68 thoughts on “How long were into raw/selvedge denim before you grew out of it and realized it's a meme?

  1. Anonymous says:

    Not growing out of it. It is objectively superior to mass produced denim in literally every single measure. Sorry you’re poor

    • Anonymous says:

      For doing actual work obviously not, since it’s 100% cotton and the break in weakens the fibers even more. Note that crotch blowouts are basically an accepted occurrence for "denim enthusiasts". Nothing wrong if you’re into it, personally I’ve spent >$1000 total on denim in the last few years, but no reason to pretend it’s superior "in literally every single measure", especially durability/utility

      • Anonymous says:

        You know you can own selvage denim but wash it normally and not once every 9 months right

        The only reason those guys get blowouts is they never wash because they want "high contrast fades" aka no indigo loss in the water

        If you just treat them like normal garments they will last much longer than stuff that’s thin, burned, signed with a laser and treated 39 times

        • Anonymous says:

          From the people I’ve talked to who have tried raw denim and do some kind of physical activity regularly it seems like there are other factors besides not washing. Using a fabric that’s excessively heavy and less flexible for a piece of clothing that is inherently subject to a lot of stretching and flexing rather than a fabric designed to undergo such stress doesn’t seem like a great idea. Just look at the jeans people who actually do work in them are wearing. I’m not a construction worker or anything myself but I’ve had plenty of pants that lasted years with no issues, and none of them were my raw denim (which I usually washed at least once a month).
          This is besides the other issues I have, especially comfort. Like I said I’ve looked through many raw denim recommendations for athletic builds and tried several, and never found any that had a small enough waist and large enough top block to be comfortable. Meanwhile other cotton pants with the same measurements feel fine since I’m not straining against a 15oz fabric whenever I try to bend my knees.

          • Anonymous says:

            >heavy and less flexible
            because they don’t wash. there’s a million selvedge work jeans from the 60’s & 70s in the world with no crotch blowout. crotch blowout is a skinny jean millennial invention
            >usually washed once a month
            you should wash work pants after every work day
            >15oz fabric
            vintage denim was not that heavy. extra thick denim is another millennial trend

          • Anonymous says:

            Any recommendations for where to buy similar denim today? I definitely see your point; I don’t like how shit like high contrast fades and ultra slubby 20oz denim has become the default for "raw denim" either, but like I said I’m just not personally aware of brands to buy good quality jeans from that haven’t gone down that rabbit hole.

    • Anonymous says:

      >every single measure

      dumbest fad follower, it was never the best material for all activities out there, you just don’t do anything all day

  2. Anonymous says:

    it’s only a meme when you have an exorbitant number of pairs, it’s the only pants you wear, and you never clean them like a savage. they’re still going to be better than mass produced garbage.

  3. Anonymous says:

    There are tons of 501 style pairs of selvedge that are worth investing in. A pair of super slim selvedge denim is always going to look kind of gay, but a pair of straight leg 501 jeans will always look good. Selvedge denim companies just happen to make a WAY better, more perfected version of the 501 than Levi’s ever could these days

          • Anonymous says:

            If you go outside, the majority of people (including Zoomers) are wearing straight leg. I think you must actually be stupid

          • Anonymous says:

            You forgot that I said the majority of people. Again, you’re a stupid, or just really bad at laying bait

          • Anonymous says:

            Straight/regular fit jeans only look good if you have enough of a tree trunk build to fill them out. Otherwise you look like you’re wearing grandpa’s ill fitting hand me downs.

          • Anonymous says:

            true but only with modern nig cuts.
            wide-legged reproduction jeans with a higher rise where the yoke and pockets are actually on your ass and have actual shape to them look very good on skinny short guys. (see: japan)
            a cheap and accessible pair of raw jeans you can find at even walmart for 30 bucks that gets recommended all the time here which are cut this way: wrangler 13mwz cowboy cut.
            note that if you’re used to wearing moron jeans they sit at your waist not you hips so you want to size accordingly usually an inch or 2 smaller.

          • Anonymous says:

            Most people are wearing much wider cuts. Straight leg from most makers is actually much slimmer than what is fashionable right now.

  4. Anonymous says:

    i bought my first osaka 5 jeans in 2004 long before raw/selvedge became trendy. stopped wearing jeans from around 2017-2022. started wearing raws and selvedge again. this time around i really prefer 1930’s and 1920’s era cuts.

  5. Anonymous says:

    I tried really hard to get into it, but never found anything that wasn’t made for absolute skellies. I’m not fat or a bodybuilder or anything, I just did collegiate track/field and I was already too bulky for anything posted here.

    • Anonymous says:

      you’ve been looking at the wrong half of the raw denim world.
      there’s ‘modern’ cut stuff that is exactly as you describe.
      and there’s heritage/repro stuff that’s patterned off jeans from the first half of the 20th century. that’s the stuff you want to be looking at.
      sometimes companies will make both but you’re probably just looking at the wrong brands.

    • Anonymous says:

      you’ve been looking at the wrong half of the raw denim world.
      there’s ‘modern’ cut stuff that is exactly as you describe.
      and there’s heritage/repro stuff that’s patterned off jeans from the first half of the 20th century. that’s the stuff you want to be looking at.
      sometimes companies will make both but you’re probably just looking at the wrong brands.

      tcb jeans are a good introduction to heritage/repro cut shit at a good price

    • Anonymous says:

      Same. If you’re still looking, Left Field’s Atlas (picrel measurements) has the biggest thigh-to-waist ratio I’ve seen but it was still a bit uncomfortable for me unless I went oversized in the waist. Might just be my twink build though

    • Anonymous says:

      Ignore all the twinks who already replied to you. None of their recs will fit if you actually have big thighs.

      You want Sugar Cane 1947s or plain old Levi’s 501 STF. The latter aren’t selvedge but because they shrink to fit, you can size up significantly and manipulate the shrinkage to get a perfectly fitting pair of denim.

      >t. 32" waist, 25" thigh

  6. Sieg Heil says:

    Still wear but don’t cuff…. When the cad died all these high end pairs we’re going for like $50

    $20 for some Levi’s vintage label ones

    Overbought just wear them like normal jeans they look like everyone else’s but better made like everybody is wearing fakes or someshit

  7. Anonymous says:

    I confess I fell for the meme. I bought two pairs of raw selvedge jeans in recent years and they didn’t last me exceptionally long (denim.lab and Japan Blue). Crotch blowouts, damage at the knees and on the fold at the bottom of the legs, pockets tearing. To be fair, maybe I went a bit too long without washing as I now know that accumulating dust particles will speed up wear. Also the "sick fades" I got don’t excite me at all. In fact I think they make the jeans look slightly sloppy and no longer suitable for my office job.
    Anyway, enlighten me. What are some sturdy, comfortable, long-lasting pants that will continue to look good for 4+ years?

  8. Anonymous says:

    selvedge isn’t the same thing as raw denim. you should always want selvedge, it’s a way that the pant is sewn. it’s better.

      • Anonymous says:

        Doesn’t the process that create the selvedge also make for a tighter weave? Unless nowadays they can create selvedge for show without any true benefit like in the past.

        • Sieg Heil says:

          Nah plus towards the end of selvedge cad life in the mainstream bends we’re making fake self edges by just sewing shit to the seems

          • Anonymous says:

            >in the mainstream bends we’re making fake self edges by just sewing shit to the seems
            did that really happen? not doubting, it wouldn’t surprise me.
            i know a lot of selvedge was getting made on projectile looms to trick less educated consumers.

    • Anonymous says:

      thank you for proving yourself ignorant.

      not that anon
      true but realistically i’ve never seen a pair of non selvedge jeans fail at the lock-stitch.
      there’s plenty of good japanese denim and even shuttle loom denim that isn’t selvedge.
      the self edge is just the edge of the fabric the jeans are made from woven in a way so it won’t unravel. its meaning to denimbros is a general indication of high quality jeans, because it means they were made using a full piece of denim not like cheaper jeans where they’re pattened and cut out more efficiently. generally jeans that are willing to waste more material in their production aren’t lowest common denominator jeans.
      doesn’t mean all selvedge is good (plenty of it is made in projectile looms etc) and it doesn’t mean non-selvedge isn’t good.
      picrel are an example of high quality jeans i own that are not selvedge. they’re a pair of evisus i bought in 2004. despite not being selvedge they’re an example of one of the jeans that started the raw denim revival in japan in the early 2000’s which is responsible for everything we know today existing. but they’re not selvedge.
      i got like 3 pairs of n&fs that aren’t selvedge either but they’re mij and shuttle loom.
      its just a rule of thumb indicator of quality.

  9. Anonymous says:

    11 years and going strong. it’s honestly difficult to wear any other type of trousers when given the choice. crotch blowouts or not.

  10. Anonymous says:

    Pretty much all selvedge jeans are build way too long just so all the hipsters can cuff their jeans and look like a stupid. Might get a pair of Orslow though since they come in normal length.

    • Anonymous says:

      Any suggestions for jeans that are good quality that aren’t "raw denim"? I don’t care about fades, I like wearing pants that are comfortable especially with my twinkishly large ass and thighs, and durability/utility isn’t really a selling point for denim anymore now that synthetic blends exist. I’ve been through several pairs of raw denim recommended for athletic builds but the only comfortable jeans I’ve worn are still $50 fast fashion shit.

      Do you know how alterations work? Plenty of places sell pants (not just jeans) in a single inseam length because they expect you to get them hemmed yourself, which is pretty easy to do. Plenty of denim brands offer free hemming too.

      Doesn’t the process that create the selvedge also make for a tighter weave? Unless nowadays they can create selvedge for show without any true benefit like in the past.

      Not too hard to google, but denim with a selvedge is usually made on a shuttle loom, which is older and slower than a usual projectile loom, but doesn’t inherently produce better or worse fabric.

      • Anonymous says:

        They’re long so people of any height can get them and hem them to their length

        […]

        >buy expensive jeans that you also have to go get redone the moment you buy them
        weird how regular jeans have figured out the concept of various inseams while selvedge hipsters have not

        except OrSlow for some reason

        • Anonymous says:

          Lol, have you bought pants before? I’ve bought plenty of non-denim pants that only came in 36" inseams, and I also know plenty of raw denim brands that offer hemming if you ask for it. If you only buy lower end shit I get why they wouldn’t expect you to get them hemmed yourself, since spending $10 for a hem on a $30 pair of pants may seem like a lot, but at least above a certain price point it’s extremely common. Raw denim also has more shrinkage, which means you might only want to get them hemmed after you wash them, and if you’re buying nicer pants you may want to get them hemmed a specific way (regular, original, chainstitch, etc.). The only difference is whether a brand hems the pants for you, or lets you get them hemmed yourself. It’s not that hard.

        • Anonymous says:

          >>buy expensive jeans that you also have to go get redone the moment you buy them
          basically every pair of nice trousers are sold this way

        • Anonymous says:

          do you really think tiny boutique stores (the biggest importers in the united states states started their businesses in their living rooms these aren’t big companies) can afford to stock 60 different sizes of $300 jeans?
          do you really think this stuff is produced in high enough volume for that to make sense?
          if you’re walmart corporation selling $10 jeans made in mexico its a different story stocking all those sizes.

        • Anonymous says:

          hemming is trivially difficult.
          nobody wants a pair of $600 jeans in size 40 waist 28 inseam sitting on their shelf for 13 years waiting to sell.

    • Anonymous says:

      Raw denim has nothing to do with the dye, it’s about the fabric not being sanforized or any other shit like that after weaving

  11. Anonymous says:

    n&f makes a lot of their lighter weight stuff non selvedge, heres some lightweight double indigos. high quality jap denim but no selvedge.

  12. Anonymous says:

    i bought a pair maybe 11 years ago. still wear them. they’ve lasted longer than any pair of levis i’ve owned. at the end of the day they’re just a pair of jeans but i like them.

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