I'm trying to understand the difference between a volume and partition, I watched someone get hit by a car last week and realised I needed to enc...

I'm trying to understand the difference between a volume and partition, I watched someone get hit by a car last week and realised I needed to encrypt my shit incase I die which was easy, but I don't like not understanding things even though they work
>read tech forum
>think of a hard drive as a filing cabinet, a partition is the drawers and a volume is the folders inside the drawer
>next reply
>think of a hard drive as a filing cabinet, a volume is the drawers and a partition is folders inside the drawer
I feel like crying

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    partition is drawer, volume is folder

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    volume is like how big something is
    no idea what a partition is

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    > I needed to encrypt my shit incase I die

    Anon, once youre ded, your troubles are literally over. Nobody gives a fuck about you even when ure alife, what makes u think they will care about your porn and hentai once ded

    A partition is a drawer, the volume is the folder, a volume doesnt have to occupy the whole partition space.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    assuming you're talking about Windows, volumes are just labels (C:, D:, E:) for partitions and network resources (most commonly a partition or a part of it shared over a network).
    you refer to "volumes" because to access files on a partition you need to assign it a letter. this letter specifies a given partition on a given drive or a network share or a DVD drive, etc.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      it is possible for a volume to not have a label though, so your definition is shit

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        the question is about partitions and volumes, no one cares about the generic bullshit term that means nothing
        you almost never refer to physical partitions on Windows, you assign a letter to them so you can refer to a partition (or a group of them, with RAIDs, JBODs and whatnot) as a volume.
        volumes are logical, partitions are physical. but this explanation doesn't help people who don't know what that means

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      volume is how loud the drive gets
      partition is slicing up part of the drive like bread. maybe on one slice you put grape jelly, another strawberry jam. likewise, you can create multiple partitions on a drive for C: D: E: etc to store different files in different places (like if you reinstall windows frequently, you just store everything important in D: so you can erase C: as much as you want)

      So does the volume or the partition have the assigned letter?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        the partition gets the letter
        volume can be determined with a decibel meter

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A partition is visible to every OS, lets assume youre using MBR for simplicity. The MBR on the start of the drive lists the partitions, that list also shows the file systems for the respective partition (msdos, ext4, bsd etc).
    Volumes are handled within the OS accessing the partition. Think of the partiion as the layout of the physical hard drive, volumes are used for management within the OS.
    Also, disbelieve everything ive said. Im drunk.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Partitions are how you logically divide up a disk.
      Volumes are also how you logically divide up a disk, but different.
      It's like the x coordinate and the y coordinate on a graph. There's no difference between them that you can get at by describing each of them in isolation; their isolated descriptions are identical: the x coordinate is a number that affects where a point is, and the y coordinate is also a number that affects where a point is. And yet, they are two different things, and the ONLY way they're different is that one thing can have two different values between them.
      You can sometimes have multiple partitions to a volume. You can also sometimes have multiple volumes to a partition.
      It's literally just, two spatial layouts, possibly distinct in details, imposed as abstractions over the same disk at the same time.

      This is a good point, a volume can span multiple partitions, managed by the OS that has it set. IF im not completely mistaken. Combine these ideas and consider RAID.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    volume is how loud the drive gets
    partition is slicing up part of the drive like bread. maybe on one slice you put grape jelly, another strawberry jam. likewise, you can create multiple partitions on a drive for C: D: E: etc to store different files in different places (like if you reinstall windows frequently, you just store everything important in D: so you can erase C: as much as you want)

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >I needed to encrypt my shit incase I die
    You're retarded son. You don't need to encrypt shit. Being retarded is like a free pass for doing bad stuff

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Partitions are how you logically divide up a disk.
    Volumes are also how you logically divide up a disk, but different.
    It's like the x coordinate and the y coordinate on a graph. There's no difference between them that you can get at by describing each of them in isolation; their isolated descriptions are identical: the x coordinate is a number that affects where a point is, and the y coordinate is also a number that affects where a point is. And yet, they are two different things, and the ONLY way they're different is that one thing can have two different values between them.
    You can sometimes have multiple partitions to a volume. You can also sometimes have multiple volumes to a partition.
    It's literally just, two spatial layouts, possibly distinct in details, imposed as abstractions over the same disk at the same time.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Stop thinking in analogies, and start thinking in first principles.
    >The only way to access a spinning disc hard drive at the smallest possible level is one bit at a time. Assuming that ALL data is read the same way, we have to divide the entire surface of a magnetic spinning disc hard drive into segments. They MUST be a factor of 2 because we're working with binary (a single bit on a spinning disc hard drive is can ONLY be a positive or negatively magnetized region on disc - a 1 or a 0). All hard drives use standard 512 byte chunks (like Minecraft, for all you zoomzooms out there 😉 ) called sectors. We write to the disc one sector at a time, and within that sector, bit by bit, by magnetizing the segments and we detect magnetic fluxes as a change from a zero to a one and vice versa. Cool. Now what?
    >Well, you have a way to write to the disc, but reading is useless - the bits themselves don't mean anything unless you only care about 0's and 1's. It's also a pain in the dick to move something because we're writing raw data off the head and onto the disc platter without awareness to what magnetic field was in place before we remagnetized the bits on the disc. This can cause data loss and other bad shit. We can give it structure by giving it a filesystem. A filesystem organizes the 1's and 0's in a standardized way to where patterns read in sequence can be recognized as abstract objects (eg if a read 00110101 four times in that exact order, the next 50MiB I read is to be interpreted as a file, and some additional 0's and 1's tell you - or more specifically - your OS, that its an image of your drunk aunt fucking your friend that you want to use as black mail.) So, you have a hard drive, and it has structured data on it. Cool, now what?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Well, you'd like to be able to separate that scandalous picture of your whore of an aunt from your actual work on your drive without having to think of her, or your friend that you thought you could trust. You can do that by creating a new filesystem. Just like before, we can make patterns on the disc to separate file systems just like we can separate files. This works well enough, but there's a small problem - I also boot into a different operating system from time to time that writes different bit patterns for filesystems than my other operating system, and they don't really play well and recognize each others patterns. You also are probably going to need a way to separate them in a more clear cut way, since taking high quality pics of your slutty aunt through her window using your new iPhone 14 Pro Max™ is going to take up a lot of space, and if you don't delineate hard boundaries between your data, the filesystems might overwrite each other across separate filesystems, and we're back to square one, before we had file systems. Now what?
      >Partitions! We can segment parts of the hard drive into their own separate logical block devices (eg a device that has sectors) by making a table at the start of the drive that practically every OS can read that says where a partition begins and where it ends, using sector offsets (eg from sector 10, to sector 100,000, use this as if it were its own separate hard drive). This is great. Now you can use up that terabyte of space for your auntie while you can do your other stuff without fear of your computer overwriting your files, regardless of how many videos of your aunt you take while she's in the shower. You're running out of space, though, and you're thinking of upgrading to an SSD. There's just one problem: an SSD is NOT a spinning hard drive. Now what?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >You fucking lie! SSDs on SATA interfaces pretend to be spinning hard drives, even though they're accessed completely different from how a spinning disk hard drive is mechanically accessed. They implement an interface for SATA busses to talk to them as if they spun. Now you have even MORE space for your growing auntie porn collection. There's another problem though - you still want to use your old hard drive and your new SSD, but you want them to use the same partitions across drives? You might also want to combine partitions, or resize them depending on your data needs. Now what?
        >Logical volume management. Logical volumes provide a facility to create logical groups of data across block devices and have your OS recognize them, again, as a single block device. This can be useful, especially in JBOD configurations (Just A Bunch of Disk) where you want to have shit tons of data across lots of hard drives but you're too retarded to set up RAID. You can do the same for your two drives now - in your OS (you ARE using Linux, right anon?), you can set up LVM and chain your partitions together. I won't go into the details of this, because it doesn't matter. What does matter is now you have two hard drives that function as one hard drives that stores A LOT of auntie spankbait. The final problem is that you don't want anyone to see your aunt exposed before you finally commit to your master plan of black mailing her into sucking YOUR micropenis instead of your friend. But how do you encrypt it, especially if the volume is separated across multiple physical drives?
        You use LUKS, dumbass: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_Unified_Key_Setup

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Well, you'd like to be able to separate that scandalous picture of your whore of an aunt from your actual work on your drive without having to think of her, or your friend that you thought you could trust. You can do that by creating a new filesystem. Just like before, we can make patterns on the disc to separate file systems just like we can separate files. This works well enough, but there's a small problem - I also boot into a different operating system from time to time that writes different bit patterns for filesystems than my other operating system, and they don't really play well and recognize each others patterns. You also are probably going to need a way to separate them in a more clear cut way, since taking high quality pics of your slutty aunt through her window using your new iPhone 14 Pro Max™ is going to take up a lot of space, and if you don't delineate hard boundaries between your data, the filesystems might overwrite each other across separate filesystems, and we're back to square one, before we had file systems. Now what?
      >Partitions! We can segment parts of the hard drive into their own separate logical block devices (eg a device that has sectors) by making a table at the start of the drive that practically every OS can read that says where a partition begins and where it ends, using sector offsets (eg from sector 10, to sector 100,000, use this as if it were its own separate hard drive). This is great. Now you can use up that terabyte of space for your auntie while you can do your other stuff without fear of your computer overwriting your files, regardless of how many videos of your aunt you take while she's in the shower. You're running out of space, though, and you're thinking of upgrading to an SSD. There's just one problem: an SSD is NOT a spinning hard drive. Now what?

      >You fucking lie! SSDs on SATA interfaces pretend to be spinning hard drives, even though they're accessed completely different from how a spinning disk hard drive is mechanically accessed. They implement an interface for SATA busses to talk to them as if they spun. Now you have even MORE space for your growing auntie porn collection. There's another problem though - you still want to use your old hard drive and your new SSD, but you want them to use the same partitions across drives? You might also want to combine partitions, or resize them depending on your data needs. Now what?
      >Logical volume management. Logical volumes provide a facility to create logical groups of data across block devices and have your OS recognize them, again, as a single block device. This can be useful, especially in JBOD configurations (Just A Bunch of Disk) where you want to have shit tons of data across lots of hard drives but you're too retarded to set up RAID. You can do the same for your two drives now - in your OS (you ARE using Linux, right anon?), you can set up LVM and chain your partitions together. I won't go into the details of this, because it doesn't matter. What does matter is now you have two hard drives that function as one hard drives that stores A LOT of auntie spankbait. The final problem is that you don't want anyone to see your aunt exposed before you finally commit to your master plan of black mailing her into sucking YOUR micropenis instead of your friend. But how do you encrypt it, especially if the volume is separated across multiple physical drives?
      You use LUKS, dumbass: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_Unified_Key_Setup

      The purest form of autism

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Well, you'd like to be able to separate that scandalous picture of your whore of an aunt from your actual work on your drive without having to think of her, or your friend that you thought you could trust. You can do that by creating a new filesystem. Just like before, we can make patterns on the disc to separate file systems just like we can separate files. This works well enough, but there's a small problem - I also boot into a different operating system from time to time that writes different bit patterns for filesystems than my other operating system, and they don't really play well and recognize each others patterns. You also are probably going to need a way to separate them in a more clear cut way, since taking high quality pics of your slutty aunt through her window using your new iPhone 14 Pro Max™ is going to take up a lot of space, and if you don't delineate hard boundaries between your data, the filesystems might overwrite each other across separate filesystems, and we're back to square one, before we had file systems. Now what?
      >Partitions! We can segment parts of the hard drive into their own separate logical block devices (eg a device that has sectors) by making a table at the start of the drive that practically every OS can read that says where a partition begins and where it ends, using sector offsets (eg from sector 10, to sector 100,000, use this as if it were its own separate hard drive). This is great. Now you can use up that terabyte of space for your auntie while you can do your other stuff without fear of your computer overwriting your files, regardless of how many videos of your aunt you take while she's in the shower. You're running out of space, though, and you're thinking of upgrading to an SSD. There's just one problem: an SSD is NOT a spinning hard drive. Now what?

      >You fucking lie! SSDs on SATA interfaces pretend to be spinning hard drives, even though they're accessed completely different from how a spinning disk hard drive is mechanically accessed. They implement an interface for SATA busses to talk to them as if they spun. Now you have even MORE space for your growing auntie porn collection. There's another problem though - you still want to use your old hard drive and your new SSD, but you want them to use the same partitions across drives? You might also want to combine partitions, or resize them depending on your data needs. Now what?
      >Logical volume management. Logical volumes provide a facility to create logical groups of data across block devices and have your OS recognize them, again, as a single block device. This can be useful, especially in JBOD configurations (Just A Bunch of Disk) where you want to have shit tons of data across lots of hard drives but you're too retarded to set up RAID. You can do the same for your two drives now - in your OS (you ARE using Linux, right anon?), you can set up LVM and chain your partitions together. I won't go into the details of this, because it doesn't matter. What does matter is now you have two hard drives that function as one hard drives that stores A LOT of auntie spankbait. The final problem is that you don't want anyone to see your aunt exposed before you finally commit to your master plan of black mailing her into sucking YOUR micropenis instead of your friend. But how do you encrypt it, especially if the volume is separated across multiple physical drives?
      You use LUKS, dumbass: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_Unified_Key_Setup

      holy based.
      the info is not far off either, well done

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Volumes are just partitions inside partitions and make absolutely no sense.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      volumes are not defined by blocks and are much more dynamic.

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