What exactly about the Chinese culture does the “Hanfu Movement” seek to revive?

Home Forums History What exactly about the Chinese culture does the “Hanfu Movement” seek to revive?

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    • #102652
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I often hear about the "Hanfu Movement" as the desire of people to revive the original Chinese culture, but what exactly do they want to "revive"? What dynasty clothes do they want to take as a basis, or are they ready to wear any of the variations? (but then it’s just cosplay).

      And why are these "real" Chinese not satisfied with Qipao and Tangzhuang as a further development of traditional clothing in the modern era? In addition, this adaptation was created by the Chinese.

    • #102653
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >but what exactly do they want to "revive"?
      most of them just look like they’re having fun and want to wear something nicer than their boring office clothes.

    • #102654
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >but what exactly do they want to "revive"?
      Their culture? You answered your own question

      • #102662
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Their culture?

        […]
        Yes, but the roots of the movement also have links to the Chinese Nationalist and Han supremacist movements. Not that the average hanfu wearer cares.

        >have links to the Chinese Nationalist and Han supremacist movements.
        "Restoring" any cultural connection with dynastic pre-Qin China would make sense if it was about creating modern clothing with a strong influence of traditional elements, since "true" Chinese deny the influence of the Manchus. A couple of quite nice examples of this approach
        >https://ziseviolet.tumblr.com/post/186481410855/do-you-know-where-we-could-buy-modernized-hanfu-or
        >https://www.hanfumodern.com/

        If they just put on an antique costume, regardless of the time and dynasties to which such clothes belong, then this is an ordinary cosplay.

        In defense of Koreans and Japanese, I can say that the tradition of wearing national clothes there was not interrupted as much as in China and still has a direct reception from the old fashion, moreover, even now it is used in many solemn and official ceremonies, remaining relatively relevant.

        • #102785
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >the tradition of wearing national clothes there was not interrupted as much as in China and still has a direct reception from the old fashion, moreover, even now it is used in many solemn and official ceremonies, remaining relatively relevant.
          That’s why the Chinese want to revive it.

    • #102655
      Anonymous
      Guest

      2, 4 and 5 look really nice

      • #102678
        Anonymous
        Guest

        King

    • #102656
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I just want a reunifed Joseon GF, I’ll do anything to achieve this goal.

      • #102661
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Shit taste

      • #102685
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Technically North Koreans still call their country Joseon to this day.

    • #102657
      Anonymous
      Guest

      It’s more of a fashion movement than anything. People think the clothes are pretty and comfortable and so they want to wear them. This follows from the loosening of social norms and increasing importance of fashion in the decades of westernization in Korea and China, and the rise of social media today. In other words, when you’re posting pictures of yourself all the time, you want to stand out and look pretty, which is what these clothes do. Ironically, "traditional" dress returned because of completely non-traditional, foreign social behavior

    • #102658
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I want a hanfu!
      (Translator’s note: Hanfu = Han Chinese waifu)

    • #102659
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Chairman Xi initiative to rejuvenate cultural confidence of the Chinese nation

      • #102664
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Not really, the movement was started organically by a factory worker more than 15 years ago.

        • #102665
          Anonymous
          Guest

          can you tell me more about that?

          • #102668
            Anonymous
            Guest

            On November 22, 2003, this factory worker from Zhengzhou in Henan province named Wang Letian started wearing crude Hanfu in public, which he apparently made privately by consulting ancient texts and getting help from his friends to complete his projects. Understandably, a lot of the local people he encountered while wearing that made fun of him or just perplexed; however, he did also get a ton of positive attention from Chinese-language media and audiences all the way to Singapore.

            That was basically the foundation of Hanfu subculture. In the initial years, it was seen as a weird niche for otakus, history nerds, and Han ultranationalists by mainstream culture (it definitely was when I personally gained an interest in Hanfu around 2012 or so), but Hanfu went really viral around 2018 thanks to combination of different factors.

            • #102681
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Interesting, i wonder if there are any similar movements in history, off the top of my head i really can’t think of a time where fashion trends in, say, Britain conciously attempted to emulate the past

              • #102683
                Anonymous
                Guest

                All of the Folk costumes in Europe are an attempt at emulating the past. Heck, even Japan’s tradition of kimono wearing to special occasions comes from the same brand of German autism.

              • #102787
                Anonymous
                Guest
            • #102684
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Sweet that this occurred in the urban hellhive that is Zhengzhou

            • #102812
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >kickstarted by 1 enthusiastic autist
              holy woke af

      • #102680
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Chairman Xi
        >wanting to preserve ancient Chinese culture

    • #102663
      Anonymous
      Guest

      essentially it’s a sort of ethnic Han chauvinism in which people reject the Qipao and Tangzhuang because they are manchu in origin, the problem of course is that the skys the limit on which exact period’s clothing you want to revive. Ming? Song? Tang? Han?

    • #102666
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I think it’s like the Chinese equivalent of Janelle Monae wearing African clothes. I’ve read that the Hanfu thing is a fashion trend led by women, but most aren’t even wearing it on the subway because that would be a little out of place. It seems "traditional" but it’s actually hyper-modern, and that seems contradictory but it really isn’t, because whatever "values" these traditions had 150 years ago have been smashed into atoms and then reassembled with completely new values.

      https://youtu.be/q2WvTaqe9zU

    • #102688
      Anonymous
      Guest

      we need more national dress revivals all over the world

      • #102696
        Anonymous
        Guest

        This

    • #102689
      Anonymous
      Guest

      What gets me about Hanfu stuff is that everyone seems to want to dress as a Ming dynasty princess or scholar-official. I don’t see anyone putting on Chinese peasant’s clothing.

      • #102701
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >What gets me about Hanfu stuff is that everyone seems to want to dress as a Ming dynasty princess or scholar-official.

        Most of them are middle-class college grads who passed the gao-kao so they would historically qualify for low-level bureaucracy lmao.

        Also there’s the fact that Hanfu for commoners – pic related- resembles the Chinese Martial Arts uniform. So its not as attractive unless you actually do Martial Arts.

        • #102704
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Hanfu is great and all, but the pseuds who shit on everything Qing for the sake of it deserve a visit by the firing squad.
          Fashion of the time had plenty of fairly baller shit. And the modern qipaos are the God’s gift to humanity.
          Attacking it just because it’s foreign in origin is the same kind of bullshit as attacking any pants because of that. Same thing with Tang and their brutally steppe-woke af attire for men. MCs in 长安十二时辰 absolutely nail that look.

          I’m pretty sure a commoner did not get to wear those black leather boots.
          At least I know them as being leather from Matteo Ricci’s account of Ming. I never could have guessed that from most hanfu dressups.

          • #102714
            Anonymous
            Guest

            This. Hanfu just can’t compete with a modern classic. They should just face reality.

          • #102716
            Anonymous
            Guest

            People shit on that character because it looks like crap. Its outfit may look accurate or not, but it doesnt matter since she’s from a fictional world.

          • #102724
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >Attacking it just because it’s foreign in origin is the same kind of bullshit as attacking any pants because of that. Same thing with Tang and their brutally steppe-woke af attire for men.

            Who are you quoting? Tang-Dynasty stuff is EXTREMELY popular in Hanfu circles, especially the Sogdian Robe.

            • #102781
              Anonymous
              Guest

              That’s my point.
              How some groups within the community take "Chinese clothing isn’t just late Qing fashion" and turn it into "Chinese clothing is 100% amazing, 100% pure before the barbarian foreigners started cutting people’s heads off and ‘forced’ us to abandon it."
              Which is both a historylet take and attacks like half of the fashion throughout historical China. Whether it’s the pants in Han or Sogdian inspired shit in Tang.

      • #102725
        Anonymous
        Guest

        How does it "get you?" If they can afford to dress like that they might as well, not that there was ever anything wrong with peasant attire but you may as well make an impression if its within your means.

        • #102743
          Anonymous
          Guest

          I’m just saying, the whole point of Hanfu is ostensibly for the Chinese people to reconnect with their cultural heritage and make it a part of their daily lives, but the vast majority of people in 16th century China would not have worn elegant flowing robes, regardless of how nice they look.

          • #102751
            Anonymous
            Guest

            To be fair, the same is true for basically any culture and their history. 90% of anything was peasants in worn-out work clothes, but people rather focus on the small minority of nobles, warriors, clergy and leaders because that’s where all the fancy and interesting stuff happened.

            • #102811
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Hanfu is a rich person’s hobby though. The factory worker who started it made his own Hanfu so the complaint that he was aping old nobles and shit doesn’t hold that much water.

      • #102810
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >peasant
        Why be so concerned about dressing as someone you’re not?

    • #102690
      Anonymous
      Guest
    • #102753
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Hanfu is a cosplay LARP and most scrotes don’t care about it.

      Most of their outfits are completely fabricated, made-up, pulled out of their ass, etc.

      Let’s use the "kimono" as an example. It was initially a piece of cloth which they wrapped around themselves and held together with a rope. When the Meiji discovered how to design and sew clothes through Western books, they changed the kimono and started to style it into what you see today.
      Seriously, if you want to know what scrote clothes looked like before the 19th century, buy a massive flag or something and wrap yourself around it and hold it together with a rope around your chest, that’s basically how they always dressed.

      scrotes are ugly as fuck and extremely fake. They dress and behave like Westerners and wear a shitton of make-up and get plastic surgeries to look more "White". This cosplay LARP is basically a way for a few pathetic scrotes to pretend they’re not White worshipers, a pathetic coping mechanism because anyone with a working brain can see through their facade.

      • #102764
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >buy a massive flag or something and wrap yourself around it and hold it together with a rope around your chest
        Sounds more like Greco-Roman clothing. Nothing wrong with that

      • #102809
        Anonymous
        Guest

        i think you’re coping over the fact that the extent of white american cultural dress is cargo shorts, crocs and a ‘Who Farted’ T-shirt stitched in Vietnam. throw some cold water on your steaming red face, mate

    • #102756
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >Qipao and Tangzhuang
      those are manchurian not han

      • #102818
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >those are manchurian not han
        This is the official clothing of the Chinese empire during the Qin dynasty, which was modernized by the Han people after the revolution in 1911.

        That is, Qipao and Tangzhuang are the national Chinese clothing, which reflects both the history of the Empire and the development of modern China.

        Hanfu in the old versions is just cosplay.

    • #102784
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I hope that western business suits get replaced by the Mao suit.

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