How can I incorporate 18th century clothing into a /fashion/ wardrobe?

How can I incorporate 18th century clothing into a /fashion/ wardrobe?

Pic related offers a lot of custom period clothing, but I don’t want to look like a LARPer

21 thoughts on “How can I incorporate 18th century clothing into a /fashion/ wardrobe?

  1. Anonymous says:

    just go full stupid, I see a few people do it and it is very rare mind you, but I think they’re having the time of their life and respect it.

  2. Anonymous says:

    >wear a felt hat of some kind, obviously.
    probably not a tricorn though
    >use a muted colour cloak of some kind
    this can be done, a high-up woman at my work gets away with wearing woolen ponchos in a professional environment
    >homemade leather enclosed shoes/boots (chelsea style can fit into both worlds)
    >button suspenders + leather belt
    >wool pants
    this is basically me minus the cloak, I’ll probably buy a nice peacoat for winter

    • Anonymous says:

      If you push a larp far enough it becomes based.

      True, may be Theatre pussy but that’s not always a bad thing

      In the late 14th century a bunch of Italian aristocrats got their hands on classical Greek manuscripts from the collapsing Byzantine empire. They responded to the new knowledge from ancient civilization by embarking on a full-fledged ancient Greece/Rome LARP including apparel, language, and (regrettably) sexual practices. We call it the Renaissance and it was the beginning of global supremacy for Whites

    • Anonymous says:

      Just go for it, as long as you’re not in a professional setting.

      is right, there’s a skater who dresses like a leather-bondage pirate who hangs around downtown Chicago. He’s recognizable enough that I see him every few weeks, and he always seems to be talking with friends. Random people stop and stare, but largely out of awe. It’s the commitment that sells it. As Woodsworth said, "Every great and original [artist], in proportion as he is great and original, must himself create the taste by which he is to be relished."

  3. Anonymous says:

    This waistcoat/vest in this picture is a later era one, circa 1780s-1820s, but as long as you don’t go for the very long types, as in the styles made before around 1770, especially before the 1760s, you should be good to wear one with just a modern dress shirt, plain, checked, or striped. Beanies/watch caps are also an acceptably accurate-looking alternative to tricorn and bicorn hats, as well as those round crown slightly smaller cowboy-looking hats.

    • Anonymous says:

      based

      https://i.imgur.com/Vc8AGYK.jpg

      How can I incorporate 18th century clothing into a /fashion/ wardrobe?

      Pic related offers a lot of custom period clothing, but I don’t want to look like a LARPer

      I think you could incorporate some of the colors, textiles, and finer touches into more formal attire. Buttons and pins would be a good start, allowing you to add a metal or a hebrewel to your ensemble without defaulting to typical necklaces or rings. Speaking of hebrewels, a statement piece in hebrewel tones like a coat or jacket gives a more impactful impression. Textures are, imo, a big focus. Embroidery for more delicate textural changes, furs or leather for more dramatic ones.

      Don’t try too hard to be period authentic. You’ll look more like a mall vampire than a chevalier. Post fits all the same.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *