoughts. I don't really understand that stuff at all.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        If you're unironically 35 I really don't know what to tell you. I am over 10 years your junior and while I may not have everything figured out, I at least know what's valuable to me and why it's valuable.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Literally just the Levin chapters in Anna Karenina tbh

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Autobiography of Malcolm X

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Seneca writes about this. Also Aurelius
    >cease discussing what a good man is and be one.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Pessoa to a certain extend, he created so many imaginary people with their religions, worldviews and concerns that it got to a point that he doubted who he really was. He has some passages talking about this in The book of disquiet. I also have read a novel about this but don't remember the name or the author right now, if it appears in my mind i will post again.
    Donkeys are really cool.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    By the age of 20 you should have figured out some fundamental truth to judge life with. Diffusing from one belief to another shows lack of character, it means you're too dumb to set principles for yourself.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      ok anon, what is the fundamental truth to judge life with, then?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        the belief that preserving life comes before anything else. but before you strawman, consider that I'm not trying to sell you my idea. your fundamental truth can be something as dumb as "having money is a metric of success". the point is that you use that idea to judge actions and beliefs. when you read an argument you put your principles against their words, you don't just go 'yeah this sounds good, I guess you're right".

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the belief that preserving life comes before anything else. but before you strawman, consider that I'm not trying to sell you my idea. your fundamental truth can be something as dumb as "having money is a metric of success". the point is that you use that idea to judge actions and beliefs. when you read an argument you put your principles against their words, you don't just go 'yeah this sounds good, I guess you're right".

      I mean you're not totally wrong, I think it's responsible and good to have principles and hold yourself to objective standards. But the way you say this makes it sound like you need to have decisively solved the intellectual aspect of the problem of life in your teenage years, which is utterly absurd. When I was a teen I was totally unequipped to intellectually grapple with anything, and I was much more mature and intelligent than the vast majority of my peers. If you come up with some principle in your teens, it may help you grow, but you should be able to abandon it and embrace a new one if you discover something more truthful later on. Refusing to do so and clinging to old "solutions" would be destructive.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I agree anon, but time isn't on your side. Yeah a lot of people lock themselves into some dumb belief, not arguing that. The thing is that the sooner you figure something out the sooner you can start acting and using your beliefs to set goals and build your life around. That's the whole point I'm trying to make. You don't want to be some guy that just sits all day, arguing with his monitor over shit he doesn't even strongly believe in. You can't be in your 40s still trying to figure out how life works and be undecisive. I mean you can... in fact when a lot of people get older and life slows down, they reflect on old views and change a lot of things. But at that point, who cares, for most of them their best years are behind them.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          And what's not a dumb belief

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I think you don't value human life very highly if this is how you think. Who cares if their best years are behind them? You're not here to get as much work done as quickly as possible in as professional a manner as possible and then die. Life is a journey, and you're here to learn - don't slack off, but there's no benefit to panicked rushing. Take the lessons that come to you and be happy with them, and push yourself, and when you outgrow something, leave it behind you.
          Generally, the traditional views of all cultures I am aware of is that wisdom is a product of age. I know how you feel, and I took the same path - for me, it was all about getting the most wisdom at the earliest possible time in order to execute my journey perfectly. But, getting a theoretical wisdom that you are not living does not necessarily help you live well. Only lessons you learn through living them help you do that. Even if you reach perfect true opinion on every subject, you're still left with the task of living and applying that knowledge.

          [...]
          I dunno how to find something like that. I basically internalize all ideas presented to me. By that logic I have nearly every psychological disorder I've read about too. I don't know how you read something without thinking it is being directed at you, or not instantly making it your own thoughts. I don't really understand that stuff at all.

          Eh, I mean, I am kind of similar. I "ingest" everything I read, it's like my mind becomes what I put into it, for a brief period of time. But if you actually examine your own life instead of a book, and you are honest about this, it'll become pretty clear what your actual values are, and the process won't take too long.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This. 20-21 is when it "clicked" for me who I am in broad strokes. 23 now and working on getting the specifics in order. Should be exactly where I need to be by 30. I feel like this is how a man should be.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Im 30 and have never had any moment like this. I don't know what you're talking about

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Start with the Greeks and stop listening to the tranny fud.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Siddhartha by Hess

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