Life during classical antiquity was short, ugly, and brutal.


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Life during classical antiquity was short, ugly, and brutal. It was an extremely violent and unhygienic era, where you could die from a small cut or be arbitrarily killed by your leader. Plagues were common and you were almost guaranteed to be a slave or an oppressed peasant/pleb. The streets were covered in raw sewage. Was it a dark age?

  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    city is for hedonists and women, because women can't live in rural areas and want the easy life their orbiters compete to give them

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/HPFI5vX.jpg

      Life during classical antiquity was short, ugly, and brutal. It was an extremely violent and unhygienic era, where you could die from a small cut or be arbitrarily killed by your leader. Plagues were common and you were almost guaranteed to be a slave or an oppressed peasant/pleb. The streets were covered in raw sewage. Was it a dark age?

      Abortion replaced infant mortality. Your entire thread is crap. Mods delete everything.

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    I mean once the Antonine Plague hit, it was literally no better than the Middle Ages.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      You realize they had plagues before the 2nd century right?

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Not just plagues; many diseases were endemic in Roman cities. We know, for instance, that malaria was endemic in the city of Rome between the 1st and 5th centuries AD; a fairly recent study found that a lot of Roman-era burials showed signs of malarial parasites.

        Height is falling extremely fast right now, people will be that height in a generation.

        And people today are less genetically healthy than they were one, three or five generations ago, though for a different reason than the Romans. Our problem today is that modern medicine has allowed far more children to survive infancy and have children of their own when their combined genetic defects should have killed them off. The result is that the mutational load ("the total genetic burden in a population resulting from accumulated deleterious mutations") is increasing rapidly. One thing you might want to keep your eye on, fellow collapse enthusiast, is the rate of autism in the population; it's a good, clear, widely diagnosed proxy for the total genetic burden.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          It's actually because evolution is fake but whatever.

          Oddly enough that's how it was everywhere for a long time. Benjamin Franklin once wrote a paper how it was interesting that city folk were always going extinct bc they would have less children then it took to replace them so the rural people were always coming in and replacing them. Happened throughout cities during the industrial revolution as well. England famously thought they were going to run out of workers bc disease kept killing them in the cities.

          >workers bc disease kept killing them in the cities.
          That hasn't changed.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      It was bad much earlier. If you look at average male height, you can see the deleterious effects of urban life; both pre-Roman Italians and post-Roman Italians were taller than Roman Italians. This also matches what Roman writers constantly talk about, which is that barbarians are taller and more sturdy than Romans. The significance of this is that within Europe, average male height is a strong indicator of population health.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Height is falling extremely fast right now, people will be that height in a generation.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        But the Roman Italians founded and maintained the greatest empire in human history. Caesar wrote that the Gauls would laugh and taunt the Romans for their short stature, and when they saw the Romans building siege towers far from the walls, they mocked that such small men could not move so large a thing over such a great distance, but as the tower inched closer and closer they would lose their nerve and be slaughtered. The Romans were short but they were tough and had brains

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Germans were taller but weaker and skinnier.
        Romans were shorter but stronger and sturdier.
        Source: I vaguely remember reading this on LULZ

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          Nah, the Romans respected the Gauls for their size and ferocity, but did weren't afraid to fight them. The Gauls were terrified of the Germans for being even larger and more aggressive than themselves, but still the Romans didn't hesitate to meet them on the battlefield

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          That's unlikely; height is strongly correlated with upper body strength. What's more, Roman authors made comments about the large frames and general strength of the barbarians.

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Roman Cities populations literally couldn’t replace themselves cause they died at such a high rate and needed constant replenishment from the outside

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Oddly enough that's how it was everywhere for a long time. Benjamin Franklin once wrote a paper how it was interesting that city folk were always going extinct bc they would have less children then it took to replace them so the rural people were always coming in and replacing them. Happened throughout cities during the industrial revolution as well. England famously thought they were going to run out of workers bc disease kept killing them in the cities.

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    [...]

    Read a single book about Roman history + you will never be a Roman

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Your books are pathetic. Rome never exceeded 100,000 people and your thread is utter garbage.
      The failaids pandemic has the same mortality as Roman plagues.

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Literally all of us

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        I also have a cat

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      the Neet in the Attic.

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >was short, ugly, and brutal. It was an extremely violent and unhygienic era, where you could die from a small cut or be arbitrarily killed by your leader. Plagues were common and you were almost guaranteed to be a slave or an oppressed peasant/pleb. The streets were covered in raw sewage.

    You have described life in LatAm

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Plagues were a natural consequence of urban growth. Every positive development also has negative consequences. It's easy to paint even the modern world as a hellhole.

  8. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    History = over 25 years ago = dark ages, all of it
    Present = less than 25 years ago = THE darkest age

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      The dark ages began when we stopped being apes that lived by hunting and gathering - we ate the fruit of knowledge, and from that we have suffered and were cast out of the bliss that animals so valiantly bear.

  9. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    bump

  10. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, I'm tired of people romanticizing the era

  11. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    No wonder dying a glorious death on the battlefield was appealing.
    You could die at any moment and be forgotten or roll the dice and be remembered forever.

  12. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >plagues were common
    But le invented chingkike's virus psyop!

  13. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Was it a dark age?
    No because we got written documents from. Life could literally be wh40k but as long as there are written sources that paint a clear enough narrative for historians to follow it isn't a dark age by definition.

  14. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Life during late capitalism was short, ugly, and brutal. It was an extremely violent and unhygienic era, where you could die from abortion or be arbitrarily killed by your leader. Bioweapons were common and you were almost guaranteed to be a slave or a pointless retail job. The streets were covered in raw sewage. Was it a dark age?

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