QTDDTOT - Questions that don't deserve their own thread

Ask all the random questions regarding cooking you want ITT
Here's mine: what's the easiest way to stretch pizza dough evenly?

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Easiest? Pasta roller, but you'll only make long ones rather than round.
    Most efficient? Hand rolling + hand tossing.
    Easiest without special hardware? Hand roll. Turn. Hand roll. Turn. Hand roll. Turn. Ad infinitum.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      Easiest would be a rolling pin, but it will affect the crust. Doing it by hand takes practice, but you'll get the hang of it eventually.

      My question for the thread: what white wine would you pair with ribeye? I don't drink wine and have guests coming over.

      i usually just turned it over only once or twice so that might've been the issue
      could putting too little flour on the dough be an issue? my main problem is that i can never get it to stretch evenly and i've just watched some guy on youtube say it's what happens when you don't use enough flour so maybe i should pay more attention to that

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        [...]
        What's the best way to not get it to stick to the shovel?

        I turn it over twice. You should use enough flour when forming the base, and if you can get it, use (fine) semola flour, it does not absorb moisture as easily as normal flour, so it prevents sticking very well. Lightly dust the pizzapeel, and remove any excess flour from the pizza base when putting it on the peel. Lightly slide around the dough by moving the peel, if it slides freely, you're good to go, if not, add a bit more underneath. Hope this helps.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Admit what?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      Front Right Burner master race

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I use front left more

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Same here. I think it's because I'm left handed.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        front left and back right

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        My stove configuration is the other way around with the big burners in the spots the small ones are, so I use the back right.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          My front left and back right are my biggest ones, but the front left puts out way more oomph than the back right. Front right and back left are little bitches that only get used for small pans when the others are taken.

          Used to use front right the most when it worked. Now have to use back right. Back left has no adjustment anymore so its either off or full wack, handy really only now for boiling pots of water.

          [log in to view media]

          My new apartment's front left has the double burner, so heats the best/quickest. Lefthand chads finally got a win.

          All these people telling me about their stoves.

          I don't fucking care. That was a statement. Not a discussion topic.

          [log in to view media]

          Yes

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        My front left and back right are my biggest ones, but the front left puts out way more oomph than the back right. Front right and back left are little bitches that only get used for small pans when the others are taken.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Used to use front right the most when it worked. Now have to use back right. Back left has no adjustment anymore so its either off or full wack, handy really only now for boiling pots of water.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        [log in to view media]

        My new apartment's front left has the double burner, so heats the best/quickest. Lefthand chads finally got a win.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      it

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Any good recipes that include horseradish that aren't prime rib or steak? I'm looking for like a stew or a soup that has horseradish in it.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      why do people insist on eating horseradish? I just don't get it. even here where it's common I don't see people using it anymore.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Whatever you'd eat with mustard you can eat with horseradish.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Borshch is good with horseradish. A lot of stews are good with some horseradish. Welsh rabbit's good with a bit of horseradish mixed into the sauce.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    yeah its the biggest burner and im right handed, why are you acting like its a crime?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Depending the range's setup (and especially if it's a gas range) it can also be the hottest element. Most electric ranges just kind of run a circuit to the left and one to the right, but sometimes there's actually a bit of damping (resistance) on everything but the front right burner.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    Easiest would be a rolling pin, but it will affect the crust. Doing it by hand takes practice, but you'll get the hang of it eventually.

    My question for the thread: what white wine would you pair with ribeye? I don't drink wine and have guests coming over.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [...]
      i usually just turned it over only once or twice so that might've been the issue
      could putting too little flour on the dough be an issue? my main problem is that i can never get it to stretch evenly and i've just watched some guy on youtube say it's what happens when you don't use enough flour so maybe i should pay more attention to that

      What's the best way to not get it to stick to the shovel?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        fine corn meal

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The basic bitch whites hold up to ribeye, so long as it isn't too overly seasoned. Pinots and even sauvignons are fine but especially chardonnay, even if the steak is well-seasoned. There's a reason people think of chardonnay as a white that drinks like a red.
      While not white by some modern standards, many skin-contact whites AKA so-called "orange" or "amber" wines pair nicely with lamb so I would guess they'd go with beef just as easily.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      White wine

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >750
        Who wants to carry a case of bottles around a public park? proper cheap crap wine needs to come in at least a magnum

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You best have scanned your Co-op card for that fucker, you'd get about 10p back on that cunt.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      None. If you really don't want to serve red wine consider rosé, ask the store manager/wine guy in the supermarket which is best. Firm full-bodied, layered beer (Tripel, Saison) is a far better match than white wine, especially with fries and leafy green salad.

      If you really insist on white wine go for briny whites with lots of minerals (fish sauce works with steak, fishy wine might too): Chablis, Riesling, Muscadet. But not Champagne. Make sure your wine is full-bodied. Older bottles (2016 and older) are usually more expressive and you really need that to match good steak.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    here you go OP here's a good starter video

    my suggestions to add to it are, proof the dough properly in the fridge. take it out of the fridge early and let it come up to room temperature. if the dough is fighting you and doesn't want to stretch out then set it aside and let it rest longer and it will relax and be more workable. with practice comes experience and you'll be able to easily recognize when you need to let it rest more. make sure you weigh ingredients when you're mixing the dough because if the hydration is too low then it will also be difficult to work with

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      >hand stretch a pizza

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        i can only see it when its small... fuck you

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Do you think I can make a stirfry sauce with a bottle of sweet chilli sauce?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Not something I would do, but sure. Sweet chilli sauce + water + Chinese chicken stock powder + mushroom seasoning powder (IE flavoured MSG) + maizena/cornflour/cornstarch.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah I was just curious. I already made my stirfry and it was pretty bad. I used a different sauce though.
        Isn't sweet chili already thick enough? I think cornflour would be excessive. I fucked up today's stirfry by using too much starch, it was a sloppa.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >thick enough
          >cornflour would be excessive
          It's for the water, bro. The water + Chinese chicken stock powder takes the place of real Chinese chicken stock and it would help to thicken it just enough. Don't overstarch.
          That's how you make ketchup chicken. Yes, it's a thing.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That makes sense, thanks.
            To be completely honest I still haven't experimented with msg. I've been wanting to make mushroom seasoning powder myself but I keep procrastinating. I already have some recipe. Maybe some day...

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              [log in to view media]

              >make mushroom seasoning powder
              Wait... wut? We might be misunderstanding each other. I mean this stuff.
              There are other brands (Po Lo Ku is cheap and popular) but I like this one.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                if you grind some dry shiitake/porcini, wouldn't that be a type of mushroom seasoning? Like a healthier msg
                Anyway don't worry about it. I'm just 'tistic. I have a store that imports Asian stuff nearby. I'll look for something like that.
                I usually make edible stir frys, just somehow today I was a neurotic retard and added a ton of cornstarch and it ended up a non-Newtonian mess

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >grind some dry shiitake
                I guess you could do that. I noticed that when wypipo cook any Asian food, they don't use mushroom seasoning powder at all. Even Asian YT cooks don't. It's really weird. Every Viet and Chinese I know uses it. I use it in my Chinese stuff because it's how I grew up having them but I also add it to Korean recipes now that I'm exposed to them. That cucumber salad (or any other one) they make is fucking delicious with some mushroom seasoning in it.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Isn't sweet chili already thick enough?
          Pretty much. Depends on what you want it to coat as a sauce. Add sweet chili sauce (not too much), light soy sauce, a little sesame oil.
          The sugar from the chili will balance out with the soy sauce. Then heat until the sugars in the chili sauce start caramelizing and it thickens again. It's pretty strong, so it works as a coating of the protein for example, but I wouldn't use it as a stirfry sauce that covers the whole dish, or it will overpower all other tastes. In that case you could stretch it out with some stock or something.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'll give it a try, seems easy and I have all of those

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >by using too much starch
          Easy to not overdo: Mix starch and water in a little bowl. Stir to disperse; it won't dissolve. Do not dump it all in. Near the end of cooking, add a little at a time until it's just a little more runny than you want it. It will thicken up a bit when the dish cools.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I hope I'll remember this approach, got kinda drunk today lole. First time having Chianti, and it's really good. Finishing a bottle all by myself today...
            Sweet chilli sauce, sesame oil and light soy sauce was pretty great. Just maybe a bit plain though. I still didn't get any peanut butter or msg powder, but no doubt those can be great too.
            Starch water as a separate thing in the end to make sure the sauce is thick enough, I hope I'll remember this. Stirfries are kinda efficient so I wanna make a lot of them in the near future

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yes. Sweet chili sauce, peanut butter, soy sauce and/or oyster sauce.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Chili and PB does sound like a great combo, too bad I don't have the latter. I'll try what the second anon said with the sesame oil and light soy this time.
        Not gonna flour or cornflour my chicken this time, just salt and pepper. My problem yesterday was that I cornmealed my chicken and I also added cornmeal to my sauce..

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    Is making a chicken pot pie filling and using biscuits on top instead of pie crust still a pot pie or is it casserole at that point? Does that dish have a name or is still just called a chicken pot pie?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Isn't a pot pie a type of casserole? Shepherd's pie has a "crust" of mash on it, yeah? So why would cooking chicken and vegetables in gravy and topping it with a Southern biscuit crust make it any less of a pie than shepherd's pie is? Just eat and enjoy.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Is it actually in a pie crust? If not you've just made a casserole I suppose, but sounds nice.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sounds like chicken cobbler.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I use bottom left because it’s the largest burner on the stove I have

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This video got me making perfect circles: https://youtu.be/GtAeKM_f2WU

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      nice vid. I have the webm version someone posted here in LULZ.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I appreciate how clear his demonstration is given that you can get 95% of it even in the silent webm.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        he makes it look easy but that pizza is going to be doughy and dusty as fuck
        to get a good crust it's going to be a pain in the ass and you need to work quick and smart

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    test

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Are homemade pizzas a pain in the ass to clean up afterwards?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      At first they are. It takes a while to learn how to get the right (non sticky) consistency. If you make them often enough you'll develop a feel for it.

      The real problem with homemade pizza is toppings: you want to put lots of stuff on top and you're left with lots of leftovers/opened jars.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      when you first start it is a total disaster but after a year of making pizzas once or twice a month you'll have it down to a 5-10 minute clean up, the important part is to clean as you go. Once you knead the dough you have a hour to clean and prep the toppings, use it

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        An hour to clean is the very definition of a pain in the ass. Just because there's a window in the cooking process doesn't mean doing more shit necessitated by the recipe is an effective use of my time.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          i do a pretty thorough cleaning, the rest the house be damned but my kitchen must be spotless including vacuuming and a quick damp mopping. i'm also shredding cheese, making sauce, prepping toppings and setting places at the table

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Once you knead the dough you have a hour to clean and prep the toppings, use it
        You let your dough only rise for one hour?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          [log in to view media]

          yea, i know a 24-48 hour ferment would be much better but pizza is usually a spur of the moment meal around my house when someone else doesn't feel like cooking a normal meal.
          i get stuck with all the one off meals like pizza, chili, roasts, turkeys, hams and baking etc.
          I'm making a 10lb ham shank with mash potatoes, corn bread, green beans and roasted carrots, maybe some coleslaw

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            When pizza's spur of the moment around here, I just order a pizza. Pizza's a lot of work for just one or two pies, which is why mine are planned out, usually when I've got a bit of good salami, some tomato sauce ready to go, and a particularly leafy basil plant... I can't imagine being told "I kind of want pizza tonight. You should make us pizza." and not feeling an overwhelming urge to slap down an invoice for my time and cost.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >and not feeling an overwhelming urge to slap
              oh i get that feeling but i also really like pizza and we're on way to tight of a budget to order pizza, i we were to eat like the average person the last 3 weeks of the month would be nothing but ramen

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Unless you already have everything on hand, it's really not much cheaper to make a pie than to snag a Christopher Walk-in special... and judging by the 10lb ham shank with two starch and two veg, you're not doing terribly.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                [log in to view media]

                i have a deep freezer so i buy things when they're on sale, i bought the ham shank on Easter for $0.89 a pound and i make most things from scratch because i buy in bulk. I hit sale for potatoes that are about to go bad and i cook and freeze them.
                It works out to around $30 a head per week which isn't bad for eating hams, pizza, cheese burgers, chicken fajitas, cheese steak sandwiches, beef stew etc.
                It should be noted i grow all my own peppers, tomatoes, beans, peas, green beans and herbs. I used to grow much more but i don't have the space anymore so i focused on what grows best for the least amount of work/cost

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            A cold ferment would indeed be better, but even for same day pizza 1h seems so little, 2-3 would be the absolute minimum.
            What % of yeast are you using in your dough if I may ask?

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              [log in to view media]

              it seems like 2%/2tsp active dry yeast but recently i have been using half that to save on yeast.
              My house id 77f degrees and around 55% humidity
              I fold in for 10 min then hand knead for another 10 min
              let rise in bowl for 1 hour which by then it has more then doubled in size
              i split the dough and forum into balls and let rest on the counter for another 10-15min before stretching out and sliding into a 450f oven with a pizza stone (my oven does 550f but then the cheese is always overcooked before the dough is even remotely cooked )
              picrel is a bad pizza i made where it had to be over cooked so i wasn't eating raw dough

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                That's quite some yeast, but I guess that's needed for such a short rise.
                What weight are the dough balls you make, and what diameter is the pizza you make with it / what thickness?
                My oven goes up to 300°C/572°F, never have an issue with un(der)cooked dough /overcooked cheese at that temp when making pizza's, but I tend to make thin crusts. Does your oven circulate the hot air when baking?

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                [log in to view media]

                >Does your oven circulate the hot air when baking?
                no it doesn't
                385g each and the pizzas are 15" inch across, the dough is stretched pretty thin with a puffy crust at the edge.
                (i put a little cheddar on this one how could you tell )

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >no it doesn't
                That might be the cause then.
                All this talk about pizza, time to make some dough.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No oil your pans with a neutral oil lightly or use semo if your using a forno, only reason why a pan or stone pizza will stick is you've pierced the dough or a lack of lubrication

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        i have never had a pizza stick to a stone and i use 100% hydration, it sticks to everything else but not the stone

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >100% hydration
          post pic? do you use a stand mixer? if not, how do you work the dough?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            [log in to view media]

            ok it seems its like 94% hydration, i hand knead, i start with a rubber spatula and fold in until i can get it on a cold counter top (no flour) and move quickly to knead and fold for 10 min then into a greased bowl for 1 hour, plopped out onto a lightly floured counter and split in half and stretched out into a two pizzas

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              [log in to view media]

              [log in to view media]

              >94%
              that's still pretty high. what sort of flour, and how long do you fold with a spatula before kneading by hand? what temp do you bake at, and with what equipment? sorry to grill you, it sounds very interesting.

              the most I've successfully done is 75% with bread flour (12.7% gluten) and it was pretty hard to work with. I did 80% once where I tried to stretch and fold 4 times over 2 hrs, like I would making baguettes, but it didn't seem like a success. the gluten didn't develop as much as I wanted. picrel is ~70%. it's a bad picture but you can sort of see how high hydration it is by the translucency -- you can see the perforated pan underneath.

              94% sounds like soup to me. I believe it's possible but it sounds like a ton of work, or at least some techniques I don't know. I'd like to try getting that high.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                i start with just the yeast water and add 1 cup of bread flour and mix in until blended and add the second cup and do the same then the third with the rest of the ingredients, this gives the dough autolyse and gluten to develop without salt and oil interfering with gluten development which helps make it less sticky.
                im folding it in the bowl for about ten minutes then hand kneading for another ten
                the oil in it helps it from sticking to the counter top and my hand if i keep it moving

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                wow i think i left out every other word in that post

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                thanks for the tips, anon, I'll try it with an autolyse

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                [log in to view media]

                true me it will still be pain in the ass, i also use fine corn meal on my peel (a glass cutting board)

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                [log in to view media]

                show me that baby baked. here's one I made yesterday with my ~70%

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                its a older pic

                [log in to view media]

                when you first start it is a total disaster but after a year of making pizzas once or twice a month you'll have it down to a 5-10 minute clean up, the important part is to clean as you go. Once you knead the dough you have a hour to clean and prep the toppings, use it

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                nice. I should use more pepperoni.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                nice bubbly crust

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                thin crust sucks and it tastes like cardboard if you eat it cold. for god sakes anon pizza is supposed to be good when its cold

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      Messier at first but easy now. A few big tips that helped me: 1. Prep, portion, and freeze dough so you can pull them out as needed the day of. 2. After stretching the dough, place it on a piece of parchment paper. Put topping on it there and move the entire thing, including paper, to the 3. Pizza stone! It really elevates the cooking process.

      (Parchment paper usually goes up to 500° so if you’re using a legit wood fire or just a powerful oven then replace the parchment paper with a layer of semolina flour

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Roll out your dough with a rolling pin or empty bottle, slightly larger than your favourite pan.
    >Turn your dough 45° while rolling to get a circle
    >Roll your dough slightly thicker than your pizza should be
    >Now oil the bottom of your favourite pan. The part that touches the stove.
    >Gently press it into the dough.
    You now have evenly stretched pizza base with a rustic border.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What are you 5-7 most nutritionally sane and relatively fast dinners for weekdays?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >boil carbs (potato, rice, pasta, bulgur, chic peas, pearl barley, quinoa)
      >meanwhile wok (yes, wok!) thin slices of meat (any meat really), pour away fat, deglaze with stock/wine/beer/water, reduce. Remove from direct heat and add a dollop of quality (!) butter if you must.
      Daily recommended meat is 100 grams. That's a generous slice of boiled ham and no more. A main course at a restaurant is 200 grams of meat. Italians eat a lot more beef than average. Spanish and Italians eat a lot more pork than average. 2 countries with great life expectancy.
      >raw veg with vinaigrette/homemade dressing. Tons of stuff here with different vinegars (sherry, sushi, Chardonnay, malt, mirin), oils (olive, coleseed, nuts, pumpkin, sesame), mustards, yoghurt. Grow shoots in a tray, works all year round, 0 effort.
      >tired of raw veg? Put a steam basket on top of your boiling potatoes/pasta/whatever.
      And just steam finely diced/minced carrots, long beans/peas, any cabbage types, beetroot, endive, asparagus, turnip, parsnip.
      >hit the shops before work, buy what's in season/fresh
      >prepping is everything
      >learn to love your oven
      With these simple tips you have 5-7000 sane and relatively fast weekday dinners instead of 5-7.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sounds pretty good, thanks anon.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        NTA but good tips, anon. thanks. the last three are understated but very legit:
        >>hit the shops before work, buy what's in season/fresh
        is everything
        to love your oven

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Pork, cabbage, potatoes × 7

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My body is going to shit and recently I can't enjoy bell peppers anymore, any type of bell peppers. Even if I cook them, there's this cottony bitter taste and smell ruining the experience. It's not the white stuff inside, I make sure to cut away most of it. The actual flesh tastes off.
    I don't want to stop eating them. Is there a way to undo this or am I permanently fucked being unable to enjoy bell peppers?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >cottony bitter taste
      I'm probably just retarded, but green bell peppers taste the way fresh cut lawn smells to me. I don't have this problem with yellow/red/orange. roasting or cooking the green pepper, especially without the skin, fixes it for me, though. I like me green peppers on pidzer. what type(s) are you using?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        All of them have that off-taste to me now. I used to love them before the last 2 months. Greens are fine too if you mix them into beef sloppas or do that Japanese reverse marinade thing.
        I've done some looking up, and it could be this too.
        https://www.hungryonion.org/t/mothball-taste-in-red-bell-peppers/10411
        Maybe if I give them a long soak and a really thorough scrub I can enjoy them again

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What are some online stores that deliver good food in the UK/England? I sometimes order cookies or mochi but I'm sure there's other good stuff out there.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the secret trick to good pizza crust is buy a ceramic baking stone put that bitch in the oven to preheat for a while you want it very hot
    you prepare the pizza on a well floured baking sheet. slide to pizza onto to the hot baking stone and you will get great crispy crust

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What is yeast and why do I need to keep it alive?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They're microorganisms, they do some chemical reaction stuff that makes stuff rise by creating gas bubbles. They can't do it that if they're dead.

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My grandmother gifted me some stainless steel pots (aluminum triple layer and all that), but just by simply boiling water at low-medium heat they got very discolored (dark brown-orange on the bottom, outside and inside at around the water level) and stay stained like that.

    Is this normal? Is it reversible? It looks like bad.
    I've never used stainless steel pots before.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Bar Keeper's Friend will take off that kind of discoloration.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Thank you!

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Spots on, bro

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    whats the dinner with the best easy to make / leaving an impression ratio, for a 6 man family?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Make something basic like Chili Con Carne

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >basic like Chili Con Carne
        chili con carne can be a little tricky to make good, home style chili is a lot easier to get right

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      wraps/burritos. the only thing you need to cook is the meat, the rest you can bring pre cut/diced, plus you could make the meat ahead and then reheat it at the location.

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i want to elevate my really shitty and lazy and boring and stale etc gringo mexican cuisine into something at least resembling a real craft. how do i learn things, specifically
    >how to prepare meats
    >how to prepare vegetables (and which are best)
    >what spices are good, and how to use them
    >what to budget for quality with bc im poor

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How do I cook?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Put salt on meat then put on fire

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    Hello LULZ. What daily healthy foods are you cooking for yourselves?

    t. Neet. Only know how to cook noodles and fried eggs. Want to learn.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      make mash potatoes
      cut potato into quarters add to pot of water THEN bring to a boil and maintain simmer until they change color/become soft, add some milk, butter and salt
      BAM you mash taters

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      >daily healthy
      healthy is relative but:
      >spanish tortillas
      >greek salads
      >salad with chicken, e.g. caesar
      >healthy soups -- zucchini soup, tomato bisque, turkey sausage with vegetables, couscous and kale, etc
      >garbanzo shit: hummus, falafel
      if you want to learn, chef john's foodwishes is a reasonable start.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        [...]
        with chicken, e.g. caesar
        first, just learn to cook chicken breast in a pan consistently, and the sky is the limit. it goes with anything.

        Are air fryers good cooking tools for beginners?

        t. Household has two airfryers, normal oven, and microwave oven

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          air fryers are basically small convection ovens, and I think they're reasonably good at being small convection ovens. they're good for beginners in that you can find plenty of low effort "food hack"-style recipes for them but you won't learn much about cooking (but maybe you don't care about that). if your aim is just to add some easy meals to your repertoire, I think there is plenty of opportunity with air fryers.

          do you have a stovetop/range and some pans? that's the best place to start learning how to cook if your aim is to develop your skills. it's slightly more effort to learn, but over time it will become effortless and you will be very versatile.

          if you have use of an oven, I also recommend roasted vegetables. extremely easy, filling, tasty and healthy. that's another good starting place.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      >daily healthy
      healthy is relative but:
      >spanish tortillas
      >greek salads
      >salad with chicken, e.g. caesar
      >healthy soups -- zucchini soup, tomato bisque, turkey sausage with vegetables, couscous and kale, etc
      >garbanzo shit: hummus, falafel
      if you want to learn, chef john's foodwishes is a reasonable start.

      with chicken, e.g. caesar
      first, just learn to cook chicken breast in a pan consistently, and the sky is the limit. it goes with anything.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      There's no such thing as healthy foods apart from garlic and olives/oil. Every other ingredient has advantages and disadvantages, as in: basil is healthy for X, but harmful for Y. Lard (used to be the devil) has some very healthy properties.

      Heating most cured/salted/smoked meats is a terrible idea, you may as well start smoking tobacco: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrosamine

      A really good idea is to buy diverse and in season. Prime produce tastes better and has more nutrients than its out of season cousins. Milk products are better in May, so is asparagus. Cherries are better in June. Pheasant, pig and hare need to be young.

      For some reason "being in season" also means the healthier aspects of an ingredient trump its disadvantages and vice versa: eating tomatoes and lettuce in winter does more harm than good to your body. That's what they do right in Spain, Italy and Japan. It's also why France and Belgium (with very similar diets) lag behind in life expectancy.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Even garlic can wreak havoc on people with IBS or bacterial/yeast infections in their GI, and olive oil can suffer from the same store-n-scrub issues the spergs on here freak out about. Even the purest of cold pressed, virgin olive oil is still calorically rich - if you overdo it, you'll put on weight. Pros and cons to everything - the poison's in the dosage, Moderation in all things, especially moderation. That whole bag of bags.

  25. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I use the front left burner exclusively unless I have more then one pot/pan on the stove.

  26. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Does cooking in a restaurant kitchen offer you any useful skills? I like cooking at home, and don't really need a job but it sounds interesting and lots of decent places seem to be willing to hire people with no experience and train them.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You'll get a lot faster at everything including consuming your drugs of choice.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I got a lot better at time management and multitasking, and not being such a god damned pushover. The only time that sort of zen-prestissimo autopilot kitchen dance comes out is when I'm doing a multi-course meal for a whole tableful of people, but transferable skills like the ability to function under pressure, task delegation, and even the ability to learn on the fly can come out of it. If you think you can learn these things on your own, or if you know that you crack or blow up under pressure, then skip the restaurant work - it's just a fast-paced food factory, and it does take its toll on people's love of food.

  27. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    Retard here who has barely ever cooked. I really wanna get into cooking more but i barely even have anything to cook with, aside from a skillet and some pots and a crock pot. What type of pans or whatever should i get? Any recommended ones for cooking rice or stir fries or noodles?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You probably shouldn't buy anything else until you learn more basics. How big is the stuff you have now?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      you have more then enough to make plenty of different dishes.
      Make pot roast in the crook pot
      Make some different egg dishes like omelettes and whatnot in the skillet

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Maybe a baking tray if the skillet isn't oven safe. You're pretty well set for most things.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Rice can be done in a pot. If cooking space is at a premium but counterspace isn't, you can get a rice cooker. Stir fries kind of need heat - the kind even most gas ranges won't do - so if you're stuck makeshifting it, you can probably get away with your skillet - especially if it's stainless or carbon steel. If it's teflon, don't put it on stupid hot heat. Noodles you can do in any pot that will fit them - which is just about any pot.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        electric coil stoves are actually hotter then gas stoves (unless you have a jet burner which almost nobody in the western world does)
        Also i think a insta pot is a better investment then a rice cooker because it makes rice just fine plus it can make so many other things

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      another god damn weeaboo obsessed with noodles and stir-fry. you guys should be branded. get a pan that's big enough to hold as much food as you're looking to cook and just start cooking. if it sucks, make it better next time. it does not fucking matter what material it's made of. it doesn't matter what kind of stovetop you're using. i made a skillet pizza on an open campfire that looked and tasted better than more than half of any pizza i've seen on this site in almost 11 years. heat is heat.

  28. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    say you want to thicken a sauce but can't be bothered to melt butter in a separate pan, can you just mix up oil and flour in a bowl and add that?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You could, or room temp butter and flour (basically what beurre manié is), or cornstarch and water. Or add some okra if you don't mind a little greenery in there.

  29. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    I'm a degenerate so I use the left back burner

  30. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Can coffee grounds be reused? I'm using cold brew method if that matters.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Technically yes, but most of everything you want comes out in the first extraction, and most of the stuff you don't is what you'd get with a second.

  31. 3 weeks ago
    Sage

    How long will cut veg last in the fridge? Half an onion, half a bell pepper, etc

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      According to health and safety anywhere I've worked - 2 days. According to experience at home, 1-2 weeks. Onions start drying out and smelling kind of wrong before they go bad. Peppers will wither and eventually start growing mold.

  32. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Say you've finely sliced the leaves and shredded the core of a head of cauliflower: what main would work best with cauliflower slaw as a side dish? I'd rather not go the typically barbecue route but I'll do it if no better suggestion comes along.

  33. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I ate some salsa that was still sealed but was one year and three months past the sell by date several hours ago. How long until I find out if I ate some botulism?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Should be fine unless the contents fizzed when you opened the jar (and even then, you'd likely still be fine).

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Should I finish the jar? It was still tasty.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I mean... I wouldn't... but you do you, boo.

          Whatever you'd eat with mustard you can eat with horseradish.

          But mustard is good and horseradish is an affront to all that is good and Godly.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            But all the best mustard has horseradish in it, anon.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              No.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Are you using fake wasabi as mustard?

  34. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I reuse pickle juice by just tossing in some new cucumbers and letting them sit for a while. The last 2 out of 4 times I’ve done this the pickles turn out carbonated when I open them 2 weeks later.

    What am I doing wrong? I make sure everything is clean and boil the brine/cucumbers in the jar before sealing them.

  35. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    anyone with two brain cells to rub together cooks on front left and stages their ingredients and so on left of the stove on the counter.
    Secondary burner is back right because it's a natural pivot point for the arm, same distance from elbow.
    If you're cooking front right you have NO natural pivot point for your second pot or pan, and no way to easily reach your ingredients on the counter without moving.

    Unless you're a left-handed freak or a one-pan chump this just doesn't apply.

  36. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    Can I get some advice for using a stainless steel pan on one of these? I have no trouble on a gas stove but on glass top everything sticks and burns.

  37. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Are cast iron pans a meme?
    I see a lodge skillet on sale for $20 on amazon and im considering on buying one

Your email address will not be published.