What was the most audacious event in history?

Home Forums History What was the most audacious event in history?

Viewing 42 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #112774
      Anonymous
      Guest

      What was the most audacious event in history?

    • #112775
      Anonymous
      Guest

      A world-changing revolution that
      – your enemies consider impossible even in theory
      – your supporters don’t believe can succeed
      – general population doesn’t know about
      – both sides of world war unite against

      • #112781
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >- general population doesn’t know about
        russian commie revolution dates back to karl marx, commies in russia didn’t pop out of nowhere the second lenin took a ticket to russia

      • #112792
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >have wallstreet on your side
        >im le revolution xD
        mouth breathers never change

        • #112793
          Anonymous
          Guest

          You can stop seething it’s been more than a hundred years ago

        • #112817
          Anonymous
          Guest

          lmao imagine being this stupid

          • #112819
            Anonymous
            Guest

            You can stop seething it’s been more than a hundred years ago

            he’s wrong but the Bolsheviks did genuinely receive German money, that anti-Bolshevik charge was actually correct
            that said the original guy is correct, even much of the Bolshevik higher ups didn’t plan on a revolution Lenin spent an entire night sperging his heart out and got everyone but Kamenev and Zinoviev to come around

            • #112896
              Anonymous
              Guest

              It wasn’t Germans.
              The bulk of their wealth came from a garden gnome named jacob schiff.

          • #112895
            Anonymous
            Guest

            They were funded by a wall street garden gnome, who hated the Tzar and wanted garden gnomes to rule Russia, you historically illiterate low IQ imbecile.

        • #112826
          Anonymous
          Guest

          What Wall Street money?

          • #112887
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Olaf Aschberg, who was personally rewarded Japan’s first recognition for a foreigner by the Emperor for financing Japan’s war against Imperial Russia, also funded the Judeo-Bolshevik insurrection. He, and his fellow bankers, later received favorable trading rates from said Judeo-Bolsheviks once the commies took over.

        • #112840
          Anonymous
          Guest

          ThIS!!!!!

          >when literally the whole world unites against the Russian workers and they still win

          >>when literally the whole world unites against the Russian workers and they still win
          Russian workers were mascaraed, lazy leeches won. That is why if it weren’t for lend lease the soviets would have not even stood a chance against Germany.

      • #112794
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >when literally the whole world unites against the Russian workers and they still win

        • #112795
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >it was all for nothing in the end
          >every inch of former Soviet land is capitalist
          >marxism as a whole is either dead or horrifyingly subverted beyond recognition
          There should be tears streaming down her face

          • #112798
            Anonymous
            Guest

            They can never untake the 70 years of workers’ liberation, the economic development created which brought the Slavs almost to parity with Western Europe for the first time in history, all the revolution exported, and all the happiness that people had for that time. It can’t untake the fear it instilled in the Western ruling class, which forced them to give the Western worker a dignified existence for most of the 20th Century. No event was of more positive significance for humanity, and we are still riding its wave. The only reason things are slowly getting crappier is because the USSR is gone, but the fact that there was even something worthwhile to lose in the first place is thanks to the Soviets.

            • #112801
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Meds.

              • #112802
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Yeah wow your 100% unsourced wkichart has me convinced scrote.

                • #112803
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  Meds.

                  • #112806
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    So you’re just not going to bother sourcing the economic data at all?

                    • #112807
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      Anon, totalitarian ideologies are bad, grow up.
                      Meds too.

                      • #112812
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Oh wow an actual scrotebrain

                        Britain’s opium wars killed more people than all of the communist governments. The Soviet Union ceased being "totalitarian" (A made up word promoted by US propagandists in WW2) after Stalin died. They accomplished massive leaps in technology, industrialization and education.

                      • #112831
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >people
                        The eternal anglo did it to their enemies by the way not their citizens you ‘actual scrotebrain’

                      • #112869
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Holy Cope batman!

                      • #112875
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >This is your brain on Tankieism

                      • #112925
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >the Soviet Union ceased being "totalitarian"
                        >They accomplished massive leaps in technology, industrialization and education
                        You could make equally accurate claims about African-Americans living during chattel slavery in the 19th century. Tells us about how Soviets "enjoyed" "lower rent" now.

                      • #112842
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        saved

                      • #112849
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        There’s a conspicuous absence in this image of race and gender equality promoted by communism.

                      • #112898
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        nice /poo/ infograph

                      • #112899
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Cope, commie loser.

                      • #112906
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >totalitarian ideologies
                        A scrotebrained Trotskyist meme.

                    • #112841
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      it’s in the graph you scrotebrain

                    • #112868
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      Lol….commies get rekt EVERY freaking TIME!
                      Why do you keep trying?

                  • #112889
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    >living past 70 is a good thing
                    its almost like you’ve never seen someone that age

              • #112866
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Still weird that without both ww2/nazism and communism Czechia would probably be a Germany tier wealthy economy

            • #112923
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >communism lifted more people out of poverty and provided a greater standard of living than….
              Communists literally can’t stop living off the coat-tails of capitalists.

          • #112884
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Marxism is alive and well in China

          • #112915
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >>every inch of former Soviet land is capitalist
            Lenin officially wanted it that way, midwit.

        • #112815
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >commie
          >anime poster
          After you have a nice day, your only legacy will be a skeleton that is unmistakeably male, chud

        • #112853
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Most of "the whole world’ were teeny tiny token forces that didn’t really want to be there after the most devastating war in history up to that point who were only doing it out of obligation to the provisional government that the Bolsheviks overthrew (not the Czarist regime)

      • #112818
        Anonymous
        Guest

        i’d like to note that the whole "us vs the world" thing is overstated and intervention against the soviets was actually surprisingly limited, with the soviets even gaining some support in the earlier years from the western powers
        though what they’ve managed to do is still very impressive, i’ve once read that when they were no longer able to transport coal and such via trains, they simply carried everything by hand and walked the distance

      • #112839
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >being supported by capitalist
        >against the odds
        lol

      • #112843
        Anonymous
        Guest

        delusional, the whole world was busy at the time, it’s not like everybody was actively trying to stop the revolution

      • #112886
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >including all that shit on the same side when almost every one of those groups was hostile to each other
        top tier cope
        Reds defeated only the tattered remnants of the Tsarist officer corps and the weaker breakaway republics. The Entente and Central Powers left of their own volition and the Finns and Poles kicked their asses

      • #112924
        Anonymous
        Guest

        After boxing rebellion and before Korea (former JP), Vietnam (former Frog) and Iraq.

    • #112776
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Why is the Rubicon always depicted as a grand wide river with blue waters in artistic depictions when irl it’s a muddy creek that’s about 10ft wide around the location Caesar probably crossed it?

      • #112777
        Anonymous
        Guest

        The real Rubicon makes for poor imagery.

      • #112778
        Anonymous
        Guest

        It looks cool, and we should depict things to be cooler than they were

        • #112779
          Anonymous
          Guest

          The real Rubicon makes for poor imagery.

          I dunno, I feel there’s more importance in something seemingly so small being such a gigantic step. It’s symbolic, y’know? It’s not about the breadth of the river or its aesthetic majesty, it’s about what it represents.

      • #112782
        Anonymous
        Guest

        artistic license capturing the emotion and historical/cultural importance of a moment rather than the exact minuet details of what took place.

      • #112790
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Why are some poor men without the sense of the poetical?

        • #112796
          Anonymous
          Guest

          they enjoy that moment when they say "ackchyually"

      • #112825
        Anonymous
        Guest

        It could have possibly been bigger back then you know.

      • #112827
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Now that was a big step i tell you

        It’s a lot worse than that. The river called Rubicon most likely isn’t the actual Rubicon that Caesar crossed. There’s always been a debate between this river and a nearby one. This one is far larger, and so Mussolini decided that it was the real Rubicon. But new documents found in the Vatican archives seem to suggest it’s actually the other one.
        Pic related is what the actual, historical Rubicon looks like, upstream and in winter, as Caesar experienced it.

        Shut the fuck up Nerds
        no one cares anyways

      • #112828
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >with blue waters when irl it’s a muddy creek
        which is why the Latin name for the river, Rubico, comes from the adjective rubeus, meaning "red." The river was so named because its waters are colored red by iron deposits in the riverbed.

        It could have possibly been bigger back then you know.

        >It could have possibly been bigger back then you know.
        it was a minor river even during Roman times ("parvi Rubiconis ad undas" as Lucan said, "to the waves of [the] tiny Rubicon"). His full text was:
        >Caesar had already overcome the freezing and huge Alps on his journey, and had formed in his mind the direction of the war to come, when he came to the waves of the small Rubicon

        The picture here is Caesar Crossing the Rubicon by Jean Fouquet (ca.1420–1481) – one of the most important painters from the period between the late Gothic and early Renaissance. He was the first French artist to travel to Italy and experience first-hand the early Italian Renaissance.

        • #112829
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >"parvi Rubiconis"

          In Latin, "parvi" is:
          >1. Small, little, puny.
          >2. Cheap, petty, trifling, ignorable, unimportant.

          Marcus Annaeus Lucanus (AD 39 to AD 65), known in English as Lucan, was one of the outstanding figures of the Imperial Latin period. One of his most famous works is De Bello Civili (On the Civil War), detailing the civil war between Julius Caesar and the Roman Senate. He was the grandson of Seneca the Elder and grew up under the tutelage of his uncle Seneca the Younger

        • #112848
          Anonymous
          Guest

          It’s always amusing to me to see how completely inaccurate medieval era depictions of ancient Rome are. They unironically thought the Romans had full body plate armor.

          • #112902
            Anonymous
            Guest

            artists would probably just want to relate the soldiers to uneducated people who only saw soldiers of the day

      • #112832
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Now that was a big step i tell you

        It’s a lot worse than that. The river called Rubicon most likely isn’t the actual Rubicon that Caesar crossed. There’s always been a debate between this river and a nearby one. This one is far larger, and so Mussolini decided that it was the real Rubicon. But new documents found in the Vatican archives seem to suggest it’s actually the other one.
        Pic related is what the actual, historical Rubicon looks like, upstream and in winter, as Caesar experienced it.

        Modern rivers are culled and controled by man you scrotebrains.

        Back in the day rivers were far wilder, wider, marshier, floodier and again, wider(the side shallow parts could extend way sideways).

        Also, even if so, you are comparing the river in modern day to what it may have been 2000 freaking years ago lol

        Contrarian fucktardos

      • #112854
        Anonymous
        Guest

        It was probably a lot wider in the past, Groundwater being pumped for irrigation has caused lots of rivers to shrink around the mediterranean.

      • #112876
        Anonymous
        Guest

        […]
        I dunno, I feel there’s more importance in something seemingly so small being such a gigantic step. It’s symbolic, y’know? It’s not about the breadth of the river or its aesthetic majesty, it’s about what it represents.

        it’s not history, it’s art, look at it with an artist’s eye

        the river ceases to merely be a river, it’s symbolic of the established world order. Making it large and like a powerful river thus depicts the world order as a strong, well-established system that cannot easily be trifled with.
        Thus, Caesar crossing the rubicon no longer represents the actual point of him violating orders and entering Italy, but symbolically shows someone who does the unthinkable (crossing a big, wide river) but has the real strength and skill to manage it. caesar crossing the rubicon is made on the level of opposing or conquering nature itself

        it’s very basic symbolism, but it’s effective

    • #112780
      Anonymous
      Guest

      imagine what Julius Chadsar said to his most loyal men before crossing the Rubicon.
      > my comrades, we are not coming back from this. we lose and they will have our heads.
      > ave Caesar!!

    • #112783
      Svetovid
      Guest

      Releasing a nasty, inhuman gas in a room full of other human beings, and then standing up and saying, "It was I, I did it"

    • #112784
      Anonymous
      Guest
      • #112799
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >come to country
        >get invited to be guests by the king
        >kidnap, ransom and then kill him
        >refuse to eleborate

        woke af

        • #112822
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Moctezuma was killed by the angry citizens of Tenochtitlan who hated the Spaniards lol

    • #112785
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Now that was a big step i tell you

      • #112788
        Anonymous
        Guest

        It’s a lot worse than that. The river called Rubicon most likely isn’t the actual Rubicon that Caesar crossed. There’s always been a debate between this river and a nearby one. This one is far larger, and so Mussolini decided that it was the real Rubicon. But new documents found in the Vatican archives seem to suggest it’s actually the other one.
        Pic related is what the actual, historical Rubicon looks like, upstream and in winter, as Caesar experienced it.

      • #112852
        Select all images with Carson
        Guest
    • #112786
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >ThE DiE HaS bEeN CAsT!
      what a freaking cunt

      • #112813
        Anonymous
        Guest

        seethe republiscrote

    • #112787
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The Roman soldier who mooned garden gnomes in Jerusalem causing a stampede which caused tens of thousandsof deaths

    • #112789
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >Caesar was explicitly ordered not to take his army across the Rubicon river, which was at that time the northern border of Italy proper (controlled directly by Rome and its allies)
      >In January 49 BC, Caesar led a single legion, Legio XIII Gemina (the 13th Twin Legion), across the river, which the Roman government considered insurrection, treason, and a declaration of war on the Roman Senate.
      >According to some authors, he is said to have uttered the phrase "alea iacta est"—the die is cast—as his army marched through the shallow river (The phrase, either in the original Latin or in translation, is used in many languages to indicate that events have passed a point of no return. The same event inspired another idiom with the same meaning, "crossing the Rubicon")
      >Roman law specified that only the elected magistrates (consuls and praetors) could hold imperium within Italy. Any magistrate who entered Italy at the head of his troops forfeited his imperium and was therefore no longer legally allowed to command troops. Exercising imperium when forbidden by the law was a capital offense. Furthermore, obeying the commands of a general who did not legally possess imperium was a capital offense. If a general entered Italy in command of an army, both the general and his soldiers became outlaws and were automatically condemned to death.
      >with this step, Caesar began the Roman Civil War (aka Caesar’s Civil War, which lasted 4 years, 2 months and 1 week and was fought in Italy, Illyria, Greece, Egypt, Africa, and Hispania)
      >It ultimately led to Caesar’s becoming dictator and the rise of the imperial era of Rome.
      >it directly lead to his assassination (44 BC), just five years after he crossed the Rubicon (49 BC). Caesar was stabbed 23 times by a group of Roman Senators defending the Roman Republic

      • #112797
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Octavius (Caesar’s grand-nephew) was named in Caesar’s will as his adopted son and heir; as a result, he inherited Caesar’s name, estate, and the loyalty of his legions.
        >Octavius would fight yet another civil war (culminating in the victory over Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC, the Final War of the Roman Republic), ultimately resulting in the fall of the Roman Republic and the establishment of the Roman Empire
        >Octavian pursued and defeated Mark Antony’s forces in Alexandria on in late 30 BC—after which Antony and Cleopatra committed suicide. Antony fell on his own sword and was taken by his soldiers back to Alexandria where he died in Cleopatra’s arms.
        >Octavian ordered Caesarion, Julius Caesar’s son by Cleopatra, killed. Caesarion was the eldest son of Cleopatra and the only known biological son of Julius Caesar. Caesarion was also the last pharaoh of ancient Egypt, reigning with his mother Cleopatra from 44 BC until her death
        >In 27 BC the Senate gave Octavian the new titles of Augustus ("the venerated" or "the illustrious one"). Augustus had all meaningful authority in Rome, reigning from 27 BC until his death in AD 14.
        >upon his death, his stepson, Tiberius Caesar Augustus, became the second Roman emperor, reigning from AD 14 to 37.
        >When Tiberius died, he was succeeded by his grand-nephew and adopted grandson Caligula (formally known as Gaius Caesar Augustus), the third Roman emperor, ruling from 37 to 41. Although Gaius was named after Gaius Julius Caesar, he acquired the nickname "Caligula"
        >In early 41, Caligula was assassinated by officers of the Praetorian Guard, senators, and courtiers. The opportunity to restore the Roman Republic was thwarted, however. and Claudius Caesar Augustus became the fourth Roman emperor, ruling from AD 41 to 54.
        >After his death at the age of 63, Nero, his grand-nephew and legally adopted step-son, succeeded him as the fifth emperor of Rome.

        • #112808
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Those are the only two people to have months named after them

          The months of the Roman Calendar
          >Jan – the Roman god Janus (one of Saturn’s moons is named Janus)
          >Feb – Februa (the festival of Rome observed annually on February 15 to purify the city)
          >March – the Roman god Mars (also the name of the planet Mars)
          >April – Aphrodite (who the planet Venus is named for) or Aprilis (derived from aperio, aperire, apertus, a verb meaning "to open (bud)," because plants begin to grow in this month
          >May – Roman goddess Maia (a star in Taurus the constellation is also named for Maia)
          >June – he Roman goddess Juno (a NASA spacecraft orbiting Jupiter is also named Juno)

          The rest of the months were simply numbered; their original names in Latin meant the fifth (Quintilis), sixth (Sextilis), seventh (September), eighth (October), ninth (November), and tenth (December) month.
          >44 BC – Quintilis was renamed July for Julius Caesar
          >8 BC – Sextilis was renamed August in honor of the first Roman emperor, Augustus.

        • #112809
          Anonymous
          Guest

          another famous Augustus was General Augusto Pinochet, the dictator who ruled Chile with supreme power from 1973 to 1990
          >General Augusto Pinochet rose from alférez (Second Lieutenant) in the infantry, to Commander-in-Chief of the Ejército de Chile (Chilean Army)

          the 1973 Chilean coup d’état
          >General Pinochet had the presidential palace, La Moneda, shelled. President Salvador Allende, the 28th president of Chile, killed himself in the palace using an AK-47, but some forensics experts said they believed he was assassinated with a small-calibre weapon prior to the AK-47. Allende’s widow and family escaped to exile in Mexico, where they remained for 17 years

          >After his rise to power, General Pinochet persecuted leftists, socialists, and political critics, resulting in the executions of from 1,200 to 3,200 people, the internment of as many as 80,000 people, and the torture of tens of thousands. The new government rounded up thousands of people and held them in the national stadium, where many were killed. This was followed by brutal repression during Pinochet’s rule, during which approximately 3,000 people were killed, while more than 1,000 are still missing.

          Relationship with the United Kingdom
          >Pinochet’s controversial relationship with Margaret Thatcher led Labour Prime Minister Tony Blair to mock Thatcher’s Conservatives as "the party of Pinochet" in 1999

          In 2004, he was brought to trial on 300 criminal charges for numerous human rights violations as well as tax evasion and embezzlement. During while the trial was ongoine, he died of a heart attack. Massive spontaneous street demonstrations broke out throughout the country upon the news of his death. Francisco Cuadrado Prats—the grandson of Carlos Prats (a former Commander-in-Chief of the Army in the Allende government who was murdered by Pinochet’s secret police)—spat on the coffin, and was quickly surrounded by supporters of Pinochet, who kicked and insulted him.

          • #112816
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >the 1973 Chilean coup d’état

            two years before that saw the 1971 Ugandan coup d’état (Uganda was British from 1894-1962)
            >president Apollo Milton Obote (2nd President of Uganda, 1966-1971) was deposed by the Ugandan military, led by general Idi Amin Dada Oumee, who rose from lieutenant to commander of the Uganda Army

            Amin’s rule (1971 to 1979) was characterised by rampant human rights abuses, including political repression, ethnic persecution and extrajudicial killings. Between 100,000 and 500,000 people were killed under his regime.

            he ultimately fled to Saudi Arabia, where the Saudi royal family allowed him sanctuary. Amin lived for a number of years on the top two floors of the Novotel Hotel on Palestine Road in Jeddah. In the final years of his life, Amin reportedly ate a fruitarian diet. His daily consumption of oranges earned him the nickname "Dr. Jaffa" among Saudi Arabians. He died at the hospital in Jeddah on 16 August 2003. He was buried in Ruwais Cemetery in Jeddah in a simple grave, without any fanfare

            United Kingdom
            >After Amin’s death, David Owen, CH, PC, revealed that during his term as the British Foreign Secretary 1977 to 1979 (Boris Johnson was the British Foreign Secretary 2016-2018), he had proposed having Amin assassinated. He has defended this, arguing: "I’m not ashamed of considering it, because his regime goes down in the scale of Pol Pot as one of the worst of all African regimes"

          • #112893
            Anonymous
            Guest

            I know a guy whose grandfather was a special forces who assaulted the presidential palace, he got a promotion for that.
            pretty cool

        • #112873
          Anonymous
          Guest

          what do you think would happen if Antony won against Octavian, what would the fate of Rome and the Mediterranean be?

      • #112903
        Anonymous
        Guest

        It is interesting that Caesar’s crossing of the Rubicon wasn’t even all that audacious, as General Sulla had just done that same thing not once, but twice right before Caesar did

        Sulla was just slightly older than Caesar:
        >Julius Caesar 100 BC-44 BC BC (age 55)
        >Lucius Cornelius Sulla 138–78 BC (age 60)

        Sulla was a gifted and innovative Roman general and achieved numerous successes in wars against different opponents, both foreign and domestic. He started and won the first civil war in Roman history, to procure for himself political control that had been awarded to Gaius Marius
        >Marius was a Roman general who held the office of consul an unprecedented seven times during his career (consul was the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic). For his victory over invading Germanic tribes in the Cimbrian War, Marius was dubbed "the third founder of Rome" (the first two being Romulus and Camillus)
        The Cimbrian War (113–101 BC) was the first time since the wars with Carthage that Italia and Rome itself had been seriously threatened.

        not sure what the beef was between Sulla and Marius, but they were the leaders of the two factions fighting for control of Rome the whole time until Sulla was the one to emerge victorious

        • #112904
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Sulla’s 1st March on Rome (Julius Caesar was age 12)
          >88 BCE: Sulla marchs on Rome with 5 legions, the 1st in the history of Rome to seize power through force. He was the first Roman General that marched on his own city in the Roman Republic’s history. Sulla marched on Rome in an unprecedented act and defeated the defending forces in battle. This was an unprecedented event, as no general before him had ever crossed the city limits, the pomerium, with his army

          then he took his legions to go fight the Greeks, and in his absence, Marius returned to Rome and re-took control of the city, declared Sulla’s reforms and laws invalid, and officially exiled him

          Then after Sulla gets done beating the Greeks, he crosses the Adriatic with his legions and lands on the southern heel of Italy and fights his way up to re-take Rome

          Sulla’s 2nd March on Rome (Julius Caesar was age 17-18)
          >In Rome, the factions allied with Marius levied and prepared armies to stop Sulla and protect the Republican government. The war lasted 83- 82 BC with the final and decisive battle right at the gate of the city wall of Rome itself (the Battle of the Colline Gate: over 50,000 combatants lost their lives). The result was Sulla stood alone as the master of Rome. Marius committed suicide. His head was cut off and displayed in Rome. Some senators who had held command under Marius were killed by Sulla and some imprisoned.

          Sulla, Dictator of Rome (Julius Caesar was age 18-21)
          >the Senate appointed Sulla dictator, with no limit set on his time in office. Sulla had total control of the city and Republic of Rome. This unusual appointment (used hitherto only in times of extreme danger to the city, such as during the War vs Carthage, and then only for 6-month periods) represented an exception to Rome’s policy of not giving total power to a single individual. Sulla can be seen as setting the precedent for Julius Caesar’s dictatorship, and for the eventual end of the Republic under Augustus

          • #112905
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Sulla steps down as Dictator and returns Rome to the Republic (when Julius Caesar was age 21)
            >Sulla, true to his traditionalist sentiments, resigned his dictatorship in early 79, disbanded his legions, and re-established normal consular government. He dismissed his lictores and walked unguarded in the Forum. Julius Caesar later mocked Sulla for resigning the dictatorship.[73]
            >As promised, when his tasks were complete, Sulla returned his powers and withdrew to his country villa with his family. Plutarch states in his Life of Sulla that he retired to a life spent in luxuries, and he "consorted with actresses, harpists, and theatrical people, drinking with them on couches all day long." Sulla remained out of the day-to-day political activities in Rome, intervening only a few times when his policies were involved.
            >His public funeral in Rome (in the Forum, in the presence of the whole city) was on a scale unmatched until that of Augustus in AD 14. Sulla’s body was brought into the city on a golden bier, escorted by his veteran soldiers, and funeral orations were delivered by eminent Romans

            Sulla is seen as having set the precedent for Caesar’s march on Rome and dictatorship. Cicero comments that Pompey once said, "If Sulla could, why can’t I?" Sulla’s example proved that it could be done, therefore inspiring others to attempt it; in this respect, he has been seen as a step in the Republic’s fall.

          • #112907
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >then he took his legions to go fight the Greeks

            this was the First Mithridatic War.(89–85 BC), a war challenging the Roman Republic’s expanding empire and rule over the Greek world. In this conflict, the Kingdom of Pontus and many Greek cities rebelling against Roman rule were led by Mithridates the Great, one of the Roman Republic’s most formidable and determined opponents. He was an effective, ambitious and ruthless ruler

            the city-state of Athens was one of the ones in rebellion against their Roman overlords, so Sulla and his legions sieged Athens for five months, then, on the verge of being sacked, the Athenians sent a delegation to negotiate with Sulla. Instead of serious negotiations they expounded on the Glory of their city. Sulla sent them away saying: “I was sent to Athens, not to take lessons, but to reduce rebels to obedience.”
            Then a midnight sack of Athens began. Blood was said to have literally flowed in the streets. Before leaving Athens, Sulla burned the port to the ground.
            The siege of Athens was a long and brutal campaign, Sulla’s rough battle hardened legions, veterans of the Social War thoroughly devastated the city. Athens had chosen the wrong side in this struggle, portrayed as a war of Greek freedom against Roman domination.
            It was punished severely, a show of vengeance that ensured Greece would remain docile

        • #112909
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Sulla’s 1st March on Rome (Julius Caesar was age 12)
          >88 BCE: Sulla marchs on Rome with 5 legions, the 1st in the history of Rome to seize power through force. He was the first Roman General that marched on his own city in the Roman Republic’s history. Sulla marched on Rome in an unprecedented act and defeated the defending forces in battle. This was an unprecedented event, as no general before him had ever crossed the city limits, the pomerium, with his army

          then he took his legions to go fight the Greeks, and in his absence, Marius returned to Rome and re-took control of the city, declared Sulla’s reforms and laws invalid, and officially exiled him

          Then after Sulla gets done beating the Greeks, he crosses the Adriatic with his legions and lands on the southern heel of Italy and fights his way up to re-take Rome

          Sulla’s 2nd March on Rome (Julius Caesar was age 17-18)
          >In Rome, the factions allied with Marius levied and prepared armies to stop Sulla and protect the Republican government. The war lasted 83- 82 BC with the final and decisive battle right at the gate of the city wall of Rome itself (the Battle of the Colline Gate: over 50,000 combatants lost their lives). The result was Sulla stood alone as the master of Rome. Marius committed suicide. His head was cut off and displayed in Rome. Some senators who had held command under Marius were killed by Sulla and some imprisoned.

          Sulla, Dictator of Rome (Julius Caesar was age 18-21)
          >the Senate appointed Sulla dictator, with no limit set on his time in office. Sulla had total control of the city and Republic of Rome. This unusual appointment (used hitherto only in times of extreme danger to the city, such as during the War vs Carthage, and then only for 6-month periods) represented an exception to Rome’s policy of not giving total power to a single individual. Sulla can be seen as setting the precedent for Julius Caesar’s dictatorship, and for the eventual end of the Republic under Augustus

          Sulla steps down as Dictator and returns Rome to the Republic (when Julius Caesar was age 21)
          >Sulla, true to his traditionalist sentiments, resigned his dictatorship in early 79, disbanded his legions, and re-established normal consular government. He dismissed his lictores and walked unguarded in the Forum. Julius Caesar later mocked Sulla for resigning the dictatorship.[73]
          >As promised, when his tasks were complete, Sulla returned his powers and withdrew to his country villa with his family. Plutarch states in his Life of Sulla that he retired to a life spent in luxuries, and he "consorted with actresses, harpists, and theatrical people, drinking with them on couches all day long." Sulla remained out of the day-to-day political activities in Rome, intervening only a few times when his policies were involved.
          >His public funeral in Rome (in the Forum, in the presence of the whole city) was on a scale unmatched until that of Augustus in AD 14. Sulla’s body was brought into the city on a golden bier, escorted by his veteran soldiers, and funeral orations were delivered by eminent Romans

          Sulla is seen as having set the precedent for Caesar’s march on Rome and dictatorship. Cicero comments that Pompey once said, "If Sulla could, why can’t I?" Sulla’s example proved that it could be done, therefore inspiring others to attempt it; in this respect, he has been seen as a step in the Republic’s fall.

          and it’s not like Sulla wasn’t some relatively unknown figure in Western Civilization

          all of the following composed operas on Sulla ("Silla" in Italian):
          >Handel (1713)
          >Mozart (1772)
          >Bach (1776)
          >and several other famous opera composers at the time like Leonardo Vinci (1723) and Pasquale Anfossi (1774)

          the Enlightenment (c. 1601 – c. 1800)
          >public concerts became increasingly popular and helped supplement performers’ and composers’ incomes. The concerts also helped them to reach a wider audience. Handel, for example, epitomized this with his highly public musical activities in London. He gained considerable fame there with performances of his operas and oratorios. The music of Haydn and Mozart, with their Viennese Classical styles, are usually regarded as being the most in line with the Enlightenment ideals
          >German music, sponsored by the upper classes, came of age under composers Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–1791).

    • #112791
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Napoleon’s return from Elba is definetely high up in the list

      • #112810
        Anonymous
        Guest

        woke af

    • #112800
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >cesarian legionaries using lorica segmentata

    • #112804
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >LE DIE…..HAS BEEN CAST

    • #112805
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The opium wars or the USA breaking it’s neutrality during ww1 to arm warring European powers.

      I feel that if the USA didn’t get involved in that conflict the powers would had been broke & sued for peace which would have saved lives & prevent another world war.

    • #112811
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I’d say Hannibal and his elephants or the Long March

    • #112814
      Anonymous
      Guest

      the first man in space & the first man on the moon

    • #112820
      Anonymous
      Guest

      what was Hitler’s Rubicon? The invasion of Poland?

      INVASION OF POLAND, FALL 1939
      >triggering World War II. In response, Great Britain and France declared war on Germany.

      • #112821
        Anonymous
        Guest
      • #112823
        Anonymous
        Guest

        The Battle of Westerplatte was the first battle of the German invasion of Poland
        >the German battleship Schleswig-Holstein fired the first shots of World War II when she bombarded the Polish base at Danzig’s Westerplatte in the early morning hours of 1 September 1939.
        >Schleswig-Holstein fired the first salvo at at 04:48. A longer bombardment from the battleship, lasted from 07:40 to 08:55
        >The ship was used as a training vessel for the majority of the war, and was sunk by British bombers in Gotenhafen in December 1944. >Schleswig-Holstein was subsequently salvaged and then beached for use by the Soviet Navy as a target. As of 1990, the ship’s bell was on display in the Bundeswehr Military History Museum in Dresden.

        • #112824
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >Westerplatte Monument, a 25 meter (82 ft) Monument to the Battle of Westerplatte constructed between 1964–1966 and consists of 236 granite blocks transported from the quarries in Strzegom and Borów and weighing 1,150 tons.
          Each year, official state ceremonies to commemorate the outbreak of the Second World War take place at the foot of the monument and have been attended by prominent Polish and foreign dignitaries and heads of states.

          • #112867
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Why the fuck does it have a demonic face? Common Poles you killed civilian Germans en Mass. Stop supporting the garden gnomes.

    • #112830
      Anonymous
      Guest
    • #112833
      Anonymous
      Guest

      When you’re father raided you’re mom pussy. A truly fearsome and ambitious endeavour.

    • #112834
      Anonymous
      Guest

      When forces led by Tariq ibn Ziyad (طارق بن زياد) disembarked in early 711 in Gibraltar…
      >The name "Gibraltar" is the Spanish derivation of the Arabic name Jabal Ṭāriq (جبل طارق), meaning "mountain of Ṭāriq", which is named after him.
      …to begin the Muslim conquest of the Iberian Peninsula (711 to 718), the conquest that marks the westernmost expansion of Muslim rule into Europe…there is a legend that Ṭāriq ordered that the ships he arrived in be burnt, to prevent any cowardice or turning back

      • #112836
        Anonymous
        Guest

        False, muslim scrotebrain.

        Tariq was paid by CountJulian, visigothic governor of Ceuta in order to fight with one of the sides of the visigothic civil war in Spain in that time.

        That is why his small army of bereberes were allowed to enter in Spain. Once during a battle they betrayed the
        visigoths and started to kill everyone in the back as treachorous rats you are. Kind Rodrigo died because of this, so Tariq had free way to go north helped by the garden gnomes who opened the gates of the cities (undefended because of the ciVil war)

        Why muslims like to lie so much?? Is becaUse of your lack of achiements? low IQ??

        • #112838
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >Tariq ibn Ziyad fought a Visigoth army about three times bigger than his own, at the Battle of Guadalete in 712. He won a complete victory, in which the Visigoth king and much of the Visigoth nobility were slain. Tariq then proceeded to capture the Visigoth capital city of Toledo. Splitting his small army into smaller divisions, he then conducted a lightning campaign against the reeling Visigoths, and captured many of their major cities, such as Granada, Cordoba, and Guadalajara. Tariq then governed Hispania

          Legend
          >Among the legends which have accrued to the history of the battle, the most prominent is that of Count Julian, who, in revenge for the impregnation of his daughter Florinda (the later Cava Rumía or Doña Cava) by Roderic while the young woman was being raised at the palace school, supposedly lent Ṭāriq the necessary ships for launching an invasion

          • #112912
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Again lying. I have read arab and christian chronicles of the time. Just to show how you lie: Tariq NEVER governed Hispania since Hispania was never muslim (most of the territory was not conquered, just small castles and cities because they were undefended and mostly BecAUSe there was never a centralized rule of Hispania.

            And
            the legend talks about the daugther (and it is an hipotesis, not a legend) but REALitY is wha
            t I told you about Julian hiring Tariq and his muslim army to help in thevisigothic war.

            The more I know muslim and
            how you behave and thinkand manipulate the more I dislike you (me or any rational person)

            And whenever you write something put sources so we can know the name of the lier that wrote that bullshit

    • #112835
      Anonymous
      Guest

      When the king of France was battling against Spain and he fell from his hirse and 3 Spanish soldiers saw some rich dressed man without knowing he was the king of France, so he was detained and later it was known who he was. He was taken to Madrid for several months.

      BasTard napoleonic troops 400 yers later went to the little Village were Juan was born and destroyed his grave. Unmoral people were the napoleonic troops because of all the things they did.

      https://es.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_de_Urbieta

      • #112855
        Anonymous
        Guest

        As a spaniard myself, I think what Napoleon did with our kings was far more humiliating to us than what we did to Francis I of France. After all, Francis I didnt abdicate in favour of the emperor, and he even repudiated the treaty he had signos with us.
        Not anti-patriotic, just like to see things the way they are.

    • #112837
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The Battle of Empel was very audiacious since the soldiers had to cross a lake and they waited 2 days and got frozen, so they could pass all of them with their horses

    • #112844
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Imagine just the pure ego it took to kill Caesar. A man literally who wrote his own name into history, and to expect that the public, THAT CAESAR ADVOCATED FOR, to support your coup in favor of the senatorial autocracy? Imagine being so stupid you think you and your friends can just kill Caesar and return to business as usual.

      • #112846
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >kills caesar expecting to restore the republic
        >precipitates the rise of the empire
        >causes the senate to be essentially worthless parasites
        You get what you freaking deserve!

    • #112845
      Anonymous
      Guest

      […]

      its honestly comical to read about the plebs (rightfully) chimp out at Caesars death

    • #112847
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The colonies declaring independence from Great Britain.

    • #112850
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Caesar built a bridge across the Rhine, before returning and dismantling the bridge.
      >In 55 BC, Caesar repelled an incursion into Gaul by two Germanic tribes, and followed it up by building a bridge across the Rhine and making a show of force in Germanic territory, before returning and dismantling the bridge.

      Caesar crossed the English Channel
      >Late that summer, having subdued two other tribes, he crossed into Britain, claiming that the Britons had aided one of his enemies the previous year

      • #112851
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Had all the advantages over enemy
        >Audacious
        Only audacious thing he did there was crossing the channel with Roman ships.

      • #112871
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Had all the advantages over enemy
        >Audacious
        Only audacious thing he did there was crossing the channel with Roman ships.

        at first I thought the OP pic was general Varus crossing the Rhine

        general Varus (Publius Quinctilius Varus) — 46 BC – AD 9), was a contemopary of Augustus
        >Julius Caesar – 100 BC-44 BC (crossed Rubicon in 49 BC)
        >Augustus Caesar – 63 BC- AD 14

        Augustus made Varus the first officially appointed Roman governor of the newly created Roman province of Germania in 7 AD. In 9 AD, Varus and his three legions
        >Legio XVII ("Seventeenth Legion")
        >Legio XVIII ("Eighteenth Legion")
        >Legio XIX ("Nineteenth Legion")
        were defeated by German war chief Hermann (Arminius) at the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest. After their destruction, the Romans never used these legion numbers (XVII, XVIII and XIX) again.

        Hermann’s victory at Teutoburg Forest was one of the most decisive battles in history, a turning point in world history, as it caused Roman Empire’s permanently withdrawal from Germania, and prevented the Romanization of Germanic peoples east of the Rhine. Rome chose no longer to rule in Germania east of the Rhine and the Romans made no further concerted efforts to conquer and permanently hold Germania beyond the Rhine

        • #112872
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >this Statue of Liberty-like monument in Germany in honor of Hermann’s victory at Teutoburg Forest is the Hermannsdenkmal (German for "Hermann’s Monument"), built in the 1800s
          >The statue faces west. This reflects the idea that Varus’ troops were coming from this direction. The statue’s left foot rests on a Roman Eagle, the standard of the Roman Legions. Next to it lies a fasces, the symbol of Roman authority and where the word "facism" comes from.
          >The statue was made from around 200 copper plates riveted together and supported by an iron frame. The copper weighs an estimated 11.8 metric tons. The pedestal is made of local sandstone. The statue is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Germany with over 530,000 visitors a year.
          >it is 115 km east of Dortmund, near Paderborn, although experts now consider it more likely that the battle took place 100 km to the north-west.

          (sidenote: General Varus was also known for how the historian Josephus chronicals the swift action of Varus against a messianic revolt in Judaea after the death of the Roman client king, Herod the Great, in 4 BC. After occupying Jerusalem, he crucified 2000 gnomish rebels)

          • #112878
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >literally just lie to the romans about needing help and then ambush and murder them when they’re en route to help you
            >>GERMANYBROS WE freaking DID IT BIG WIN SUCH HEROES BUILD A STATUE

          • #112897
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >sidenote: General Varus was also known for how the historian Josephus chronicals the swift action of Varus against a messianic revolt in Judaea after the death of the Roman client king, Herod the Great, in 4 BC. After occupying Jerusalem, he crucified 2000 gnomish rebels
            You do realize that Josephus is a fictional character and that his OLDEST manuscripts are dated to 11th century.

            • #112910
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >You do realize that Josephus is a fictional character and that his OLDEST manuscripts are dated to 11th century.

              History major here, and I’ve never heard of anyone doubting Josephus, even textbooks I read by Ivy League professors which are dedicated to questioning historical accuracy use Josephus as one of the most reliable sources in history. I just spent some time google to see where you get these weird ideas that Josephus isn’t real, and I can’t find anything. Is this some Nazi /poo/ stormfront stuff that you like to spread around your fellow Nazis because Josephus recorded gnomish history?

              • #112916
                Anonymous
                Guest

                No people come up with weird and random bullshit off of vague things they hear. I just had someone try to tell me that France first captured Strasbourg from the German empire in 1815 while helping the ottomans

    • #112856
      Anonymous
      Guest
    • #112857
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Probably either of those times that Germany declared war on the world.

    • #112858
      Anonymous
      Guest
    • #112859
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Martin Luther nailing 95 theses. Unlike all the other events mentioned here where the protagonist had already have some power and political backing, Luther was just a literal who peasant. The authorities could have done whatever they please to him if it weren’t for that one autistic German prince-elector who shielded him

      • #112860
        Anonymous
        Guest

        He was a monk and professor you scrotebrain

        • #112861
          Anonymous
          Guest

          and? Still a commoner

          • #112862
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Luther condoned the putting down of the largest peasant revolt in Germany. He was also from a rich family. A quick google search can teach you a few things.

            • #112870
              Anonymous
              Guest

              how does that change anything?

      • #112864
        Anonymous
        Guest

        "Nailing the theses to the church door’ sounds a hell of a lot more dramatic and aggressive than it actually was. He was a professor, and that was how the staff at his university published their articles for review. In the era before widespread printing there weren’t academic journals you could submit pieces to – and that was the best that they had. It wasn’t some defiant act against a tyrannical overlord, it was an academic publishing a piece of theoretical work that got blown wildly out of proportion (in a way he could never have foreseen and probably didn’t want) when it happened to coincide with the political and economic interests of the German nobility.
        >tl;dr – no.

    • #112863
      Anonymous
      Guest

      You see this guy, this motherfucker right here? He’s James Brooke. One day in the 19th century he and a few of his friends got bored, so they sold everything they owned, bought a clapped out – rotting – wreck of an old steam ship and started sailing east. When they arrived in Sarawak (modern Malaysia) they saw that the locals were completely under the thumb of the local pirates. They did not like this. So they spend the rest of their lives hunting pirates among the South East Asian islands, with Brooke being crowned as the Rajah of Sarawak, and the British Empire being forced to recognise his kingship, even one he refused the ‘offer’ to subsume his kingdom into the empire, instead spending decades improving Malaya himself, he’s still a national hero in modern day Malaysia
      >TFW you were born too late, and too early, for your life to be something ripped straight out of a Kipling adventure novel

      • #112865
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >instead spending decades improving Malaya himself, he’s still a national hero in modern day Malaysia
        Says who? Even Sarawakian themselves celebrate Rentap who rebelled against Brooke more than that tea sipping piss drinking Britbong.

        t. Malaysian

    • #112874
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >Ok guys, now i know that didn’t go as planned
      >But i have an idea!: we go around them, simple as

    • #112877
      Anonymous
      Guest

      When I asked my first girlfriend to sit on my face during breakfast and step on my cock while at it, and she said yes and ate two whole toasts and a mug of coffee while doing it.

    • #112879
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Napoopan hundred days is the most audacious and kino moment in history of mankind

    • #112880
      Anonymous
      Guest

      All the antisemitic insanity behind Leo Frank’s case.

      • #112881
        Anonymous
        Guest
      • #112882
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Hello ADL

        • #112890
          Anonymous
          Guest

          I’m not ADL, but I appreciate their work against the insanity of antisemitism.

          • #112913
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Everyone hates garden gnomes and they hate them for good reasons.

          • #112918
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >insanity
            how much did your rabbi pay you to write this?

      • #112888
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >garden gnome so utterly slimy and conniving that the kkk storms a jailhouse to set his negro patsy free
        The leo frank case really shows how untrustworthy your people are.

        • #112914
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Always gets a laugh from me

    • #112885
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The guy that framed Yi Sun-Shin as his country fights for existence out of jealousy to take his job and glory, fail in battle at a spectacular level, cowardly escape to an island, then finally kill himself.

    • #112891
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Otto von Bock breaking 3 french squares at the clash at Garcia-Hernandez

    • #112892
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Me confessing my feelings to a girl I loved in college in a paragraph-long Facebook message.

      • #112900
        Anonymous
        Guest

        how did she respond?

    • #112894
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I’m pretty sure one of the byzantine emperors in the 9th century told the pope, in a letter of course, that Latin was a barbarian Scythian language.

    • #112901
      G2a for Gigachad Master Race
      Guest

      Creating Gobekli Tepe:

      Person A: I see xyz astrological phenomona once in a while.

      Person B: Me too. Let’s carve some stone here to commemorate.

      Person A: You know what? I’ve noticed that these naturally growing grains here in Anatolia tend to have more food on them when the sun is at xyz position compared to these stones we just carved.

      Person B: You’re right and maybe if we pre-empt this cyclically, we can harness this.

      (Agriculture is invented)

      Person B: Amazing. Damn now all these barbarians want a part of this lifestyle. Let’s build dwelling places where you enter via the roof so the women and children can go inside when the barbarians come.

      Person A: Sounds like a plan. Almost like Proto-Polis with Proto-Hoplite?

      Person B: Ya that’s a great way of describing it. Let’s make sure these barbarian idiots know we are the big brains who can predict the cycles of the plants we eat.

      (Theocracy is invented)

      Person B: Great idea. Let’s call ourselves priests.

      Person A: Sounds good. Creates Catal Hoyuk and every other city in Anatolia.

      Person B: So if we go around doing this same thing else where like Stonehenge, people will think we’re gods?

      Person A: I don’t know but let’s find out.

      (G2a spreads to Europe and Mesopotamia)

    • #112917
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >What was the most audacious event in history?

    • #112919
      Anonymous
      Guest

      If you were an opponent of the Roman Empire, no event was more pivotal to your cause than Boudica of the Iceni’s insurrection in AD 60. The Iceni were a Celtic people who lived in North-East England. Camulodunum, their capital, was the capital of the Roman province of Britannia, and the Iceni were one of the most powerful Celtic tribes. When the Romans took over Britain in AD 43, they had the most formidable military force in the country, and they proceeded to increase in power. The Iceni, in reality, led the resistance to the Roman invasion of Britain in the early first century AD.

    • #112920
      Anonymous
      Guest

      What was the "Rubicon" moment for the Emperor in the Star Wars sage?

      BBY is "Before Battle of Yavin" (The Battle of Yavin, also known as the Battle of the Death Star, the assault on the Death Star, the attack on the Death Star, or the Miracle of Yavin, was a major battle that led to the destruction of the first Death Star. It was a crippling blow to the Empire by the Rebel Alliance

      the Republic
      >c. 1000 BBY Founding of the modern Republic; its capital on Coruscant, the seat of the Senate. The Senate governed the Republic under the Galactic Constitution, and comprised thousands of senators representing the Republic’s member worlds. Around this time, Coruscant Jedi Temple begins serving as the Jedi Order’s operational and spiritual headquarters. The Jedi Order, a religious group of Force-sensitives dedicated to the light side of the Force, was sworn to the service of the Senate, and as such the Jedi Knights were hailed as the guardians of peace and justice within the Republic
      >896 BBY Yoda is born
      >200 BBY Chewbacca is born
      >57 BBY Obi-Wan Kenobi is born
      >46 BBY Padmé Amidala is born. Her secret marriage to the Anakin Skywalker would have a lasting effect on the future of the galaxy
      >41 BBY Anakin Skywalker is born
      >22 BBY Anakin Skywalker and Padmé Amidala secretly wed on Naboo
      >20 BBY Construction of the Death Star begins

      • #112921
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Fall of the Republic
        >19 BBY the revelation that Chancellor Palpatine was secretly Darth Sidious, the Dark Lord of the Sith, Mace Windu in lightsaber duel in the Chancellor’s office on Coruscant. The duel lasted until Windu disarmed the Sith Lord and knocked him to the floor. As Windu held the Sith Lord at bladepoint, he was interrupted by the arrival of Jedi Knight Anakin Skywalker, wheo was seduced by the promise that Palpatine could use the dark side of the Force to save his wife, Padmé Amidala, from dying in childbirth, an event Skywalker saw in a vision. Windu had realized that Palpatine controlled the Senate and the judicial system, and would most likely be acquitted no matter what. Stating that Palpatine was just too dangerous to be left alive, Windu prepared to kill him, while Skywalker blurted out "I need him!" When Windu tried to make the killing blow, Skywalker severed his hand, allowing the RepublicSidious to kill the Jedi Master. In the aftermath of the duel, Skywalker pledged his loyalty to Palpatine and is anointed Darth Vader, Dark Lord of the Sith. The Jedi attempt on his life allowed Palpatine to execute his plan to seize full control over the galaxy. He branded the Jedi as traitors and issued Order 66, leading to the destruction of the Jedi Order. Shortly thereafter, Sidious transformed the Galactic Republic into the first Galactic Empire, with himself as absolute ruler.

        the Empire
        >19 BBY Skywalkers Luke and Leia are born to Padmé Amidala. Amidala dies after childbirth due to heartbreak at her lover’s fall to the dark side. In order to protect the Skywalker twins from the Sith, Obi-Wan Kenobi leaves Luke with Anakin’s stepsis Owen Lars on Tatooine while Bail Organa adopts Leia into the Alderaanian royal house. Obi-Wan Kenobi and Yoda go into exile on Tatooine and Dagobah respectively. Kenobi is tasked with ensuring the future of the Jedi by watching over Luke

        • #112922
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >10 BBY Han Solo meets Chewbacca. Han Solo makes the Kessel Run in just under thirteen parsecs, which Solo rounds down to twelve. Han Solo wins the Millennium Falcon from Lando Calrissian in a game of sabacc

          0 BBY
          >Luke Skywalker leaves Tatooine and begins training to become a Jedi
          >Leia Organa is taken to the Death Star, where she is interrogated by Darth Vader
          >Alderaan is destroyed by the Death Star
          >Leia is rescued from the Death Star; Obi-Wan Kenobi purposely dies in a duel with Darth Vader and transforms into a Force spirit.
          >The Battle of Yavin. The Death Star is destroyed by the Rebel Alliance

          4 ABY
          >Yoda dies on Dagobah; Luke Skywalker discovers that he is not only truly the son of Darth Vader, but also the sis of Leia
          >Rebel operatives discover a second Death Star at Endor

          Fall of the Empire (4 ABY)
          >Battle of Endor: Han Solo’s strike team and Ewok allies destroy the Death Star’s shield generator, allowing rebel starfighters to infiltrate the Death Star’s reactor core. The second Death Star is destroyed by the Millennium Falcon.
          >Darth Vader no longer, Anakin Skywalker kills Darth Sidious, fulfilling the prophecy of the Chosen One and bringing balance to the Force by destroying the Sith
          >Celebrations of the Empire’s fall at Endor takes place throughout the galaxy, including bonfires in Bright Tree Village, gatherings on Cloud City, a rally on Naboo, and parades on Tatooin
          >wedding of Han Solo and Leia
          >Funeral of Anakin Skywalker

      • #112926
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Fall of the Republic
        >19 BBY the revelation that Chancellor Palpatine was secretly Darth Sidious, the Dark Lord of the Sith, Mace Windu in lightsaber duel in the Chancellor’s office on Coruscant. The duel lasted until Windu disarmed the Sith Lord and knocked him to the floor. As Windu held the Sith Lord at bladepoint, he was interrupted by the arrival of Jedi Knight Anakin Skywalker, wheo was seduced by the promise that Palpatine could use the dark side of the Force to save his wife, Padmé Amidala, from dying in childbirth, an event Skywalker saw in a vision. Windu had realized that Palpatine controlled the Senate and the judicial system, and would most likely be acquitted no matter what. Stating that Palpatine was just too dangerous to be left alive, Windu prepared to kill him, while Skywalker blurted out "I need him!" When Windu tried to make the killing blow, Skywalker severed his hand, allowing the RepublicSidious to kill the Jedi Master. In the aftermath of the duel, Skywalker pledged his loyalty to Palpatine and is anointed Darth Vader, Dark Lord of the Sith. The Jedi attempt on his life allowed Palpatine to execute his plan to seize full control over the galaxy. He branded the Jedi as traitors and issued Order 66, leading to the destruction of the Jedi Order. Shortly thereafter, Sidious transformed the Galactic Republic into the first Galactic Empire, with himself as absolute ruler.

        the Empire
        >19 BBY Skywalkers Luke and Leia are born to Padmé Amidala. Amidala dies after childbirth due to heartbreak at her lover’s fall to the dark side. In order to protect the Skywalker twins from the Sith, Obi-Wan Kenobi leaves Luke with Anakin’s stepsis Owen Lars on Tatooine while Bail Organa adopts Leia into the Alderaanian royal house. Obi-Wan Kenobi and Yoda go into exile on Tatooine and Dagobah respectively. Kenobi is tasked with ensuring the future of the Jedi by watching over Luke

        >10 BBY Han Solo meets Chewbacca. Han Solo makes the Kessel Run in just under thirteen parsecs, which Solo rounds down to twelve. Han Solo wins the Millennium Falcon from Lando Calrissian in a game of sabacc

        0 BBY
        >Luke Skywalker leaves Tatooine and begins training to become a Jedi
        >Leia Organa is taken to the Death Star, where she is interrogated by Darth Vader
        >Alderaan is destroyed by the Death Star
        >Leia is rescued from the Death Star; Obi-Wan Kenobi purposely dies in a duel with Darth Vader and transforms into a Force spirit.
        >The Battle of Yavin. The Death Star is destroyed by the Rebel Alliance

        4 ABY
        >Yoda dies on Dagobah; Luke Skywalker discovers that he is not only truly the son of Darth Vader, but also the sis of Leia
        >Rebel operatives discover a second Death Star at Endor

        Fall of the Empire (4 ABY)
        >Battle of Endor: Han Solo’s strike team and Ewok allies destroy the Death Star’s shield generator, allowing rebel starfighters to infiltrate the Death Star’s reactor core. The second Death Star is destroyed by the Millennium Falcon.
        >Darth Vader no longer, Anakin Skywalker kills Darth Sidious, fulfilling the prophecy of the Chosen One and bringing balance to the Force by destroying the Sith
        >Celebrations of the Empire’s fall at Endor takes place throughout the galaxy, including bonfires in Bright Tree Village, gatherings on Cloud City, a rally on Naboo, and parades on Tatooin
        >wedding of Han Solo and Leia
        >Funeral of Anakin Skywalker

        why are you talking about star wars?

Viewing 42 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
startno id