Is Void Linux based?

Is it based?

  1. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    yes.

  2. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    No.

  3. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Void Linux is based. No, really. Super based. Omega based. Void Linux was built in such a way that it’s basically one of the most feature complete Linux distros that we’ve seen in recent times. The developers of Void Linux are always listening to the community and make sure that their distro is up to the task of providing the best possible experience for everyone. That is the philosophy behind Void Linux and it is the main reason why it’s so popular.

    Even though the software center isn’t as good as in the past or as featured in newer distributions, Void Linux is still a very good distro that I would recommend to anyone looking for a new distro. After using Void Linux for a while, I found that it wasn’t really something that I would just use to replace my current distro. But I think that it has plenty of value for those looking for a new distro or for those who are interested in playing with a different flavor of Linux.

    Void Linux is available for a wide variety of different architectures and, because it’s based on Arch Linux, it works on all kinds of different hardware. Even though it’s a Linux distro, I think that it’s something that works great on the Mac. The developers and supporters of Void Linux are super friendly and the distro works great on pretty much any hardware out there. I’ve heard from a lot of people who use it and absolutely love it. And they are usually pretty big Linux users so they know what they are talking about. I’ve also talked to some people who use Void Linux and can’t stand it. I think that’s pretty normal. Not everyone will like the distro. OP, I think you should try it.

    • 11 months ago
      sagium sagemus

      is it a copypasta?
      also
      >because it's based on arch linux
      no it fucking isn't

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        Void Linux is based on Arch Linux, but includes extra packages and utilities to create a more modern desktop.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Void Linux is based on Arch Linux
          no it isn't

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            >alpine
            what about void musl?

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              >void musl
              I installed this on hardware and had to switch to glibc. musl is a meme

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                but you use alpine, which has musl

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                >musl is a meme
                Yes it is, but what I like about it is that it doesn't work proprietary malware like steam and widevine. More freedom respecting than "GNU" libc

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                > I didn't need that anyway
                So much coping

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              op from

              is this bait
              [...]
              alpine
              rocking it on my thinkpad r40

              it's alright but void musl doesn't have 32-bit so take care if you have much older hardware
              to add more, void's kernel is bloated so you either optimize and compile your own or use alpine's kernel config and compile it if you want to use void

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                >void's kernel is bloated
                how so?

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          Source: my ass

          Void has fewer packages than arch bruv, learn to read!

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >based on Arch
      What the fuck are you talking about you idiot?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >based on arch
      wtf?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Void of packages

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      sudo pacman delete post

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      lol

  4. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    what's better for older hardware? void or artix? not running systemd lmao

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Void Linux is the best Arch-based distro you'll find.

      It's my go-to Linux distro. I haven't used Debian since the "testing/unstable" era, and I've used Ubuntu since release 1.0, the GNOME-based version. Void Linux provides a familiar install process and a nice selection of software with an awesome userbase. Void isn't bloated, and it isn't minimalist - its developers have made Void Linux a distribution that simply works well. I consider Void Linux the "Arch for the masses." I really like the new project's philosophy: it supports the software and utilities that Linux users need, it doesn't force any new features, and it makes good use of the underlying Linux technology.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        What's your favorite part of Arch that Void kept?

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          The customizability options.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          To be fair xbps copy/pasted the flags from Pacman.
          Xbps-src is a ripoff of abs.
          Even the founder said he was inspired by Arch to do it.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        Stop being a retard. Void Linux is an independent distro

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >I've used Ubuntu since release 1.0
        clear bait since the first release of ubuntu was called 4.4

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          some people in the ubuntu community like to refer to the first ubuntu release as ‘1.0’. its weird

  5. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Is it based?
    based

  6. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes

  7. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    test

  8. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Based on what?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Based on Arch.

  9. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    There is literally no reason for Void to exist other than "muh systemd bad".

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      also because the neofetch looks cool

  10. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Is it based?
    based on what?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      on arch linux

  11. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    yes

  12. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    yes, pic related

  13. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >initramfs takes 3h to load and uncompress from SSD by default
    I cut it down to like 10s by removing unused modules but it's still too big what am I doing wrong?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      make your own and if you don't use a encrypted root partition there is literally no reason to use an initramfs

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >make your own
        I was just fucking around with dracut config files to achieve this
        how do I "make my own" not through dracut or mkinicpio?
        >if you don't use a encrypted root partition
        I do but if I wasn't what what do I type in grub.cfg? just point it to the real root?

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          I don't use grub because I hate that overcomplicated piece of trash but you just need to point the root partition on the kernel command line linux root=/dev/sda1 or you can use partuuid root=PARTUUID=yourrootpartuuid

          for the initramfs you can unpack it with lsinitrd and remove all the bloat you don't need and replace the init script with a custom one. google is your friend

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            I'm only using grub because syslinux doesn't support full disk encryption
            >you can unpack it with lsinitrd
            will try comparing initramfs from arch which boots up pretty fast to see what's causing the issue
            thanks for help fren

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              it's not very hard to make an initramfs that unlock your encrypted drive
              #!/bin/sh
              mkdir -pv /usr/src/initramfs/{bin,dev,etc,lib,lib64,mnt/root,proc,root,sbin,sys}
              cp -a /bin/busybox /usr/src/initramfs/bin/
              cat > /usr/src/initramfs/init << "EOF"
              #!/bin/busybox sh
              /bin/busybox --install -s
              mount -t proc none /proc
              mount -t sysfs none /sys
              mount -t devtmpfs none /dev

              cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda2 root
              lvm lvchange -a y lol/root
              lvm lvchange -a y lol/swap
              lvm vgmknodes
              mount /dev/mapper/lol-root /mnt/root
              swapon /dev/mapper/lol-swap
              rescue_shell() {
              exec sh
              }
              exec switch_root /mnt/root /sbin/init
              EOF

              chmod +x /usr/src/initramfs/init
              cd /usr/src/initramfs
              find . -print0 | cpio --null -ov --format=newc | gzip -9 > /boot/initramfs.gz
              echo "initramfs written to /boot"

              this is the minimal way with busybox but you can use dracut to make an init with the modules you need and then just remove the bloat and replace the init.

  14. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's better than Artix but still suffers from the usual rolling release and FHS problems.

  15. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    very based if you like something clean bsd like but with a Linux environment, xbps is such a good and fast package manager, runit is so easy to manage too, i've used it for 4~5 years now not a single breakage pretty happy with it and it philosophy

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