How do you identify good olive oil?

There are so fucking many brands, and I'm already trying to avoid getting it in plastic containers because of xenoestrogens. I don't know if Italian is inherently better. There are so many blends, and the blends tend to be less expensive so I assume they're lower quality. They had a liter of some brand that was 10% California-sourced, and the other 90% was Argentinian, Chilean, etc. The same brand had 100% Californian, 750ml, for more than the blended liter.

Cold pressed, or no? Virgin or extra virgin? What the fuck? Someone fill me in.

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Dissolve in acetone
    Collect olive crystals
    Create tincture with isopropyl

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Greek can be as good or better than italian, so I would not care for the country of origin too much.
    Blend I would simply give a hard pass.
    Cold pressed is better but not a regulated term in the US.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't think you can even get virgin olive oil at stores. Anyway the virgin/extra virgin are quality terms for I think particulates and acidity. Found a good blog post about the subject
    https://culinarylore.com/food-myths:fake-olive-oil-brands/
    Preferably you want single source extra virgin olive oils. I do know the 100% Californian label isn't single source so eh. Actually one of the greek ones linked in that article looks good but I got about a years worth of oil to go through
    >Ellora Farms, Global Gold Award Winner, Single Origin & Estate Traceable Extra Virgin Olive Oil, First-Cold Pressed, Certified PDO, Harvested in Crete, Greece, Kosher OU, 1 Lt (33.8 oz.) Tins, Pack of 2

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      >How do you identify good olive oil?
      The best olive oil is not bitter. But it's not accessible to most people since only one batch per year can be made: the one from the first press.
      Even in producing countries it's difficult to find. I buy mine directly from the coop that makes it, at the end of each year after the first harvests.
      For the next best thing, basically this:

      nunez de prado is a good cooking one. get the nice big metal tin, pour into your own oil dispenser and refill as needed
      if you really must learn the main concern is single source

      >extra virgin
      >cold pressed
      >single source

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    nunez de prado is a good cooking one. get the nice big metal tin, pour into your own oil dispenser and refill as needed
    if you really must learn the main concern is single source

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Italian olive oil, especially the exported bottles, is mixed with seed oil as it's a sector largely controlled by mafia. Buy portuguese, greek or spanish, extra virgin. I have never even seen blended olive oil, man shit is grim for non producing countries huh?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The latest bottle I bought was Colavita. Said it was Italian imported but also said it could include Greek, Spanish, or Portuguese.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just smell it, good oil has good aroma.
    Also i doubt anyone using hot pressing nowadays.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I check its virginity.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      with the exceedingly painful virginity test

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It white people like it it's shit.

    Replace u soon. 🙂

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    cold pressed, extra virgin and not blended. but they just lie or cheat to get those tags anyway so if ur not getting it directly from the source ur fucked

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There is a greek family where I am from that owns some restaurants and they sell their own label olive oil. They claim it's pure cold pressed virgin olive oil from their family farm in greece. However they charge $10 bucks a bottle, and I am left wondering if they are selling it for a really good price, or maybe there are some shenanigans going on.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A meme in many European countries, hijacked by many industrial giants. However, at least the quality is "ok" at the very worst, as it more or less respects the making process.

      Other than that, I usually go for single origin greek or spanish oil. I live in the EU so getting genuine olive oil is easy as fuck.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I go on vacation in Greece every year and buy a big barrel straight from a farm.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My parents buy cold pressed extra virgin olive oil from the cooperative where some relatives work.
    Every year we order 45 liters for us and my aunt.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Stick with olive oil from lesser known Mediterranean countries like Portugal and you’ll be fine. Spanish, Greek and Italian shit sold abroad has become much too commercialized to be any good.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Mediterranean countries like Portugal
      Every time

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      >Mediterranean countries like Portugal
      Review this map please, thanks.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        n-word, Portugal is in the Mediterranean region for it's climate and culture.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        [log in to view media]

        they don't touch

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          they still grow decent olives you autist

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          they still grow decent olives you autist

          i remember my first olive oil..

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Olive oil is like a wine. Good ones have olive variety specified on label, e.g. arbequina.

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    got this
    https://www.monini.com/en/p/monini-originale
    what am I in for?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Its good. Dont get garden gnomeed into buying "organic" or "super duper extra virgin" or w/e its called, not worth it at all.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Tap the bottom of the bottle

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [log in to view media]

    The one at costco is real in my mind and tastes great

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Try to get in contact with med people. I buy mine from the greek cleaning lady at the office

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If it comes from Spain or Tunisia, and is affordable. Fuck anyother "source", it's all either from Spain or Tunisia.

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    THE ONLY WAY YOU CAN BE 200% SURE THE OLIVE OIL IS REAL IS IF THEY PRESS IT RIGHT IN FRONT OF YOU ON THE FARM WHERE THE OLIVES GROW RIGHT IN FRONT OF THE OLIVE PRESS

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      How do you know it's real olive oil? How do you know they didn't switch out the olive oil for something else that they're legally calling "olive oil?" How do you know nobody switched the bottle with an identical copy filled with flavored industrial waste while you weren't looking? If you look closely is there very fine print after the word "olive?" I bet there is, did you look at the seal under the cap? Were there tiny imprints from someone popping the cap off and resealing it after replacing the contents? Have you ever even had real olive oil before? Would you know what it tasted like if you tried it? What if nobody has ever had real olive oil? What if it's all been switched out without anyone's knowledge, what then, are you going to pretend like you can trust any old bottle with the words "olive oil" listed as the sole ingredient? The legal entity known as "olive oil" has nothing to do with the oil produced using olives, why would you think the words produced by a corporation have anything to do with reality? Or do you trust them because you, too, are part of it? Are you one of the people who go to my local supermarket and fiddle with the olive oil bottles when nobody's looking? You really thought nobody would catch you? I've started opening all the bottles just before the store closes and smelling them, you know. You think you're very clever with all your multiple agents and body doubles going in at random times to switch the olive oil for "olive oil" and disguising yourself with platform shoes and wigs and things but I can tell by the smell what you've done. I'm leaving hidden cameras and I'm going to catch you and your "friends" red-handed. I know you're not just switching out the oil, you're putting funny things in the bottles, too. I saw a bottle last week that smelled like vinegar and had crayon shavings at the bottom. Just yesterday I saw one with an RFID tag on the label. I know what you're all up to, and my olive oil will not be touched by your

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    As far as countries of origin go
    Greek > Italian > Portuguese > Spain > Rest of Europe >>>>>>>>>>>>>> America

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    bump

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I live in California so I just buy california olive oil
    Simple as

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