LEON BLOY DESPERATE MAN

bought the desperate man from leon bloy. what am i in for?

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Basité

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      qéq

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >catholic chudcel
    Oh no no no no no

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      so its kino?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        He's a great writer. I haven't read The Desperate Man, just Disagreeable Tales and some other miscellanea. He's Nabe's favourite author, same vitriolic spleen. Unlike Nabe he seemed to be a truly bizarre and anti-social personality.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          who is nabe?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Marc-Édouard Nabe
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc-%C3%89douard_Nabe

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              its a great shame that they took his talkshow debut off YT

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Cinge

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            https://wikinabia.com/L%C3%A9on_Bloy

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Léon Bloy appears in the first pages of the first volume of Nabe's diary, Nabe's Dream:

              "Monday, July 4 [1983]. - I can't go very long without reading Bloy. A few lines in these superficial and confused years are like fanatical whips whose clarity strikes the dark frivolity everywhere. It is awful to feel energetically pessimistic in this generalized soft optimism. What is beautiful about religion is that it is the Opium of the People, for drugs are the best thing that can happen to the People.

              Nabe on Bloy:

              "In short: Bloy! Bloy! On all sides! Impregnable fortress! I had not received a literary, cosmic and human shock of this calibre since Suarès, Powys and Céline: I was desperate to find a fourth thief of the class of these Christs! I was served! For months and months I lived with Bloy, skinning the carrion everywhere! He is so close to me, to my nature and my aspirations. Absolutely crazy about his language as well as his character (you have to be Borges or Jünger to find him unsympathetic, and one of my great regrets in life is not to corner the first one for five minutes in a patio and the second one in the Black Forest to talk to them about Bloy, which they don't talk about with anyone, and for good reason!...), about his mysticism as well as his mentality, his medievality and his hatred! Everything! I like everything about him! Everything! It is very simple.

              Bloy is an elephantine turtle, as fast as a cheetah. A big bulldog with a moustache, looking like a bear on fire. Two buggy eyes, bursting in the blue of the sky, streaming in bacchantes in fire of straw! A bulldozer that stinks of garlic and big red, that cries five hours a day, sends the whole world to hell, puts his fate in God's hands and takes God's fate in his own hands. He is a family beggar, a poor man with a temperament, a bourgeois petty beggar, who survives meagerly on the savings of his misery, living in extremis on debtor miracles, beating up Heaven itself, because God has no smell!...

              It is absolutely impossible to doubt Catholicism when one is aware of the black magic of Leon Bloy converting a Danish woman, making a whore into a mystic, feeding his children with copious Hail Marys until two of them reach the right hand of the Lord more quickly!... It is not surprising that the great Catholics ignore Bloy, for they are all general repetitions, consequences or caricatures of him." (Au régal des vermines, 2012 (1985), p. 112)

              "Léon Bloy is not a little Catholic, he is a great Christian. He is beautiful. All his pictures will tell you that. In the mirror of his writing, he appears as the magnificent cross between a pig and a buffalo, the white mane of a lion under the snow and the mouth of a bulldog bristling with a gigantic mustache." ("Bloy, toujours," Le Quotidien de Paris, December 7, 1988)

              "Bloy's work cannot be read. It is deciphered." ("Pages arrachées au carnet d'un bloyen", Les Dossiers H "Léon Bloy", May 1990)

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Junger was very interested in Bloy at one point and really encouraged people around him to read Bloy, so I'm not sure what that comment means exactly.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                https://fresques.ina.fr/europe-des-cultures-en/fiche-media/Europe00113/ernst-junger.html

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                It's a machine translation of Nabe, the nuance of meaning is lost.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The translator of this has also (self)published lots of translations from Bloy and other French decadents/symbolists/naturalists from the period, poetry mostly. He leaves interesting 'reviews' of them of Goodreads, and seems like a good interesting, probably a bit older, somewhat dissident, guy

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Same guy, Richard Robinson, also did the published academic translation of Bataille's history book on Gilles de Rais, which is excellent. Highly recommend his translations in general.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Poor mind’s Nietzsche?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      but nietzsche himself was just a poor mans wagner

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Was Nietzche a lunatic Catholic and French patriot?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nietzsche would have immediately converted to Catholicism if he had read Salvation Through the israelites.

      Bloy > Dostoevsky, and Carl Schmitt agrees

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    holbecque

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I’ve read a little of Words of a Demolitions Contractor. I’m a total dimwit having to look up so much but he is a good writer. In Junger’s Paris War Journals near the end of the war he reads a lot of Bloy and that made me interested in him.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just read it.

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