How many languages should a programmer know relatively well to consider himself a real programmer?

How many languages should a programmer know relatively well to consider himself a real programmer?

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    10-15

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'd say 2:
    Python to shit out code for money
    Elixir for everything else (OOP naggers BTFO)

    The only point to learning a trash language like C++ or system language like Rust or C is if you actually need it

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Python to shit out code for money
      is learning python is the fastest way to make money i you're a noob?

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The language of deleting cookies and resetting router.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >C
    >Lisp
    >Haskell
    >Smalltalk
    >Forth
    >Prolog

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      +1 for Forth

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I give you C and Prolog

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1, a program is someone who.. well, writes programs. if you know a single programming language that you can use to write a program with that makes you a programmer (by definition)

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      what if it's just a data science language, like R?

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1, assembly

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you're on Linux it'd be pretty lame to not know at least a bit of shell/bash besides the language you program in. But maybe a wintoddler could get away with just C# maybe

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The number of languages doesn't matter, most everything in programming is just different applications of idioms - and to program effectively in any given language is to learn how to apply those idioms in that language.
    I'd argue one might not need to actually know a real language, given they understand the design patterns of programs.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Being a "real" programmer has nothing to do with knowing languages.
    Learning a new language is trivial, what you do with that knowledge is what matters.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >How many languages should a programmer know relatively well to consider himself a real programmer?
    Enough that they are all the same to you, however many that may be.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    a good programmer is a good problem solver. a guy who knows only js and can use it to efficiently solve problems and produce applications for his company is a million times better then the NEET LULZtard who takes courses on obscure useless languages and considers themselves superior, as can already be seen in this thread.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This. If you are smart and can solve problems you can just pick up languages on the fly when you need to while mastering 1-3 that you enjoy using and actually get things done.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Only 3 - Python and Bash for all scripting and hobby stuff. JS(Along with CSS and HTML) for wagieing.

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    irrelevant
    gotta be /has shipped/ squad

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How many tools should a carpenter know relatively well to consider himself a real carpenter?

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    define knowing a language.

    I've been paid to write in multitude of languages but I wouldn't say I know them

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >How many languages should a programmer know relatively well to consider himself a real programmer?
    i have both a bachelor and master's degree in computer science, and can comfortable program in more languages than most LULZ tards pretend to know, can easily learn one i've never used. i still don't consider myself to be a particularly skilled programmer. knowing
    >muh number of languages
    is not a useful or meaningful measure of competence as a programmer

  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    0
    programming isn't just language syntax

  19. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A real programmer doesn't concern himself with badges.

  20. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    3-4:
    1. a fast language: C, C++, Rust (ACK), Go
    2. a scripting language: Python, Javascript
    3. either x86-64 assembly or a functional language

    but you can totally get away with 1-2 depending on what you actually need to do

    if you learn assembly get in the habit of checking compiler outputs of your fast language to make sure its catching all the optimizations

    also C is blazingly faster than Rust

  21. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    depends. If you're a webshitter it should be easy to learn 5+ languages. If you're a C++ wizard, just knowing that, a little bit of C and maybe a shell scripting language should suffice. Not because you're better than webshitters or anything like that, simply because C++ is an absolute clusterfuck that takes at least a decade to master

  22. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    3.

    >OCaml
    >TypeScript
    >C/C++

  23. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Zero.
    Me for example, I don't know any programming language, never write a single line of code in my life, yet, I am the most well paid programmer in the company.

  24. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No programmer "knows" a whole language. You just copy shit from github and put it together to write your program, simple. It's knowing how to do that that makes you a programmer.

  25. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's better to know only one or two languages really really well than knowing how to write "hello world" in 20 languages.

    Most of the important concepts in computing are languages agnostic.

  26. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you have received a paycheck for writing code you are a real programmer.

  27. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It’s about how quickly you can pick up something new

  28. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    an assembly language
    a compiled language
    an interpreted language
    a shell language
    internet tech languages

    fill in the blanks. understand the tools, how they work, and why they were designed that way. that's it.

  29. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I know probably 20/30 languages and am a horrible programmer - I just like PLs as a field.

  30. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just have a few you know inside and out and know enough fundamentals to be able to pick up new ones relatively quickly. You'll wanna have a couple you use for writing pretty big projects (say, C, C++, Java, C#, etc.) as well as some scripting language for smaller tasks, e.g. Perl, Python, JS, etc.

    Programming language really doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things, just fundamentals. But it's still good to have at least a couple you can say you know like the back of your hand since some companies look for that. In other words specialize based on what the market wants, choosing what you want to be your shtick as a programmer is a business decision more than a technical one.

    One career strat I've done and seen others do in the past is pick some language nobody gives a shit about anymore (like Perl) and seek out jobs maintaining old codebases and/or moving them to a newer tech stack. Companies are desperate when it comes to this kinda shit and you can make good money by specializing, but know it has downsides.

    t. someone w/ actual industry experience

  31. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hairline++

  32. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1

  33. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Whatever it is needed to implement whatever there is to be done on that particular point in time

    Programming as math circlejerk is dead and its corpse is a hindrance to actual tech progress

  34. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    a real programmer doesn't need to 'learn' new languages, they can read reference docs and be relatively productive in any given language in a couple of hours. A real programmer does not think in terms of having memorized prior knowledge but in terms of envisioning future possibilities.

  35. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I agree that learning many languages is not that important. I would say you should think about what will make you more effective at your job. I think for example it does make sense to know some scripting language.

  36. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    to be a junior full stack, js(along with reactjs), python/ruby, and SQL

  37. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    One, but if you actually understand the fundamentals of programming, you can pick up any language in a matter of hours.

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