Do clothes look bad nowadays because theyre all cheaply made?

Do clothes look bad nowadays because they’re all cheaply made? It seems like you have to spend hundreds on something for it to look nice, whereas in the past everything, cheap and expensive, just appeared to be made with better material.

23 thoughts on “Do clothes look bad nowadays because theyre all cheaply made?

  1. Anonymous says:

    1: Construction quality has decreased because clothes are by design not made to last, you’re supposed to consume thing for one season and then consume new thing next year. If this was the model for cheap clothes it would be fine but even more prestigious labels/brands now follow the same model to maximize profits.

    As with most things,social media is partly to blame. People don’t buy one or two well made shirts, they’ll buy a dozen shitty ones that don’t hold up so they can post different looks and drive engagement. That’s why "haul" videos are popular.

    2: Outsourcing labor is another issue. People have been told it would cost a lot more to have clothing made in first world countries, this is only partly true.

    The labor cost would be higher to have clothes made in the US however the company would spend less on transport and import cost for shipping shit around the world, but they don’t tell the consumer that.

    Also, god help me for saying this, clothes made in third world countries aren’t inherently bad, they can make excellent clothes just like we can. The problem is when the company is only paying absolute shit wages and has rushed production schedules to minimize the overall amount of money they pay the workers, so you get unskilled workers making shit fast and cheap.

    If you’re into shoes, look up Grant Stone. Yes the shoes are made in China, but they’re equally as well made as Allen Edmonds and sadly close to modern Alden as well since their quality has gone downhill, and for a lower price than either.

    3: You can opt out of the cycle and buy as much second hand as possible. If you know you’re measurements and know what you want, you can easily build a great looking wardrobe from eBay and get vintage, well made items in natural fabrics and still look "trendy" because ever modern trend is pretty much a rehash of shit that already happened.

    • Anonymous says:

      social media’s blame is infinitesimally smaller than greedy bosses/CEOs/shareholders. just like literally every other problem on the globe, it started from greedy people in power saying: "wait, couldn’t we become even more rich by stealing even more from the poor?" and the answer was yes, indeed they could

      • Anonymous says:

        Consumers almost universally prefer to buy cheap disposable fast fashion garbage over quality clothing. There is plenty of reasonably affordable nice quality clothing still made today but people will pick the $18 made in india 8oz 50% plastic crewneck sweatshirt over the $65 16oz all cotton made in usa sweatshirt. Even when people buy expensive clothing it’s usually cheap basic garments made in the third world with brand logos screen printed on to them.
        If people actually demanded higher quality locally made garments they would be more available.
        You can buy 8oz made in usa all cotton T-shirts for $5-$6 each today right now and barely anyone does.

        • Anonymous says:

          social media’s blame is infinitesimally smaller than greedy bosses/CEOs/shareholders. just like literally every other problem on the globe, it started from greedy people in power saying: "wait, couldn’t we become even more rich by stealing even more from the poor?" and the answer was yes, indeed they could

          1: Construction quality has decreased because clothes are by design not made to last, you’re supposed to consume thing for one season and then consume new thing next year. If this was the model for cheap clothes it would be fine but even more prestigious labels/brands now follow the same model to maximize profits.

          As with most things,social media is partly to blame. People don’t buy one or two well made shirts, they’ll buy a dozen shitty ones that don’t hold up so they can post different looks and drive engagement. That’s why "haul" videos are popular.

          2: Outsourcing labor is another issue. People have been told it would cost a lot more to have clothing made in first world countries, this is only partly true.

          The labor cost would be higher to have clothes made in the US however the company would spend less on transport and import cost for shipping shit around the world, but they don’t tell the consumer that.

          Also, god help me for saying this, clothes made in third world countries aren’t inherently bad, they can make excellent clothes just like we can. The problem is when the company is only paying absolute shit wages and has rushed production schedules to minimize the overall amount of money they pay the workers, so you get unskilled workers making shit fast and cheap.

          If you’re into shoes, look up Grant Stone. Yes the shoes are made in China, but they’re equally as well made as Allen Edmonds and sadly close to modern Alden as well since their quality has gone downhill, and for a lower price than either.

          3: You can opt out of the cycle and buy as much second hand as possible. If you know you’re measurements and know what you want, you can easily build a great looking wardrobe from eBay and get vintage, well made items in natural fabrics and still look "trendy" because ever modern trend is pretty much a rehash of shit that already happened.

          Market researcher here. It’s a bit of both. People DO care about quality and ethical sourcing and whatnot, but ultimately price is normally the deciding factor. I once helped host a workshop for a poultry company. They’re pretty big, ship around Europe, have a solid consumer base, and all bar one person on the board was pretty passionate about making sure their chickens were as free range and happy as could be. But they were starting to get overtaken by cheaper factory farm competitors. And their main product was just raw chicken breast packs, so nothing fancy you could sell as being "special" or "quality", rather just a weekly staple, cheap n easy.
          Watching them workshop with customers and have THEM try to make the case to not cost cut for the sake of ethics while their customers all said "well, I mean, I would like to think the chickens are treated well….but I have bills" said it all.

          It’s not 1-for-1 with clothes because it’s hecking food (though you could argue it’s better to eat quality over quantity) but it tends to be the same across a lot of products in my experience. I’ll blame corpos where I can, but sometimes people prove to be mindless consumers first.

          • Anonymous says:

            right now and for the last few years between 30-40% of all international packages entering the united states come from just shein and temu. mostly women’s polyester fashion hauls full of $2 clothes.

  2. Anonymous says:

    The clothes I wore when I was a kid used to be like 3 times thicker and 5 times more durable. Even my jeans when I was around 12 were like heavy weight raw denim in comparison to what you get these days. And they were all cheap as heck even back then and pure cotton. No polyester plastic blended bullshit.

  3. Anonymous says:

    That’s capitalism for you.
    Maximizing profits led to cutting corners, using polyester instead of cooton an so on. But you can still find good quality for cheap in european brands.

  4. Anonymous says:

    The quality definitely is shittier and it’s harder to find something made 100% wool or cotton than them mixed with polyester or some other shit and those 100% wool or cotton garments are viewed as some sort of luxury and are more expensive as if they were any harder to make.

  5. Anonymous says:

    The thickness of cotton garments has definitely decreased since I was a child. You have to really search for thick shit now, used to be you’d be in kids gap husky jeans and a Oshkosh hat and you were good to go.

  6. Anonymous says:

    i bet someone like you woould reaaaally prefer to wear some short shorts and shoes without socks you greasy hecking gay

  7. Anonymous says:

    >It seems like you have to spend hundreds on something for it to look nice, whereas in the past everything, cheap and expensive, just appeared to be made with better material.
    clothes used to be higher quality but also more expensive.
    open up an old sears or montgomery ward catalogue and an inflation calculator.
    poor coal miners during the great depression used to pay at minimum:
    $150-300 for a pair of jeans.
    $600 at minimum for a pair of boots.
    $80 for a work shirt
    $40 for an undershirt
    etc
    the way POVERTY STRICKEN COAL MINERS DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION dressed is legitimately too expensive for most anons on this board these days. its sad. just look at how many anons sperg about selvedge denim even though the modern day stuff is cheaper than what POOR COAL MINERS DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION used to wear. i’m not cherry picking rich people clothes. this is how POOR PEOPLE dressed a century ago.

      • Anonymous says:

        It’s totally doable if they are stables that can be mix and matched.
        But it’s also assuming that you don’t get fat every 5 or 10 years like a lot of "people".

      • Anonymous says:

        i have a massive wardrobe but i get blackpilled on fashion a lot. every 5 years or so i flip flop between /effort/ fashion sperg dressing and denim dan mode. when i’m in denim dan mode i wear like 2 pairs of jeans, 1 jacket, 1-2 sweaters, and 4 shirts for the entire year. nobody notices because the weather’s pretty different day to day and i change the shoes/accessories up. it helps that maybe once a month i change it up and dress completely differently to throw people off. like the other day i busted out the full rick $10k fit it was fun.

  8. Anonymous says:

    sorry let me correct myself POOR PEOPLE DURING A MAJOR ECONOMIC DEPRESSION dressed 50x nicer than the average jobless /fashion/ zoomer.

  9. Anonymous says:

    one of the biggest myths in my experience is this notion that made in the usa clothing is always superior in quality to clothing made in 3rd world countries. ive had 20 dollar ll bean t shirts and dress shirts last longer than my 120 dollar made and sewn in the usa dress shirts. at the end of the day, no matter where the factory is, it is essentially comprised of a bunch of brown immigrant women sitting at sewing machines, usa or otherwise.

    • Anonymous says:

      its meaningless because "made in usa" only refers to the final sewing/assembly of the garment. you can ship straight up slop textile straight from china, pay an illegal immigrant below minimum wage to sew it together, and call it "made in usa" legally.
      the brands that don’t do this and aren’t ripping you off will tell you where the cotton was grown, where it was milled into textile, and often times they’ll give you the exact names of the farms and mill. without that information (or the equivalent to it for other garments) made in usa may as well mean nothing. usa is a high tier region to grow cotton in but not even really the best in the world.
      AND ALSO
      there isn’t inherently anything good about making textile in a first world country. its like the selvedge line on jeans — a company that pays first world wages to their textile workers IS LESS LIKELY TO cut huge corners elsewhere. that’s all it means. more likely to not be shit. doesn’t mean it isn’t shit.

    • Anonymous says:

      ww1 –> ww2 meatgrinder of white death then mass immigration really did a number on the average american and european physique. europe was hit less hard by immigration, or at least less quickly than america, but it was made up for in all the weird eugenics shit that happened over the last century like scandinavians force sterilizing guys who looked too swole at the gym.

  10. Anonymous says:

    Clothes have always been expensive. They just figured out how to manufacture fashionslop at the speed of light and now $10 for a pair of pants is normal.

    • Anonymous says:

      >now $10 for a pair of pants is normal.
      And people look at you weird if you say you spent $100 on one pair.

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