66 thoughts on “I HATE POLYESTER. I HATE POLYESTER. I HATE POLYESTER. I HATE POLYESTER

    • Anonymous says:

      Eh, depends on how the textiles woven to be honest. I’ve given all of my big client’s a blind test to find which shirts they like the most. Almost all of them stay away from 100% cotton and 100% poly. Most find a mid range they like, commercial retailers like 60/40, workers like 50/50, and women like 20/80. Keep in mind other plastic polymers exist like spandex and nylon so if your anti-plastic try to eliminate those as well.

      […]

      > I LOVE CHEAP SHIT
      So does every retailer that isn’t luxury. If your buying cheap clothing, your going to get shit product. It’s as simple as that.
      >t. garment print shop owner

      • Anonymous says:

        You cant judge a garment just based on feeling it once, you have to actually live a day to experience the breathability, which synthetics lack. You pernicious peddler of plastic paff.

        • Anonymous says:

          Tell that to the sales team of your local supercenter. I’ve always been more than happy to provide long term wear sessions but no one ever takes my up on that offer so eventually I just stopped asking. Most stuffy sales execs just want to get the material order form over with and focus mainly on that ever elusive bottom line.

          I provide all my customers with options for organic fibers (bamboo, silk, hemp, flax) but those 20-30 cents extra which means the luxury guys want to pivot it as a feature and the retail wholesalers want it cheaper. I’d love to fight the manufacture’s on it but I have neither the time nor the hecks to give to bite the hand that feeds me.

        • Anonymous says:

          breathability is about how the textile’s woven not what chemical the fiber is made of (beyond establishing the boundaries of how it can be woven or not.)
          polyester is literally _the_ most versatile fiber on the planet you can make anything from a siezelike mesh to a thick canvas, fleece, etc out of it.
          did you wear 1 polyester shirt and think they’re all exactly the same or something?

      • Anonymous says:

        polycotton is incredibly underrated by internet techwear and hiking people. its one of the nicest things to wear when its hot out.

    • Anonymous says:

      where can I find chinos and other pants without this bullshit? I went to the local department store and 100% of pants were "stretch" or "comfort"

          • Anonymous says:

            All the wool socks I have contain plastics. What brands even make good wool socks? Darn Tough and Smart Wool are out.

            https://www.thewoolcompany.co.uk/

          • Anonymous says:

            DIY your wool socks, it’s pretty easy. Better yet if you have old grandma do it

            You might find some orthodox seamstresses who would never think of mixing yarns lest their god smite them

          • Anonymous says:

            https://darntough.com/
            https://www.injinji.com/
            smartwool is dogshit.

            All the wool socks I have contain plastics. What brands even make good wool socks? Darn Tough and Smart Wool are out.

            merino/thin wool socks like the kind you’re thinking without nylon are bad & fall apart in a month or two because wool isn’t a structurally strong fabric.
            the nylon in wool socks is a mesh skeleton that the wool is attached to in order to physically strengthen it.
            its not just being added randomly to cheapen the sock or for no good reason.
            you can make a good 100% wool sock but its going to look more like what the other anon who replied to you suggested: a thick knitted wool sock mostly suited for wearing in the winter.

            Some degree of synthetic is required for durability and shape retention in socks. And just FYI, brands lie about it all the time. From sock makers to fabric makers for menswear to “100% organic home grown” brands. Based on a sample of 10,000 garments, 41% were labeled inaccurately. So you’re almost definitely getting a healthy dose of plastic.

            https://www.fashionrevolution.org/whatsinmyclothes-the-truth-behind-the-label/

            >So you’re almost definitely getting a healthy dose of plastic.
            most merino wool on the market gets its superwash (how they make it machine washable w/o shrinking) treatment by coating it with hercosett-125 plastic resin too. there are ways to superwash merino without it naturally but its more expensive so the company will probably make a point to tell you if that’s what you’re getting. and you can sell merino without the treatment but again they’ll probably tell you.
            there’s a wool garment maker someone on /out/ turned me onto a while ago that exclusively uses non hercosett coated merino but i forgot their name/website. it might have been that other one linked above but i’m not sure.

        • Anonymous says:

          bump, recs for wool socks? even the LL Bean ones have some synthetics

          I used Darn Tough socks for work for a couple years. However, when I recently went to buy a new pair, I realized their socks were only 50-60% wool. So 40-50% plastic. I searched for a replacement and decided on REI’s lightweight merino socks, which are 80% wool. Ive only had them for a month but they are holding up well so far. And "lightweight" is relative, theyre still fairly thick and warm.
          https://www.rei.com/product/165398/rei-co-op-merino-wool-lightweight-hiking-crew-socks

          According to everyone in the business, work/hiking socks need a minimum percentage of synthetics for durability. I’m not totally convinced by this – durability is obviously a virtue, but I would sacrifice it for the benefit of a more plastic-free life. And even if you needed to buy a new pair of socks a couple times per year, the cost per wear would be quite low.

          Also, they talk about pure wool socks as if they would be so fragile they’d fall apart the second you put them on, which seems overly dramatic. I own light 100% cotton dress socks which have held up to many days of walking and cycling. And also 100% merino long johns that held up for a winter of daily manual labor.

          • Anonymous says:

            >they talk about
            >according to
            >i’m not convinced
            no i’ve actually bought and worn them
            they suck
            its not hypothetical
            also silk lining socks
            i’m an x’er that used to be the only thing they sold
            you dont want your socks blowing out on their first hike

          • Anonymous says:

            Where did you buy them?
            I’ve worn socks with synthetics that wore out quickly too, surely a lot can vary with the weave and the quality of thread.

          • Anonymous says:

            rei used to sell both in the 90s
            yeah the synthetic doesn’t guarantee its good, that’s why i said smartwool’s ass

      • Anonymous says:

        Some degree of synthetic is required for durability and shape retention in socks. And just FYI, brands lie about it all the time. From sock makers to fabric makers for menswear to “100% organic home grown” brands. Based on a sample of 10,000 garments, 41% were labeled inaccurately. So you’re almost definitely getting a healthy dose of plastic.

        https://www.fashionrevolution.org/whatsinmyclothes-the-truth-behind-the-label/

        • Anonymous says:

          >And just FYI, brands lie about it all the time. From sock makers to fabric makers for menswear to “100% organic home grown” brands. Based on a sample of 10,000 garments, 41% were labeled inaccurately. So you’re almost definitely getting a healthy dose of plastic.
          is that even legal?

          • Anonymous says:

            >is that even legal?
            No. It’s supposedly regulated by various trade commissions depending on the country of origin. But none of these organizations are going around randomly testing garments to make sure the listed composition matches what’s actually in there because there are just far too many garments being made. Honestly it’s not worth worrying about, I just have to laugh at all the spergs who think they’re wearing 100% natural fibers. Odds are they’re wearing some mislabeled polyester as we speak.

          • Anonymous says:

            I’d say just buy from brands you trust that emphasize traditional craft. A tiny old family run sweater brand out of Scotland is probably not putting polyester in their sweaters, partially because if they were they’d lose their target customers who prioritize old school craftsmanship.

    • Anonymous says:

      yes but its when it enters the food supply through fish and animals predating on fish then eventually making it up the food chain to humans. not as much from skin contact. i wouldn’t cover my ball sack in polyester though, its swampy anyway.
      there’s a xenoestrogenic assasult on young men from all fronts. the water supply ever since birth control use became widespread… it gets pissed out and goes right back into drinking water… plastic water bottles… plastic food containers… reheating food in plastic containers… frozen food… plastic food packaging… the list goes on.
      wearing polyester clothes won’t make you gay but eventually disposing of them and the fibers they may shed while wearing them (fleece etc) will turn future generations of men gay.
      also alex jones was unironically right about the frogs turning gay. frogs are used by environmentalists as early biological indicators for environmental change and pollution. its because they breathe and absorb water through their skin and mutate readily. meaning something like a polluted water supply will show up in frogs before other animals. they’re an environmental indicator. frogs when exposed to environmental estrogens and other pollutants can and do change biological sex. the frogs tried to warn us.

      • Anonymous says:

        man you wrote so much only to be stupid
        the reason frogs are changing genders is all the estrogen from birth control that 90% of the female population is pissing into the water table, it can’t be filtered with most water treatment systems

  1. Anonymous says:

    You WILL buy my polyester/triacetate blend crepe. You WILL get a soft handfeel. You WILL get a beautiful drape. And you WILL enjoy it.

    • Anonymous says:

      no. compare human hair with a cheap synthetic halloween wig. natural fibers come alive and change colors under sunlight, whereas synthetics look extremely dull.

  2. Anonymous says:

    I tossed out my entire spandex undies collection earlier in the year and replaced it with bamboo briefs because I read up that synthetic plastics like polyester on skin contact especially on your nuts kills test and acts estrogenic.

    • Anonymous says:

      >replaced it with bamboo briefs
      fren, bamboo fabric is basically plastic… do some research
      why do you think it was invented 10 years ago if bamboo has been used for millennia for thousands other purposes?

        • Anonymous says:

          >It’s literally cellulose.
          but not only
          >The solvent used for this process
          is carbon disulfide, a toxic chemical that is a known human reproductive hazard.
          >The recovery of this solvent in MOST viscose factories is around 50%.
          >Other potentially hazardous chemicals are also used.

    • Anonymous says:

      >and replaced it with bamboo briefs
      Lol, they are 100% rayon. They make rayon out of bamboo or more likely a random smattering of different wood pulps and then call it "bamboo fibers"
      I don’t mind rayon but i would hardly call it natural.

  3. Anonymous says:

    i wear polyester underwear because i need to be able to walk around for hours a day and not chafe ever, i couldnt give less of a heck if some dumbass study shows a 0.02% reduction in your nut based testosterone due to something you wear which will turn out to be fake within ten years like most science of this nature

    • Anonymous says:

      The hecking study they all talk about with polyester underwear reducing your sperm count involved wearing a tight sling that held the subjects balls tightly against their body for a month straight without washing it. The same thing would happen with 100% cotton. It’s entirely because the balls were held tightly against the body which exposes them to excessive amouts of heat. It’s completely stupid but don’t expect these people to actually have a nuanced take on the pros and cons of different materials.

  4. Anonymous says:

    I don’t even care about the whole test thing, it’s never been a problem. The problem for me has been that any amount of activity, however small, makes polyester clothing I’m wearing smell DISGUSTING, like I’ve been sweating and sleeping in it for weeks without showering. I bought some new gym shorts and wore them after showering for a light workout, only for them to smell like I’ve had them for years and have stored them in my gym bag the whole time.

    • Anonymous says:

      Same. I have negligible BO while wearing cotton or wool, even if I rewear stuff. But anything with polyester smells like something died and rotted in my armpits after a couple hours. Happens with undershirts, hoodies, jacket linings, everything, even if it doesn’t directly touch my skin. And it is a completely different smell than my regular BO. Apparently it is because a specific type of stinky bacteria propagates well in polyester.

      • Anonymous says:

        Found any solution past simply not wearing polyester? I don’t specifically like it or anything, but I don’t really care about being /fashion/ with my gym shorts and the vast majority of affordable and comfortable ones are polyester.

        • Anonymous says:

          Not really. For gym clothes I’ll either wear cotton/spandex shorts (they look pretty bad, like cutoff sweatpants) or just run with the polyester and shower and change afterwards so I’m not stinky.
          My friend swears by antimicrobial fabrics but I’ve never tried them.

  5. Anonymous says:

    This should be a general. I rare come to /fashion/ anymore but I love these threads since it’s so hard to find good brands not made from tranny fabrics these days.

  6. Anonymous says:

    Based. It’s miserable I have to wear plastic tranch coats and 20% plastic overcoats. The rest is all cotton, leather and silk.

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