Hinduism


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I've noticed that the wiki doesn't have much on Hinduism. Are there any charts or general book recs for someone interested in dipping their toes in the tradition?

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    An Introduction to Hinduism by Gavin Flood
    Once you finish that where you want to go will be obvious but don't start with primary texts

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Only read the Bhagavad Gita As It Is translation by A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada https://www.asitis.com/

    All other scripture including the second most authoritative the Vedas is completely beneath any need for you to read them because their purpose and essence is accomplished better by reading Gita.

    Other translations of the Bhagavad Gita are corruptions and intentional misinterpretations to serve various so-called “hindu” or new ager agendas that completely ignore the central theme and speak over the original author of the Bhagavad Gita, Sri Krishna who is the Supreme Personality of the Godhead himself

    So if you want to understand “hindu” literature, first of all don’t and second step read read the Bhagavad Gita As It Is translation by A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada from the above link in the first paragraph or any other copy

    Hare Krishna

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      this anon isn't wrong, don't get filtered by the occasional 'attempts at relating to modernity" from Prabhupada, but follow his Vedic lineage argument and it's seriously so good

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Is Eknath Easwaran's translation inferior to the one you mentioned, and how so?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Not him, but no, it's probably the translation you should be reading if anything. His commentary is very good as well as far as modern commentators go.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah I head good things about his translation. Will read it instead.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Is there a download available? Don't want to read it online.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Sounds like you’re balls deep in this sect of Hinduism. Have you read The Nectar of Instruction as well? Which other books by Swami Prabhupada would you recommend and which should be avoided?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >All other scripture including the second most authoritative the Vedas is completely beneath any need for you to read them because their purpose and essence is accomplished better by reading Gita.
      The traditional Hindu viewpoint is that only the Sruti (Vedas+Upanishads) is revealed and that the Sruti supercedes in authority all later Smriti texts like the Gita and Puranas etc. The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad says in verse 3-9-26 that Brahman is to be known "only from the Upanishads". The Gaudiya Vaishnavism school which Prabhupada belongs to inverts traditional Hindu precedents by considering Smriti texts as being revealed and equal to or superceding the authority of the Sruti. The Gaudiya Vaishnavas are influenced by the Dvaita Vedanta philosopher Madhva, who is notorious for calling many texts Sruti which had never previously been regarded as such, and for also making up fake scriptural citations to support his claims, doing so both with fake citations of real texts but also references to texts which he made up whole-cloth that nobody had ever heard of before or seen (not even his own students) but which miraculously supported his ontology and that both predicted and confirmed Madhva being an avatar of Vayu

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        I am not sure this is true.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          I am

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    wew ład

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    TOES?

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Patrick Olivelle
    No thanks.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      qrd?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        He's a top Sanskrit scholar, specialising in dharma literature. His approach is the typical academic one, i.e. looking at texts in their linguistic and historical context rather than just assuming current Hindu doctrines.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >i.e. looking at texts in their linguistic and historical context
          If by "looking", you mean "making a lot of assumptions based on extrinsic Western methodologies using entirely hypothetical bases", then yes. However, he does not have philosophical nor practical knowledge, therefore his work is entirely superficial at best, which might be useful at a certain surface level ("getting the gist" of the words translated), but not much more.
          >He's a top Sanskrit scholar
          >His approach is the typical academic one,
          These two phrases are mutually exclusive, by the way.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      What's wrong.

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Brahmins bros i don't feel so good....

    The historical origins of a concept of a cycle of repeated reincarnation or Punarjanman are obscure but the idea appears in texts of both India and ancient Greece during the first millennium BC.[37][38]

    The idea of saṃsāra is hinted in the late Vedic texts such as the Rigveda, but the theory is absent.[9][39] According to Sayers, the earliest layers of the Vedic literature show ancestor worship and rites such as sraddha (offering food to the ancestors). The later Vedic texts such as the Aranyakas and the Upanisads show a different soteriology based on reincarnation, they show little concern with ancestor rites, and they begin to philosophically interpret the earlier rituals, although the idea is not fully developed yet.[23] It is in the early Upanishads where these ideas are more fully developed, but there too the discussion does not provide specific mechanistic details.[23] The detailed doctrines flower with unique characteristics, starting around the mid 1st millennium BC, in diverse traditions such as in Buddhism, Jainism and various schools of Hindu philosophy.[10]

    [40][41][42] The evidence for who influenced whom in the ancient times, is slim and speculative, and the odds are the historic development of the Saṃsāra theories likely happened in parallel with mutual influences.[43]

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Anybody but the most mentally stunted indians accept that pre-upanishadic brahmin religious was just ancestor worship and magical thinking

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      The Kalash people practice a form of primordial Hinduism apparently.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        yeah people who stick to the Vedas would be pretty kino to watch

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        They don't have the Vedas, they're probably just following an indigenous polytheism.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          —Ritual still is of IIr. type: Among the Kalash it is basically, though not always, temple-less, involving fire, sacred wood, three circumambulations, and the *hotṛ (?, N. wutō 'high priest'). Animal sacrifice, at square fire places, is very prominent; it is carried out by decapitation (as in ṚV, SCHMIDT 1973) and by offering parts of it into the fire or into holes (cf. Avest. maγa?, and perhaps even with the 'lost head of sacrifice', still seen by MORGENSTIERNE). Sacred drink (wine < *Sauma < mead), is prominent; consumption is allowed only after Indra (as Praba) has been offered to. Ritual often is a potlatch-like merit festival (KUIPER) meant to gain status and to confirm rank. There are year-end rituals (cawmōs < cāturmāsya), involving the two moieties of the gods (Devalog and others) and of society with a Mahāvrata-like carnival, and there are other seasonal festivals within the two halves of the year.

          https://fid4sa-repository.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/3370/1/KalashaReligion.pdf

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous
  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    thoughts on unabridged Mahabharata? is it worth reading? 10 volumes (6,285 pages)

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      i seriously doubt anyone here has read it

  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Himmler was so affected by the Bhagavad Gita that he considered himself the reincarnation of Arjuna and recommended the text to all of his SS men.

    Which German translation was he reading?

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