I work for one of the largest high-end luxury fashion houses in the world in their main office.

I work for one of the largest high-end luxury fashion houses in the world in their main office.

I’ve previously worked with/for quite literally every major ultra high-end designer that you can possibly imagine and dealing with their clientele.

Happy to share almost anything.

AMA.

65 thoughts on “I work for one of the largest high-end luxury fashion houses in the world in their main office.

    • Anonymous says:

      It depends.

      Getting into a major fashion house, especially most major European luxury brands can be extremely competitive if you’re going in from a creative standpoint. For example marketing, any form of design, visual merchandising, etc. Typically requires a heavy background in fashion. Most of my colleagues went to fashion school and have spent countless months interning and studying before they were able to land a role.

      On the other hand, the less fashion centric aspects which are well needed within any company I would say are much more open. Especially if you have transferable skills.

      Perfect example is sales. Creative types aren’t sales people, but if you are great at selling and worked for a luxury car brand for example, transferring into the fashion market should be pretty easy.

      • Anonymous says:

        https://i.imgur.com/J5c7avh.jpg

        I work for one of the largest high-end luxury fashion houses in the world in their main office.

        I’ve previously worked with/for quite literally every major ultra high-end designer that you can possibly imagine and dealing with their clientele.

        Happy to share almost anything.

        AMA.

        I work in HR (inb4 chick field) doing mostly strategic workforce planning. My goal is to get into benefits strategy and analysis
        So you’re saying these more traditional business admin/office jobs are pretty straightforward to get?
        I applied at Kering a while ago but those heckers rejected me kek

        • Anonymous says:

          >I applied at Kering a while ago but those heckers rejected me kek

          yeah i really wonder if that "creative" gays or their HR know how to run any modern /biz/ at all. or know who to hire.

      • Anonymous says:

        What do they teach in fashion school? Tailoring? Graphic design? History? What would the average curriculum look like?

        Not looking to get in. Just genuine curiosity.

    • Anonymous says:

      No, I’m one of the rare few that aren’t.

      I work closely with maybe 25 guys. I’m aware of 5, including myself that aren’t gay.

      Am I correct in thinking that major European clothing brands are increasingly cutting corners and costs on the manufacture of their products while charging the same or greater prices?

      How did you get into your role and what is your role, approximately?

      Do the people in the industry actually wear the types of clothing they’re selling?

      >1st question
      Absolutely true. I don’t think it’s necessarily something new, but many brands sell themselves on the idea of luxury European heritage and a history of manufacturing in that country, whilst at the same time today, almost exclusively making their goods in places like Turkey, China and Tunisia.

      I work with a wide variety of brands and had a phone call with a high-value customer recently. She calls me and says “okay there must be some kind of mistake here… these shoes say manufactured in China and I know for a FACT (designer name) would never EVER do that”, until I told her that in fact, yes, these are absolutely made in China as are a wide variety of other products.

      That doesn’t necessarily mean the quality is bad but there are some brands that are absolutely cutting massive corners with quality control. There’s one French brand in particular that’s very popular at the moment, their clutch bags are around 1k USD, but is quite infamous where I work for being absolute dogshit quality. Poor stitching, lettering, faulty clasps, etc are extremely common occurrences.

      >How did you get into your role.
      It’s a very long story. Experience in other sectors that gave me transferable skills and also some nepotism.

      >Do the people in the industry actually wear the types of clothing they’re selling?

      Best question you asked. Absolutely not. Most people are into fashion but more into design, making their own clothes, materials, finding niche start-ups etc. Most people I’ve met enjoy fashion as a hobby, rather than a consumerist label pursuit, if that makes sense. I don’t know anyone that wears designer labels to work, apart from the odd Tom Ford belt, Prada Bag or Chanel Purse you see once in a while.

      • Anonymous says:

        >There’s one French brand in particular that’s very popular at the moment, their clutch bags are around 1k USD, but is quite infamous where I work for being absolute dogshit quality. Poor stitching, lettering, faulty clasps, etc are extremely common occurrences.
        jacquemus? why don’t you just say what it is

        • Anonymous says:

          Yeah, it’s them. I guess it’s a known fact at this point. I don’t work for them directly but I’m very familiar with their products and manufacturing.

          what are the internal industry thoughts on high end fashion houses starting to merge and closely align to streetwear trends e.g. gucci LV (chink bait)

          I don’t know if I’m honest, all I could say in regards to that are the Chinese/Arab markets that enjoy this stuff are huge and brands want to cash in wherever possible. Countries like China where people want to flex and show off their new found wealth are growing effortlessly so it makes sense that you’d want to push that angle as much as possible.

          I think that from the perspective of an outsider though, it’s easy to think that the luxury fashion market is mostly loud, garish brand appeal, the type of stuff you see on 21 year old instagram influencers, when in reality that’s a very, very small portion of what people are actually buying in the real world.

          Has AI made it into fashion design yet?
          Which books do people read to learn how to design clothes?

          AI is definitely playing a role with quality control, marketing and customer centric aspects of the luxury market.

          For design, I doubt it. I just say that because what seems to separate luxury fashion from the rest of the market is the appeal of creative, conscious, innovative human design. Maybe I’m completely wrong, but as far as I’m aware it’s not being used in any major capacity.

      • Anonymous says:

        What’re some true luxury brands that are actually "worth" the money still in your eyes? Ie. no corner cuts, not chinkmade, no bullshit.
        Hermes?

        • Anonymous says:

          Hermes sells Styrofoam sandals for $750 and artificially limits the supply of its purses. t’s definitely not worth it, none of them are.

        • Anonymous says:

          “Worth it” is subjective.

          Depends how much money you have. Not to mention, there’s zero luxury brand out there that isn’t charging a hefty, hefty markup.

          As I mentioned in one of my previous replies, I’ll share a few brands that I personally like that actually hold some gravitas in terms of their production that I know for a fact aren’t producing their clothing in the third world.

          >Private White VC.

          Long heritage brand that dates back to WW2 making trench coats for allied troops. IIRC they have been producing their clothes in the same factory in Manchester England for over 150 years and they don’t outsource.

          >Aquascutum

          Another one that still produces in England. Some of the absolute best bang for buck clothing there is. The quality vs price is genuinely incredible.

          • Anonymous says:

            >aquascutum
            They were bought by the chinese like a decade ago and their main market is downtown shanghai.
            Are you sure?

  1. Anonymous says:

    Am I correct in thinking that major European clothing brands are increasingly cutting corners and costs on the manufacture of their products while charging the same or greater prices?

    How did you get into your role and what is your role, approximately?

    Do the people in the industry actually wear the types of clothing they’re selling?

    • Anonymous says:

      I used to work in the photography studio for a high end fashion commerce site so I handled one of everything this site stocks. It made me never want to buy any designer clothes again. The quality is generic on a significant proportion of brands in comparison to their price. On the other hand, I now know the few that are still good quality and it has driven me to find smaller designers that still produce well constructed clothes.

  2. Anonymous says:

    what are the internal industry thoughts on high end fashion houses starting to merge and closely align to streetwear trends e.g. gucci LV (chink bait)

  3. Anonymous says:

    Why do clerks of these upper class establishments end up being delusional and acting like they’re better than their customers?

    There’s always some rude snobby cunt even though they’re just a glorified cashier. I’m not here to impress you random dude who folds clothes.

    • Anonymous says:

      I hecking hate that shit too. I think it’s more the personalities of people who get into that line of work. Generally people who end up there are people who aspired to be the face of a luxury brand and take that too seriously, almost thinking THEY are the brand, when in reality they are as you said, simply a glorified cashier.

      Some of it though is that brands want to exude a level of reservedness and professionalism beyond what you would typically experience. For some people that works, for others it comes across as stuck-up and obnoxious.

      I will say though, based on my experience (not dealing with front end staff) – the funniest, warmest, kindest colleagues I’ve ever had have been in the fashion industry. It’s generally not pretentious or snobby at all whatsoever. People wear what they want, people say what they want and it’s not how you would expect in the slightest.

      Thank you for sharing your insights. I’m curious, is this a single visit, or do you browse this board more often?

      Used to come here a lot, less so recently.

  4. Anonymous says:

    Thank you for sharing your insights. I’m curious, is this a single visit, or do you browse this board more often?

    • Anonymous says:

      To keep fixed costs down and increase free clash flow and therefore the value of the company to the investors.

  5. Anonymous says:

    Maybe its not an important question but do you have a dress code in your company? Do luxury brands tend to like ppl in suits or they are more fond of ppl that try some cool patterns and cuts and show up to work in some interesting combinations? Is it dependent on your role in the company?

    • Anonymous says:

      Good question.

      Depends entirely where you work and who you work for.

      From what I’ve heard (not speaking from experience here) a lot of Italian fashion houses still have fairly strict ideals in terms of how you should be turning up to work, especially between men and women, regardless of your position. Obviously, as I said it differs from company to company, but there’s a huge expectation for example for women to wear heels and men to have collars at many companies I gather.

      At the same time, fashion is a creative pursuit and is a very youthful industry that tries to be innovative and as non-corporate, and in my experience (based on the designers that I’ve worked for) there are basically no rules in terms of how you can turn up and what you wear. It’s very, very liberal, at least at a ground level.

      Going up the chain to more senior positions to regional heads, executives and managers, I don’t think you would expect anything less than at least business professional wear, but that’s a different ballgame entirely.

      • Anonymous says:

        Speaking of Italy, it has been said often on this board that orientals from China now make up the majority of Italy’s domestic clothing manufacturing labor force. Is there any truth to those numbers? I find it hard to believe that Chinese make up even 10% of workers inside Italy.

          • Anonymous says:

            Ok so you have some sauce to back those numbers up right? I’m not talking about a couple of articles showing chinks working in Italian factories, I want real numbers showing that after hundreds of years Italians just forgot how to make clothes and shoes and needed to be replaced by the Chinese.

          • Anonymous says:

            A lot of it is produced in Balkans. For example Gucci has produced shoes in my small hometown for probably fraction of what it is retailing for. Shoes are produced and then sent to Italy where sole is added

          • Anonymous says:

            >then sent to Italy where sole is added
            Kek. And they put a ‘Made in Italy’ label on it with no reference to the balkans country?

          • Anonymous says:

            I’m not talking about Italian clothes made in the Balkans, I’m talking about Chinese making all the Italian clothes in Italy.

          • Anonymous says:

            Not OP. But ive read articles about Italian tailors and part of the problem is that the kids dont necessarily want to continue the family business, they want to go off to school and do their own thing.
            Also Italy like every other Western country has a birth rate below replacement. Which means theyve been dying off gradually for decades. So logically there would be fewer Italians in existence to do the work.

          • Anonymous says:

            I can agree with that but I can’t agree with the majority of Italian clothing manufacturing being done by foreign nationals. I would be surprised if it’s over 10%. No one ever posts real numbers to backup their claims

          • Anonymous says:

            >No one ever posts real numbers to backup their claims
            Its very difficult to quantify since most of the Chinese workers are there illegally, they come on tourist visas and just stay.
            There are certainly articles that talk about the trend.
            https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/04/16/the-chinese-workers-who-assemble-designer-bags-in-tuscany
            >By day, the 38-year-old mother of four would sew trousers at one of the nearly 5,000 workshops run by Chinese immigrants in Prato, which largely turn out cheap clothing for fast-fashion companies in Italy and across Europe.
            https://www.reuters.com/article/idUSBRE9BS04D/

          • Anonymous says:

            Hell this article from 2010 says it was already a significant trend
            https://inthesetimes.com/article/working-for-fashion-chinese-labor-in-italy

        • Anonymous says:

          OP here.

          I have no clue. Don’t be mistaken, Made in Italy is a powerful tool and brands will work as hard as they can to maintain that. Same as made in France or England. If brands have to import workers from places like China to maintain that where possible I wouldn’t be surprised.

          A lot of it is produced in Balkans. For example Gucci has produced shoes in my small hometown for probably fraction of what it is retailing for. Shoes are produced and then sent to Italy where sole is added

          This is true. There’s a lot of luxury manufacturing in Croatia now especially. Plus as an EU member state it makes importing/exporting a lot easier.

          >then sent to Italy where sole is added
          Kek. And they put a ‘Made in Italy’ label on it with no reference to the balkans country?

          This doesn’t happen.

          kering or lvmh?
          did you ever touch fabric or were just an account? (post job title)
          post fit

          >Kering or LVMH
          Neither personally. I don’t like how garish and pretentious most of their brands are. Probably Kering though. I think Gucci has really cool marketing (whilst I would never wear their clothes) as well as Balenciaga. LVMH isn’t for me at all.

          >Post fit
          Honestly, I’m not too invested in what I wear. I’m probably the least /fashion/ guy in the office.

          What are you into?

          I buy most of my clothes from places like Zara honestly. In terms of the designers I am into, I like thick wool sweaters from places like Private White and The Row. I also like the cool colours and manufacturing behind brands like Stone Island and Templa Projects.

        • Anonymous says:

          Not OP but italian.
          The chinese you’re referring to are based in Tuscany around a city called Prato, which in turn has a centuries old tradition for so called ‘stracci’ (rags) they mostly recycle wool, you can check that online.
          As an overall presence there was a boom in the 10s, they set up a lot of shops everywhere and bought many industrial warehouses up in the north, during covid most of them closed shop and went away.
          On shoemaking and leather, there used to be industrial districts in Veneto, which then closed down due to financial downturn and the fact as other anon stated, youth didn’t want to work in a factory.
          Keep also in mind that processing leather can be very polluting.
          On "made in Italy", same for swiss made in watchmaking, it’s sufficient a certain percentage of the work is done stateside to be allowed that branding.
          > is something still dine in Italy?
          Apparently we still have wool mills, clothes are still produced, either classic drops or niche/technical/luxury/expensive, definitely not cheap/fast fashion as we used in the 80s.

    • Anonymous says:

      Not him, though YSL/SLP does enforce a dress code in their offices, at least here in Italy: only black and white.
      I’ve also been inside Zegna’s headquarters in Milan and haven’t seen anything that looked like a dress code, people just wore the stuff you’d see in any other office in the same city.

  6. Anonymous says:

    Do you laugh your ass off behind the counter when middle class stupids come and buy your stuff for thousands of dollars?

    • Anonymous says:

      Middle class customer yes, because they’re the absolute worst form of customer.

      Very blue collar/working class customers I feel sorry for. Like they’re so desperate to impress people they blow 3 weeks of wages on a coat that nobody cares about really.

      • Anonymous says:

        >costumer facing job
        figured as much. stupid thread, no one cares about your experience working retail
        /thread

        • Anonymous says:

          I don’t work a customer facing job. I work in an office mostly dealing with colleagues all day. Sometimes however I need to call customers when they’ve made a complaint and it’s been escalated, or if they have an issue with an item they’ve brought and they won’t let it go.

      • Anonymous says:

        I occasionally go into higher end stores with little intent of buying anything, mostly just to look at interesting stuff and once in a while I’ll buy something I really like. Do you think employees can tell? Wondering if they get annoyed or feel like I’m wasting their time or something.

  7. Anonymous says:

    Thoughts on Burberry? Would I be scammed if I bought their menswear? I *really* like their designs and it seems high quality

  8. Anonymous says:

    >I’ve previously worked with/for quite literally every major ultra high-end designer that you can possibly imagine and dealing with their clientele.

    how many cocks do you have to suck to get free clothes and 5XXXX figure salary per mth?
    do you get sponsorship from vapes or bigTobacco?

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