How To Clean Button Downs

I wear button downs for my job daily.
If I sweat, I change daily. If it is colder and I am clean, I wear not more than 3 days.

I have not ran them through washer and dryer yet. I have been doing dry cleaners. It will get expensive obviously.
My deodorant got caked up in 2 of them, and the dry cleaners somehow made it stain THROUGH. I just took those back to them, hopefully they fix it. But would I have this issue with washer/dryer?

Do I just run them through the wash on permanent press setting, then throw in dryer until dry on delicate?

Then take out, and I have to iron, then hang?
Ironing honestly seems like the biggest b***h. I only have like 5 shirts, so to constantly keep ironing so often is a pain in the ass. Maybe any hacks? Or is it just a "be an adult" type of thing? Just get more shirts?

19 thoughts on “How To Clean Button Downs

  1. Anonymous says:

    >My deodorant got caked up in 2 of them

    use less deodorant.
    use an aluminum-free deodorant.

    >Ironing honestly seems like the biggest b***h. I only have like 5 shirts, so to constantly keep ironing so often is a pain in the ass. Maybe any hacks?
    using a garment steamer may or may not be more convenient.

    • Anonymous says:

      wear different deodorant. dont wear undershirts
      wash shirts at home, hang to dry.
      you usually wont have to iron if you hang dry, but if you do, ironing the collar amd placket takes seconds

      I wear the dr squatch deodorants, they’re natural so no aluminum but maybe I think they use beeswax so that could be why. But I literally cannot switch I’ve tried so many and these work so well for me.
      >garment steamer
      I feel like this take just as long, maybe more forgiving though? But it kills me to hold my arm up for so hecking long.
      >hang dry
      Like when completely wet? I’ve never done this before. Do I place in dryer at all? Also I don’t have a clothes line, so it’d have to be indoors. I do have metal brackets on my ceiling I can hang from, it just sucks to have the wet clothes dripping everywhere.

      But wouldn’t they be wrinkled from being pressed and tight in the washing machine?
      >ironing
      Should I put water in the iron, or just spray on the shirt? I see mixed opinions when researching. Seems like spray on the shirt is a bit better?
      And does it need to be distilled? Or can I boil water? My water is kinda hard.

      • Anonymous says:

        Have a longer rotation. I work an office shirt and have 12 shirts, half white and half light blue.
        My strong advice is to wear only once before wash.
        I shake them & hang them wet on the hangers I store them on in the drying rack, iron when slightly moist (no more than 24h drying). Iron on cotton more, steam, rarely spray (only if a crease is persistent). Cheap shirts are usually more difficult to iron. At this point it takes me under 3 minutes per shirt to iron.
        If you have hard water, I advise to use distilled, or descale the iron regularly, otherwise it will just crap sedinent onto a white shirt right when you really don’t need it. (The sediment does wash fine – don’t worry if it happens).

        • Anonymous says:

          Yeah a longer rotation would help, a bit strapped on money right this second it’s a new job so after a few weeks I can.

          Wdym by no more than 24hr drying? Or you mean you don’t iron if it’s been longer than 24 hours of hanging?

          How long does it usually take to dry when hanging without air (so indoors)?
          Because I will need them for the next day.
          I’m wondering if my best bet is just to throw them in the dryer and just iron them at this point.

          I am a bit autistic so I like my stuff looking nice and presentable and clean. But I have little ironing experience so I’m afraid to heck shit up or even just miss something or press it wrong.

          if you can get away with the level of casuality at your job, the cheapest and lowest effort way to have a clean shirt every day is to wear cotton shirts in fabric weaves that don’t get shitty when machine washed repeatedly. some fabrics like oxford cloth can actually get nicer over time if washed/dried on the right settings.

          Yeah no I’m not a fan of them for the office, but good to keep in mind

          • Anonymous says:

            I mean don’t overdry them, then the creases get that much harder to iron out. Why do you need them next day? Wash Friday evening, shake, hang on hangers, iron Saturday afternoon.
            I don’t have a dryer right now, but never used it for shirts also when I did have one. Drip dry to slightly-moist on a hanger, then iron. Best result for me, indoors, is next day ironing.
            I follow an ironing routine every time – collar, shoulders, sleeves, body following the fabric (from buttons go around to holes). Finish with the biggest part that’s would crumple while you do sleeves or something after it.

        • Anonymous says:

          That guy is right, a handsteamer is incredible. A quick steam after each day if you didn’t sweat much in it and a shirt is practically washed-fresh again. Put it on a hanger, hang the hanger off a door or something and steam it, takes two minutes per shirt or less.
          >Ironing
          If you can afford them, Eton does some really nice no-iron shirts. Wash them, put them on a hanger overnight and in the morning they’re pretty much crease-free and ready to wear. Some other brands offer this too but they’re the best in my experience.

          >I work an office shirt and have 12 shirts, half white and half light blue.
          12 shirts and you can’t stray from the most boring shirts, cmon anon

  2. Anonymous says:

    wear different deodorant. dont wear undershirts
    wash shirts at home, hang to dry.
    you usually wont have to iron if you hang dry, but if you do, ironing the collar amd placket takes seconds

  3. Anonymous says:

    if you can get away with the level of casuality at your job, the cheapest and lowest effort way to have a clean shirt every day is to wear cotton shirts in fabric weaves that don’t get shitty when machine washed repeatedly. some fabrics like oxford cloth can actually get nicer over time if washed/dried on the right settings.

      • Anonymous says:

        >you will smell
        Speak for yourself. Op has not mentioned smell in any way.
        Take a shower you unsightly pajeet abomination and wear deodorant

      • Anonymous says:

        Never had a problem with that. Undershirts are a very common and normal thing for men to wear under collared shirts, yours must be too thin if the undershirt shows through.

  4. Anonymous says:

    wash your shit bro.

    your results may vary, but this is what i do.
    i work in IS at a hospital. fairly casual environment, but i have to look decent.

    i have about 3 weeks worth of winter shirts and about a month’s worth of hot weather. and i do laundry once a week

    wash: coldest setting, maximum spin if you have a choice

    dry: lowest setting, 10 minutes; hang until dry. your shirts will be less wrinkled if you dry them briefly.

    iron: if you need to. iron on the inside so the fabric doesn’t look crushed down; iron the back of the collar. iron the sleeves without creasing

  5. Anonymous says:

    I wear a Drywear shirt under my button-downs, they have those sweat-absorbing pads under your pits to prevent any stains.
    I’ll wear a shirt once or twice between washes.

    When washing, I wash at around 40 degrees, handwash and then dry.
    After handwashing them, I use a clothes-steamer to get rid of the wrinkles (this also helps get rid of any smells if this wasn’t already resolved by washing (for example, I don’t like it when my shirts smell too much like detergent/laundry-soap, so the steamer helps with that).)

    If it’s not straight after being steamed, I iron it, but it usually only takes 4-5 minutes to iron because it’s mostly already fixed by the steamer.

    It’s very simple. you just need to learn how to iron them and then it becomes second nature.

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