>don’t correct an enemy’s mistake


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>don’t correct an enemy’s mistake
Wow bravo Sun

  1. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    The entire Sun clan was Zhuge Liang's bitch.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Zhuge Liang
      the original animu character

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        guess what's airing this season

  2. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    I feel like this work wasn't really intend for generals and strategists and for high level beuracrats and emperors so they'dv actually listen to their general's advice

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      The portions I've read have kinda given that impression.

  3. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is this a meme book?

  4. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >don't fight if you're going to lose
    bravo sun

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      It was written nearly 3000 years ago, obviously it's going to contain shit that seems obvious now.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        This, honestly. If you read The Prince it's the same thing.
        >kill your enemies
        >don't fuck with people for no reason
        Thank you Machiavelli.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        this. How is this not obvious?

        people that go "hurr wow gr8 advice" fail to think about the fact that TAOW was written in a time period where dissecting animal guts to try and predict the future was seen by many as a legitimate tactic. We can take rudimentary stuff like "appear strong when you are weak and vice versa" for granted nowadays but that shit would have been mind blowing to read for your average peasant.

        To give you an idea of just how retarded even generals were back then, the one Japanese warlord that bothered to read TAOW ended up wiping the floor with everybody else despite having far fewer guns in his army.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          >the one Japanese warlord that bothered to read TAOW
          Which one was it? Just wandering.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            >During the Sengoku period, the Japanese daimyō Takeda Shingen is said to have become almost invincible in battle without relying on guns, because he studied The Art of War. The book also gave him the inspiration for his famous battle standard "Fūrinkazan,” meaning fast as the wind, silent as a forest, ferocious as fire and immovable as a mountain.

            • 8 months ago
              Anonymous

              >Takeda Shingen is said to have become almost invincible in battle without relying on guns
              Nobunaga's most famous victory is Nagashino where he uses arquebusiers to eviscerate the Takeda cavalry.

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                >During the Sengoku period, the Japanese daimyō Takeda Shingen is said to have become almost invincible in battle without relying on guns, because he studied The Art of War. The book also gave him the inspiration for his famous battle standard "Fūrinkazan,” meaning fast as the wind, silent as a forest, ferocious as fire and immovable as a mountain.

                >the one Japanese warlord that bothered to read TAOW
                Which one was it? Just wandering.

                >the one Japanese warlord that bothered to read TAOW ended up wiping the floor with everybody else despite having far fewer guns in his army.

                Everyone & his mum in an East Asian military setting was required to read The Art of War as it was considered a classical part of a commanders education since the Tang Dynasty. Although Japan didn't have military academies like in Imperial China or Korea, the Daimyo nonetheless aped the classical leanings of their mainland counterparts and did what they did.

                Takeda Shingen is not really that special in this regaed. What the Takeda did was just creating an entire personality about claiming to fully understand The Art of War.

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                >>Takeda Shingen
                >Nagashino
                Tell me you are retarded without saying you are retarded.

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                Where did I mention Shingen?

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        This, honestly. If you read The Prince it's the same thing.
        >kill your enemies
        >don't fuck with people for no reason
        Thank you Machiavelli.

        this. How is this not obvious?

        people that go "hurr wow gr8 advice" fail to think about the fact that TAOW was written in a time period where dissecting animal guts to try and predict the future was seen by many as a legitimate tactic. We can take rudimentary stuff like "appear strong when you are weak and vice versa" for granted nowadays but that shit would have been mind blowing to read for your average peasant.

        To give you an idea of just how retarded even generals were back then, the one Japanese warlord that bothered to read TAOW ended up wiping the floor with everybody else despite having far fewer guns in his army.

        It's not about how old it is, guys. A lot of the stuff in these types of manuals is not "secret" knowledge, it's just logical advice from somebody who is very experienced and insightful. If you are an educated person with similar experience, you could probably arrive at the same conclusions these people did. I know that when I read the Art of War there were not many surprising revelations, because I'm very educated and have been exposed to strategic decision making already, I had figured out a lot of these things for myself.

        But suppose you're not somebody given to strategic insight, you're not well-versed in military history or theory, and have no real experience having to make military decisions or administrating a large military organization. Yet despite this, you find yourself responsible for an army of thousands, if not tens of thousands, of men by accident of birth. Regardless of your inexperience and ignorance, you still have the authority to order these men to their deaths. This is who this manual is written for. It is not some kind of strategy guide for winning in real life, it's basically a manual for hereditary rulers who find themselves having to command armies without any of the requisite military experience, so that they don't cause a military disaster that kills their own men and brings ruin to their clan.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          Many generals were successful mostly by luck. As in they just happened to be at the head of an army that won in spite of their command and not because of it. Such men would get inflated egos and would not really bother to figure out why they won, and would simply attribute to divine favor or some other nonsense. Of course it's unlikely such people would read the Art of War in the first place.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      clearly useful advice, Zelensky should've read it.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      I was playing go with a whitoid and this is a lesson I genuinely had to teach.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      and yet people keep forgetting this

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Hitler didn't understand this.

  5. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >be sun tzu
    >from wu
    >central states consider wu savage barbarians
    >get retconned as quintessentially chinese by modern chinamen
    why are bugmen like this?

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Warring States fags consider their enemies as "barbarian" all the time and states at the borders "barbarian." Its just bants.

      Its inconsequential as Wu's culture was Huaxia and it started out as one of the Late Zhou Kingdom's Southern Fiefdoms.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        wu had totally different culture and customs to the chinese, short hair, tattoos, no surnames, no temple names, they were also discrimated for looking different
        it was literally bce fancy asian v jungle asain

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >>from Wu
      He worked for the king of Wu, but he was born in Qi.

  6. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone who extensively reads military history knows how often it is in war that commanders get fucked up because they failed to follow these basic ass fundamentals.

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