47 thoughts on “Does anyone here "debadge" your clothing and accessories?

  1. Anonymous says:

    If you wanna take off the embroidered branding on yuor clothes, then you can start by just using a seam ripper to tear off the stitching holding it in place. Then take a razor of sorts, go to the other side and start taking off the stitching holding it in place on the opposite side. There are vrious methods of going ab this that may be more efficient or result in a cleaner removal but this is the method I know of.

  2. Anonymous says:

    I debadge my clothes and gear, usually if it’s easy enough to remove I just go in with a seam ripper. I’ve never attempted to removed an embroidered logo like in that pic but I’d be curious to learn how. I have penguin shirt that fits me well, but I don’t particularly like the embroidered penguin design on it.

    • Anonymous says:

      That’s an embroidered patch that has been sewn onto the shirt. The actual shirt hasn’t been embroidered so it should be easier to remove than an embroidered Polo Ralph Lauren logo for example. I have to imagine that if you ripped out a Polo logo then the shirt fabric underneath would be all hecked up and ruined since it’s a dense embroidery. I think the threads used to sew the Lacoste patch on are what I circled in red in picrel so OP should start there.

      • Anonymous says:

        I’ve done it with lacoste and RL. They’re different but neither leave marks if you’re careful enough. RL is much harder to take off since it’s embroidered directly in the jes’rsey/knit like you pointed out bit you can’t tell it ever was there.

        No I’m not a mentally ill npc who has fallen for the anti logo hysteria
        It’s crazy how a tiny piece of embroidery that has never bothered anyone now makes TikTok brained npcs seethe so hard. The algorithm has literally rewired your brain

        Used to thrift shop in Paris in the 90’s. some places would remove all labels before selling them. It’s called «dégriffé» and you really had to look at the construction and feel the fabric to know what you’re dealing with.
        Frankly, it doesnt seem you care about clothes as much as you care what other people think

        • Anonymous says:

          Again why buy RL if you’re gonna go through all that work to take off the little logo? There’s cheaper polos of similar quality that don’t have a logo.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Why would you buy a Lacoste shirt and then remove the logo? Isn’t that the point of buying a Lacoste shirt?

    • Anonymous says:

      Latest trend. It’s called “stealth wealth” because it’s what’s old money people do. People who come from generational wealth who never have to work if they don’t want to, such as heirs to the great fortunes of America’s early industrialists and robber barons. Or in Europe, actual barons, dukes, duchesses etc, viscounts marquises, grand viziers, and earls. You get the idea. Anyway, the ‘old money stealth wealth’ aesthetic came about because these types like to spend their ample free time rag-picking at garage sales, thrift stores, and flea markets. When they find something they like they remove any obvious branding because it’s far too tacky and gauche for their refined sensibilities, but also because they want to appear like they don’t have 2 cents to rub together so they don’t get punked on the subway. The thing about stealth wealth old money aesthetic is that it’s easy to imitate, but nearly impossible to replicate unless you really are in line to inherit a cool $1B. Like everything though, you can’t fake the funk and most plebs who try just end up looking like desperate larpers because they don’t carry themselves with the natural style and grace of actual born & bread stealthers.

        • Anonymous says:

          It’s nonsense. What they must mean is classy people don’t wear clothes with big logo on them. The small logos are absolutely fine and by removing it you’re likely to scuff up the base material and ruining a perfectly good item.

      • Anonymous says:

        Actual wealthy people wear bespoke clothing, you silly little gay.

        Does old money still do that today?

        Don’t be silly.

        • Anonymous says:

          >erm, ahkshully, wealthy people do x
          >he posts on his pay-as-you-go phone from a trailer home in rural Mississippi

      • Anonymous says:

        dunno, it’s not about old-money, more like about having made it yourself
        met a russian oligarch, guy could have bought the city and his wallet wouldn’t notice
        he was wearing greasy shirt and sweatpants, legit hobo-tier
        his daughter had some $500k worth of rags on her
        and she’s the heiress

      • Anonymous says:

        See

        […]

        There’s little prestige in designer clothing because it’s now primarily marketed at rappers and homosexuals. Debadging has nothing to do with "stealth wealth" because these garments are still overpriced mid-range crap, for the most part. True stealth wealth comes as-is, using only the highest quality materials and the best cuts for seemingly plain items, the difference is easy to see up close and can’t be replicated with midrange branded stuff.
        It’s just an unspoken shibboleth to let others know you have money and taste. Question is, what’s next?

    • Anonymous says:

      I do something similar but it’s a bit of a shortcut. It’s called not buying Patagonia in the first place and it lets you skip a step,

  4. Anonymous says:

    No I’m not a mentally ill npc who has fallen for the anti logo hysteria
    It’s crazy how a tiny piece of embroidery that has never bothered anyone now makes TikTok brained npcs seethe so hard. The algorithm has literally rewired your brain

    • Anonymous says:

      Branding can be annoying on otherwise fine articles of clothing. It doesn’t necessarily mean anything against the brand itself, as far as they’re concerned you already paid for their product.
      I ripped out a white logo patch off the back pocket of a pair of black work pants I got recently because I just wanted them to be an inconspicuous pair of black work pants.

      • Anonymous says:

        Vastly different than removing a Lacoste or RL label, which is the entire identity of the brand that the shirt is designed to show off.

      • Anonymous says:

        Then don’t buy RL or Lacoste lmao there’s plenty of shirts that have no branding on them. Absolutely stupid buying a shirt from a brand like that and then sitting there hunched over with an exacto knife trying to take a logo off. People buy RL specifically for that little logo. What a bunch of dipshits you TikTok chuds are

        • Anonymous says:

          Yeah I refuse to believe you can remove the Ralph Lauren logo without damaging the shirt no matter what these autists say. Rich people don’t obsessly cut out threads from their shirts lmao what a bunch of larping gays

          • Anonymous says:

            It’s machine embroidered with hundreds of threads. I seriously doubt you could remove it without there being a mark or discoloration.

    • Anonymous says:

      NPC, kneejerk-contrarian take. Logos have always looked like shit and ruin the look of otherwise good fits. I’m glad anti-logo is in now so it’s easier to find good clothes without logos.

      Latest trend. It’s called “stealth wealth” because it’s what’s old money people do. People who come from generational wealth who never have to work if they don’t want to, such as heirs to the great fortunes of America’s early industrialists and robber barons. Or in Europe, actual barons, dukes, duchesses etc, viscounts marquises, grand viziers, and earls. You get the idea. Anyway, the ‘old money stealth wealth’ aesthetic came about because these types like to spend their ample free time rag-picking at garage sales, thrift stores, and flea markets. When they find something they like they remove any obvious branding because it’s far too tacky and gauche for their refined sensibilities, but also because they want to appear like they don’t have 2 cents to rub together so they don’t get punked on the subway. The thing about stealth wealth old money aesthetic is that it’s easy to imitate, but nearly impossible to replicate unless you really are in line to inherit a cool $1B. Like everything though, you can’t fake the funk and most plebs who try just end up looking like desperate larpers because they don’t carry themselves with the natural style and grace of actual born & bread stealthers.

      This is the impression TikTok will give you but the fact of the matter is that the sort of people who actually will punk you on the subway see anyone who doesn’t dress like in athleisure as being rich and/or middle class. I’ve been called a Tory for wearing brown moleskins, a white linen shirt (tucked in of course), and a thin blue wool jumper. I wasn’t even wearing a Sloane ranger esque piece like marroon trousers or a wax jacket. I was literally wearing a hecking anorak with this fit (I still have the anorak for dirty work but nowadays I mostly just wear a wool overcoat when it’s cold). This is how low the standards are nowadays.

      Tempted to make a bow tie out of some spare tweed cloth from a project. I didn’t get a tie in the past for fear of being mocked by the sort of person you describe but I’m honestly at the point where I view them as almost a separate species and care less and less about their opinion.

    • Anonymous says:

      >he unironically wants to pay out of his own pocket to advertise for corps
      if you were genuinely attractive in the very sense of the word, you would understand the desire to stay away from branded clothes

      those heckers pump out middling trash at absurd premium prices and then make money off people like me indirectly influencing the rest of you to buy what im wearing
      no thanks, all the fashion houses are a scam

  5. Anonymous says:

    I do it with most of my Carhartt clothing. Love the items themselves but the branding looks pretty tacky.

  6. Anonymous says:

    i leave embroidered logos on but i always remove those printed on type logos because they look like shit once they start flaking off anyways

  7. Anonymous says:

    Yes I have cut off the brand logo from a couple items I own. One pair of jeans I cut off their logo from the pocket and sewed on a patch I got from amazon instead. So it’s kind of a custom logo.

  8. Anonymous says:

    depends. i’ve debadged a fair few of my carhartt jackets because sometimes the logo just looks out of place and it ruins the look of the jacket. i usually save the badge though incase i sell it on or something.

  9. Anonymous says:

    I did it for my BMW, i removed the logo then i keyed it a little.
    Now people think that i’m ultra rich while pretending to be poor while pretending to be rich while pretending to be very poor. 4D chess.

  10. Anonymous says:

    seam ripper + sharp tweezers. If it’s a patch do it from the patch front to minimize damage to the clothing.

  11. Anonymous says:

    I’ve removed an embroidered logo from an old kipper tie and the monogram from a shirt pocket. hecked up the tie (poly shit, whatever) and the shirt pocket. Ended up just removing the entire thing.

    There’s this gray ocbd I somewhat like, but the American Eagle logo sucks. Can’t say that RL logos are as upsetting to me. Anyway, it’s usually solved by wearing a waistcoat. Makes me feel better about beating it up.

  12. Anonymous says:

    >Buy clothing that is more expensive than it should be because it has a recognizable logo on
    >Remove logo
    >Wear mid-tier clothing that you overpaid for
    Why not just buy actually good clothing that comes with no visible logos at all?

  13. Anonymous says:

    Why don’t you just buy clothes from brands that don’t add visible logo? I mean there’s plenty of high quality stuff without badges.

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