LULZ / Misc

does anyone know how I can fix this kayak?

My brother got it for free from his boss bc his boss dropped it off the trailer and it damaged like pic rel. He said he wanted to fix it up and was going to get a plastic welder or something but he just kind of left it. Any ideas if I can fix this if at all?

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

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    A couple more pics of the damage

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        OP's boat is not fiber glass you dingus.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Bitch it might be

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Whatever that spray or paste on fiberglass shit is
    The stuff they use to fix car body damage

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      [...]

      It needs a fiberglass patch.
      I’d fill interior with a bit of expanding foam, and trim it to act as an under surface. Then rough sand 4-6 inches from edge and apply fiberglass. Sand, bonds and paint as needed, but the patch is what keeps water out.

      Thank You!

      Can you post a pic of the undamaged keel on the other end of the boat?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Im going out on a limb here and saying thats #5 PP and you can patch it up with some plastic bumper filler. Alternatively look up a fabric store for poly propylene fabric and a heat gun. The fabric melts up to a putty you can work with when hot. I like to get the surface Im repairing nice and melty before I apply for good adhesion. Ive fixed some minor bumper shit, like broken fastener holes and lawn furniture this way since PP welding rods are a pain in the ass to obtain and pricey compared to PP fabric.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Btw you can get the black stuff off with car wax.

        Im going out on a limb here and saying thats #5 PP and you can patch it up with some plastic bumper filler. Alternatively look up a fabric store for poly propylene fabric and a heat gun. The fabric melts up to a putty you can work with when hot. I like to get the surface Im repairing nice and melty before I apply for good adhesion. Ive fixed some minor bumper shit, like broken fastener holes and lawn furniture this way since PP welding rods are a pain in the ass to obtain and pricey compared to PP fabric.

        There’s a form of patch you can make using bondo and fiberglass weave used for drywall. I don’t care for it, esp with things that need to float, but whatever floats your boat. I would under no circumstances do that patch absent fiberglass weave of some sort.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It needs a fiberglass patch.
    I’d fill interior with a bit of expanding foam, and trim it to act as an under surface. Then rough sand 4-6 inches from edge and apply fiberglass. Sand, bonds and paint as needed, but the patch is what keeps water out.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Can you post a pic of the undamaged keel on the other end of the boat?

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You will have to PLASTIC WELD IT

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Flexseal

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Kayaks are made of polyethylene. It’s extremely difficult to plastic weld, even for an experienced technician. And applying fillers to polyethylene is nearly impossible.

    Good thing we have this whole thread full of layman speculation, that helps OP a lot

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If he can find some scrap poly from an old tank or something he could use pieces of it to patch it up. I have had the best luck "welding" it with a hot screwdriver or copper spoon. Heat it in a torch and then heat your patch and parent material with the spoon and try to mix and blend it at the joint.

      That is what i would try first. Then i would sand it to smooth any nasty globs of the patch and to rough the surface up. Then i would apply a layer of windshield urethane over the patch to further seal and smooth it as well as windshield urethane inside the kayak to fully seal it up 100%

      If you do this, that windshield urethane is nasty stuff to work with. Very sticky and messy. I have found that if you spray the surface of the urethane with xylene it will allow you to tool it without it all sticking to your fingers or spatula or whatever the hell you are smoothing it with.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Some kayakers like Sikaflex but OP was too stupid to go to an actual kayak forum (/k/ is not for Serious People except the machinist threads, sometimes).

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >k

        I wish we had a kayak forum.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Good thing we have this whole thread full of layman speculation, that helps OP a lot
      >Kayaks are made of polyethylene.

      Um, Professor Dipshit?
      Hate to tell you but kayaks are made of all kinds of materials and fiberglass reinforced plastic kayaks are common as dirt, kevlar reinforcement is used too.
      They are also made of wood, plywood and variations of the original skin on frame construction using modern fabrics.
      Even in the case of all plastic kayaks they aren't all polyethylene, if you look at the hull/deck seam on that one (big fucking hint) you'll see it's made in two parts with an interlocking lip that creates a glue joint.
      Since polyethylene is notoriously averse to adhesives (which is why PE kayak hulls and decks are rotomolded in one piece and difficult to repair) that means that if it isn't fiberglass its almost certainly a thermoformed boat, which most commonly uses acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, aka ABS.

      https://lindarcorp.com/thermoformed-kayaks/

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >t. exclusively buys his kayaks from wallmart

      2 good goy points have been added to your ewallet

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If that doesn't go all the way through the boat. he could make a wooden replacement for that section of keel and bolt it on with something to spread the load on the inside. He could bed it in a ton of sealant on the outside and make sure his bolts are sealed inside and out.

    But for the cost of a shitty river kayak like that, he'd probably spend close to that amount on sealant alone.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Dropped it from the trailer and dragged it for 100 miles maybe.

    You could probably make it float again, but probably won't be a proper fix.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It looks like it's a PVC kayak. You can easily patch it with some other high density plastic that is pre-heated. Here is a video that shows how easy it is...

    I wouldn't think that fiberglass would work at all - how would it adhere to the PVC? With plastic over plastic, you get an actual weld. Watch the video, you'll see that not only is the repair easy, it's also cheap.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [log in to view media]

      >It looks like it's a PVC kayak.
      > Watch the video
      Links to video where in the first minute and a half the guy says the boat he's working on is HDPE, says to contact the manufacturer to make sure *your* boat is HDPE, shows a variety of items made of HDPE, and shows closeups (pic related) of the HDPE recycling ID mark all so viewers won't use the wrong plastic.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >if at all

    DESU, clean out hole with wire brush then maybe some solvent like tulane or acetone to clean surface then some water then when still wet Gorilla Glue. Lay in a fitted piece of wet wood to cover the hole before the GG. GG foams up and expands with water and that is how it works. Try to not get on skin as will take a week to wear off. After GG foams up and hardens, sand off excess to shape.

    Then never take that boat anywhere you aren't able to swim to shore. It looks like a nice stable but sorta slow fishing platform type boat, so that should be OK.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Isnt this literally the same as filling it with PU spray foam but more expensive

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Fill hole with whatever. Spray foam doesn't matter. Get 2 part epoxy and fiberglass cloth. Sand all around the area that needs repair with a course grit paper. Cut fiberglass into straps that will cover repair and at least 6 inches past. Lay fiberglass on said area. Coat with epoxy. Wait to set. Light sand and 2 more coats of epoxy waiting for it to set and sanding in between.

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