Patrician ETF portfolios

I read someone here the other day mention SCHD/JEPI/VOO as a patrician portfolio. What about VTI/JEPI or SPY/QQQ/JEPI?

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    TQQQ JEPI SCHD

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    67% VTI
    33% VEA

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you think that’s redundant

    TQQQ JEPI VOO/IVV

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    as a pajeet I am extremely jealous of 1sties just because of this
    you can have a global stock-bond portfolio that covers almost entire world market, with minimal fee and very good tax policies, yet many disregard that and invest in memestocks or crypto like retards.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm Canadian and I feel the same. We still pay 15% withholding tax on dividends for American companies we invest in. For certain companies it's even higher. I pay like 37% foreign withholding tax on dividends for Energy Transfer because it's an LP I think.
      The plus side is that Canadian banks are actually great dividend payers and we get certain tax benefits on dividends from Canadian companies.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        don't you have canadian vanguard and ishares that more or less alleviates that problem? ben felix's buddy justin bender has a webpage and shit about that

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Going both SCHD and VOO/SPY/NQ/whatever seems counterproductive
    you either believe the following:
    A) Interest rates will stay elevated, so the 'free money' which allowed NQ company valuations to explode is no longer available
    or
    B) Interest rates will go down, 'free money' will continue, allowing insane valuations to persist

    If A, get SCHD (you want companies with strong balance sheets/low debt) or if B, get more broad scale ETFs like spy/VOO or NQ to take advantage of that.
    JEPI and other high yield funds are for people who are no longer contributing to their accounts and need income. JEPI/XYLD/NUSI/DIVO is the combo I use; it gives me a SPY beta weighted delta of .5 and a 8-9% yearly yield on my capital.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      As an addendum to this, if you want 'diversification' from SCHD, my suggestions are SCHY (SCHD criteria for companies outside of the USA) and O (REIT, which SCHD/SCHY don't incorporate).
      I'm retired, but I'm building an account for my son which is 70% SCHD 20% SCHY 10% O because I believe that the federal funds rate will not go back to 1-3% in my lifetime. So far it has beaten the market by a significant amount.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Noted, thanks. I don't add to taxable anymore, just trading accounts

      >t. retired

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      What about folks who want growth and dividends?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        That's another way of saying companies with strong balance sheets/don't rely on debt/actually make money; so SCHD (& SCHY + O if you want what I'm doing for my son).
        NQ companies were king when it was functionally free to borrow money and grow endlessly without producing anything of value. You'll note that over this year as the federal funds rate increased those companies all underperformed; whereas today when JPOW suggested that the rate of increase of the federal funds rate may potentially slow, they did better than real companies (SCHD).
        It all boils down to what you believe the federal reserve will do.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          O over VNQ?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >B) Interest rates will go down, 'free money' will continue, allowing insane valuations to persist
      Even in this scenario, the capital appreciation of SCHD has been very competitive with VOO.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    WUUUUEEEEEEEEEEEHHH

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Pardon my ignorance, but what's the chief difference between VOO and VOOG?

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    how about sdiv?

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Vanguard is a scam. So is BlackRock.

    Vanguard is the largest stockholder of BlackRock, which owns Aladdin - algorithmic trading software which engages in HFT and other sketchy acts. Essentially BlackRock takes your money, buys majority stock in companies, influences their decisions to support ESG scores, turns the company “diverse,” and then takes their marketing and turns it into a pro-obese Black Woman mill, then their stooges takes the company’s own reserve money and reinvests it back into BlackRock to do more of the same. They own everything now, and are pushing for complete corporate fascism. Yes, BlackRock will make you TONS of money in the short run…until the obese black woman twerking while watching biracial transgender children lapdancing for drag queens in a commercial for aspirin for no fucking reason Ponzi scheme collapses. Invest your own damn money.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Stock picking is fine but you do know it's only a matter of time before VG owns a majority of that stock

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm low IQ and don't trust myself to pick my own stocks but still want the benefits. They are still a better option than leaving it all in cash.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >SCHD/JEPI/VOO
    I would take this over the others. It's more conservative and focused on income earners. That said, SCHD is nice, but these days I might suggest VOO/FNDF/JEPI instead. Too much comovement and double exposure with SCHD, unless the portfolio has changed a lot recently.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      interesting, why FNDF over SCHF?

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    For me it's VHT

    It's my way of coping when I see fat >people everywhere I go.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    No idea why people pick VOO over VO

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm so fucking poor reading this thread feels like I'm translating an alien language.

    I start a new job tomorrow, my mind and body aren't in good shape but I'm gonna do my best.
    If I grind 55 hours a week I can make 4.9k taxes.

    I currently have $117 left to my name put it into crypto alts just riding small percentage gains and pulling out.

    I'm going to try to get back to my original 80k that I had last year or I'm going to die trying.

    Wish me luck gentlemen and don't pray last three people prayed for me and right after my life got rekt multiple times over.

    I hope to come back here as a success story, I cut of all my rich frens as I don't want to end up being some sob story leech on their lives.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'd replace VOO with VTI but that's just me

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    True chads invest in actively managed mutual funds. Only cucks put their money in low-fee zero effort passive ETFs.
    I can give you a list of my top funds if you'd like.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Why would someone want a growth ETF rather than compound dividends?

      Fuck it, shoot your shot, let's hear it

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Let’s hear your list

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I see JEPI being recommended a lot here, would it be a good move to buy some now or wait a bit to see if it will correct down a bit?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      JEPI uses covered calls to pay its dividend. It's unlikely to keep the prices and yield it's at. Even the fund managers say the current yield is unsustainable.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Jepi tends to trade like a bond at 10y yields + 7% equity risk premium. Its absolute yield is vol based from shorting calls, so if vol goes up then absolute yield goes up and price follows. Inverse is also true if vol goes down, absolute yields go down and the price goes down to compensate.

      10y movements have relative pricing effects, 10y yield goes down then jepi appreciates to maintain equity risk premium. 10y yield goes up, jepi's price drops to maintain equity risk premium.

      Jepi is taxed 15% qualified divvies / 85% ordinary income, so SCHD is better for (no)taxxmaxxing. I would wait to see if rates jump one more time in Dec at FOMC, but the fed will be cutting in q1 or q2 2023.

      >JEPI
      This is a covered call etf, which means almost no capital appreciation. Might as well go with SCHD since you get high cashflow as well as competitive capital appreciation.

      Jepi is 80% Equity, 20% harvesting premium from spx ELNs, different strat than covered call etfs which write against the full portfolio. There is room for appreciation if spx gains > 10y yield + 7% in 1 year, as that's the targeted return. Its principal generally moves as I wrote above.

      >SCHD
      3% doesn't sound like high cashflow

      look at divvy history, mostly increases each quarter. It maintains 3% against appreciating principal. Powerful when compounded.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    300% UPRO PORTFOLIO

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >JEPI
    This is a covered call etf, which means almost no capital appreciation. Might as well go with SCHD since you get high cashflow as well as competitive capital appreciation.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >SCHD
      3% doesn't sound like high cashflow

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, a lot of US heavy funds cuck out at 3%. I personally have money in IQIN (Nylife international etf) which is sitting at about 4.5%
        It's easy to pick kings aristocrats or other worthy corps with higher yields than SCHD, FNDF, VOO, NOBL, etc. You can literally just split between Intcel, IBM, O, some sin stocks, and telco and pop out at over 5% without even touching international.

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I started buying VOO this year without realizing that I was going to get raped by taxes, apparently there is another ETF based on Ireland(VUAA I belive) which is better for my country laws.
    Anybody buys VUAA instead here? I dont see that much volume with my broker.

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm up 8% YTD on VPU (Vanguard Utilities ETF). Decent dividends, mostly filled with monopolies, and people will always need utilities so it feels like a decent recession play.

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    SCHD for me

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    if your investing horizon is 10+ years you should include SOXX as 25% or 20% of your ETF portfolio. Avoid SOXL

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you are Bogle Chad, you need to look into small cap value etfs like AVUV.

    A portfolio could have
    30% broad market vti/voo
    30% avuv
    20% international/EM
    10% bonds
    Some divy income play for the rest

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      If you want to get real freaky as a Boglehead, I've read about splitting value growth all the way down like VOT, VBR, VUG etc.

  24. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    JEPI seems like a good play on its own at the surface but what concerns me is the portion of its funds that are put in ELNs.
    I don't know a ton about them but I looked into it a tiny bit a while back and I recalled coming to the conclusion that they're a bit of a black box and potentially illiquid in a dump.
    Anyone with more insight into this? I understand covered calls and options just fine, that isn't the issue.

  25. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Personally, I'm essentially a boomer, I'm 80% VTI/VXUS 11% VBR/VOE 9% BND. I'd consider dipping my toes into JEPI but I don't know enough about it.
    My small and value tilt has helped me a good bit this year and I believe it will continue as it historically has in the long-run.
    I was in a lot of covered call ETFs earlier this year when the market got way too overheated, but I got out of those this summer. They were sort of a hedge against the peak of clown world insanity of 2021.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I like VBR and VOE, no VOT?

  26. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i'm a absolute newfag in investing
    can anyone shill me a few cheap ETFs
    i'm from europe if that matters

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