We are way more advanced technologically than we think we are

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    • #49139
      Anonymous
      Guest

      We are waaaaaaaay more advanced technologically than we think we are. We’re at like what we’d think 2077 would be like. We could do Cyberpunk 2077 but the change has to be gradual so our minds don’t adapt to the change in a healthy way or something. Also they use a lot of it for spooky intelligence agency and secret military stuff so it’s classified. They had Jet fighters and nukes in like 1939. And we’re supposed to think that we’ve only advanced in a few areas mostly communications and targeting/evasion of targeting, but they had sound barrier breaking, radar evading jets in like 148

      Anyway Tesla probably invented the internet the first iPhone was a proof of concept but basically tech from the late 90s. They briefly attempted to sell tablet computers in the 90s but the infrastructure wasn’t there yet. They could have done a lot more a lot faster imo thanks for coming to my ted talk. What are some examples of [CLASSIFIED] tech that you’ve heard rumors of?

    • #49140
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >plane leaking fuel from it’s wings
      >advanced
      pick one

      • #49142
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Flies at like 38000kmph
        >Not advanced

        • #49160
          Anonymous
          Guest

          damn, that’s like… escape velocity. it’s not that advanced, it was revolutionary with use of titanium tho.

      • #49143
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Overcomes a fundamental problem with a creative solution
        Submit

        • #49145
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >it’s not a bug, it’s a feature!

      • #49152
        Anonymous
        Guest

        this. there are so many things wrong with this piece of shit it isn’t even funny.

      • #49158
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Mach 3 cruise speed
        >Leaky fuel tank

        Fixed it. Now choose one.

      • #49182
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >metal expands when heated
        >no leaking when at mach 3
        wow you really are a smart one

      • #49188
        Anonymous
        Guest
    • #49144
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Cloaking.

      Not 100% sure how it works. Something with using cameras to project images from the other side of the object + layers of artificial distortion + "seamfilling" where multiple camera feeds are blended into each other to produce seemingly 1 image

      • #49147
        Anonymous
        Guest

        A coarse system like this well known from WWII. Just light rather than images is sufficient. This is now being developed for tanks.

      • #49174
        Anonymous
        Guest

        waveguide metamaterials, theres youtube videos on how to DIY them

    • #49146
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Sonic weaponry. Weather modding via electronic/remote sources.

      I think the idea is that technology is used first to develop weapons and whatnot. Military use. And everything consumer-allowable is leaked, or if its being pursued already in the private sphere, it is allowed to continue.

      Also, compression. Data compression. We could probably do way more than we can currently.

      • #49156
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Sonic weaponry

        This is from 2008:

        >The report explained several types of non-lethal laser applications, including microwave hearing, disrupted neural control, and microwave heating. For the first type, short pulses of RF energy (2450 MHz) can generate a pressure wave in solids and liquids. When exposed to pulsed RF energy, humans experience the immediate sensation of "microwave hearing" – sounds that may include buzzing, ticking, hissing, or knocking that originate within the head.

        >The report predicts that communicating at longer distances would be possible with larger equipment, while shorter range signals could be generated with portable equipment. Putting voices in people´s heads could cause what the report calls "psychologically devastating" effects. The technology might even allow for communicating with an individual hostage surrounded by captors, although this would require "extreme directional specificity."

        https://phys.org/news/2008-02-pentagon-lasers-voices.html

        • #49164
          Anonymous
          Guest

          So what you’re saying it’s not tinnitus, it’s just Pentagon calling?

      • #49161
        Anonymous
        Guest

        […]

        I’m sort of an oldfag who has had a lot of different interests and hobbies over the years. One directly related item I use came from war. I was really really into freediving around 2010 or so. Considering I have a very large body of deep water near by, which was also how I made a living before I learned to computer (commercial diver), freediving seemed like a natural hobby to take up.
        Got really good at it. Also did some pretty serious amateur research on some effects many freedivers feel post dive. Got the US Navy involved and everything.
        Anyway, part of research into breath holding is knowing the rate at which you are consuming oxygen or the level of oxygen in the blood at different points of the breath hold.
        In the 1950’s-1960’s the hay day of blood-oxygen level testing was by slicing your arm deeply to draw out blood to immediately test it. Ahhh the US Navy Experimental Diving Unit… Those guys were volunteer guinea pigs and you never hear about what the Navy did to them but will forever hear about Tuskegee experiments or other gently caress-ups because the narrative… You will hear about Jacques Cousteau but never about the first Saturation diving system.
        In the 70’s and 80’s it had advanced to the point hospitals had giant machines that could measure it. Of course, Moore’s law had something to say and these got smaller and smaller, and more affordable. By the 90’s every hospital had a 2ft x 2ft, 30lb pulse oximeter on a cart. When I started freediving, pulse oximeters, through the war effort, had become palm sized versions that could be deployed to the battlefield with every medic. In short time, they got even smaller to what we see today. It was only through the necessities of war (though war isn’t a necessity…all the time) that the pulse oximeter went from a multi-thousand dollar giant machine only present in hospitals to the finger-sized monitor on the shelves of every corner drug store in America.

        • #49165
          Anonymous
          Guest

          it’s pretty amazing how many things are only possible thanks to the solid-state transistor and light-emitting diode

        • #49190
          Anonymous
          Guest

          that was actually a cool story, bro

          🙂

    • #49148
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Some people do a bit of advanced stuff, the rest is bloody retards who may have access to computers that got exponentially better for a prolonged time but doesn’t know how to do anything other than to press a few software buttons.

      This is why 2021 will feel like 2021 and not 2277 to someone born in the 1960s.

      • #49157
        Anonymous
        Guest

        People in the 60s were promised homes on Mars and the moon flying cars, jetpacks and more. They have plenty reasons to be disappointed.

        • #49163
          Anonymous
          Guest

          > homes on Mars and the moon
          Promised by who and why would you want to live on mars? You probably can’t even terraform Mars, so it’s just as attractive as living in a desert but with more radiation and no air.

          BTW the deserts on earth aren’t yet occupied, if you want to go there basically no one will stop you.

          > flying cars
          Airplanes, helicopters, no real problem here. Real cities don’t want the noise and accident chances of having these for individualized transport all the time though, and there’s nothing the 60’s nuclear powered flying jet cars (or whatever) would change about that if you thought about it for a damn second.

          • #49169
            Anonymous
            Guest

            The promise was just seeing how the US went from catching up to beating the Soviet Union in the space race to the moon. It was never a signed document.
            As for terraforming people of the time were confident that would be overcome in just a few years.
            Deserts here on earth tend to be full of people who will kill you, hardly inviting. Mars would be better.

            • #49183
              Anonymous
              Guest

              The USA lost the space race and then moved goal posts to the moon race and won that one.

              Still a great achievement, but the moon race wasn’t that interesting to anyone else because there’s not much you can do on the moon. Not without massive capability to supply the moon, at least, and even then… eh.

              > As for terraforming people of the time were confident that would be overcome in just a few years.
              Some authors and a few people who hadn’t investigated much yet, but anyone with some brains was "uh, the volume of our atmosphere is… what?" "uh, why is Mars’ atmosphere even basically gone?" and so on. Same thing here.

              > Deserts here on earth tend to be full of people who will kill you, hardly inviting. Mars would be better.
              Heh. Few deserts are this dangerous. Most desert people are pretty cool guys.

    • #49149
      Anonymous
      Guest

      > We are waaaaaaaay more advanced technologically than we think we are
      let me guess, you never had the job? Its literally an opposite, so much pop sci le flying cars AI quntum computer crap in mainstream media yet industry is filled with incompetent retards

    • #49150
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The system of production we have is capitalism, stuff is only made for profit, there is MUCH more profit in building a monopoly and slowly evolving a product while buying out smaller competitors, just make the initial cost of investment high enough and you have the market to your self

    • #49151
      Anonymous
      Guest

      i think we’re exactly as advanced as we think we are

    • #49153
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >We are waaaaaaaay more advanced technologically than we think we are. We’re at like what we’d think 2077 would be like. We could do Cyberpunk 2077 but the change has to be gradual so our minds don’t adapt to the change in a healthy way or something.

      • #49155
        Anonymous
        Guest

        it’s not nice to make fun of 12 year olds

      • #49180
        Anonymous
        Guest

        /thread

        • #49181
          Anonymous
          Guest

          good thread, retard OP

    • #49162
      Anonymous
      Guest

      > We could do Cyberpunk 2077 but the change has to be gradual so our minds don’t adapt to the change in a healthy way or something
      our minds
      Rather our spiritual state has not caught up to the levels of technology that we have today.
      We, as a people, have gotten too far ahead of ourselves.
      I’m not a Luddite, by any means, but with all the advances in technology, going as far back as the early 1900’s in addition to the lack of Spiritual advancement, is very lopsided.

      • #49167
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Rather our spiritual state has not caught up to the levels of technology that we have today.
        >We, as a people, have gotten too far ahead of ourselves.
        That’s because any spiritual model that was capable of embracing humanity’s current capabilities would not be Abrahamic. Without the shield of religious obfuscation it becomes immediately obvious what group is responsible for society’s ills.

      • #49176
        Anonymous
        Guest

        normally i disagree with people who say "spirit" like this, but honestly I agree completely
        kurzweil is an optimist, and he says 50% chance of civilization collapse in the near-mid future

    • #49166
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Why do techphiles always want to progress our dystopia?

    • #49168
      Anonymous
      Guest

      To anyone thinking OP is a schizo:

      Inform yourself on what technology enterprise is using right now, go on the enterprise part of the consumer websites you visit and just take a look at all those features. Or just watch on ebay all the enterprise technology from 2010 being sold and being even better than what you can buy right now on Amazon.

      Ask anyone who has worked at FAGMAN about the internal software tools they use. If they were in any kind of decent position at the company they will tell you that the shit they’re using is at least 5-10 years ahead than the market.

      If you have anyone who has worked in the military in the engineering or QA departments they will tell you the same thing.

      • #49185
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >at least 5-10 years ahead than the market.
        I call BS they just use the same MS shit as everyone and some Linux

    • #49171
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >they

      (((they)))?

      whothegently caress is "they"

    • #49172
      Anonymous
      Guest

      That not super advanced, that’s super expensive.

      • #49173
        Anonymous
        Guest

        yeah, fancy bomb fast plane
        doesnt mean anything in terms of long-term sustainable projects which produce value instead of window brokening

    • #49175
      Anonymous
      Guest

      this is somewhat true, but its not "corporations" or "they" or "garden gnomes" or whatever, its conservatives, old people and conspiracy theorist freaks.

      humanity could be moving at a much faster pace in almost every category, but religious cultists and "WHY CANT WE GO BACK TO THE 1950s" people hold us back at every turn. they stifle progress in education, and fight every progressive law so that it takes 10 years so that faggots can marry, they push to slash funding to everything in government under the guise of saving money when in reality its just a method to control the lower class and keep people dependent

      • #49178
        Anonymous
        Guest

        The funny thing is that rate of development felt faster in the 60s than today.
        1960: Gary Powers was shot down in his U2
        1968: Blackbird hammered across the skies with utter impunity.
        Today: F-35 is better described as an example of a design by committees.

        • #49186
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Planes for (cold) warfare are rather dead, and have been for decades really.
          Spy satellites beat any spy plane in most scenarios, barring the physical limits of resolution or weather patterns
          Combat planes are more like mini-carriers for semi-autonomous systems ever since over-the-horizon warfare became the norm
          Dominating an airspace rather than contesting one is still good for manned aircraft, but even then, helicopters provide great air support to ground troops too.
          Unmanned and autonomous systems are where all the innovation is, which is probably why we don’t hear much about it unless some guy’s xbox controller disconnects in germany and his drone flies into a terror camp in the mountains and ends up in a terrorist propaganda broadcast

          • #49187
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >helicopters provide great air support to ground troops too.

            Only in a few constabulary missions. They’re soft targets easily kill by conventional ground fire and as MANPADS proliferate they’re becoming gallery targets. Remove meatbags from cockpits and you don’t need CSAR (or disasters like the defeat portrayed in Bat 21) and can get on with killing like the Turkish and Israeli UAS just did in Nargorno-Karabakh.

          • #49189
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >Planes for (cold) warfare are rather dead, and have been for decades really.
            Tell that to the white scarf pilot brigade. To reach the AF top you need time as a fighter pilot and they refuse to entertain any idea that you can pilot a craft from the ground. The arguments fielded are insane. About as insane as a pilot hopped up on "go-pills".

    • #49177
      Anonymous
      Guest

      a lot of tech has to be very careful not to spark an arms race
      e.g. miniature drone swarming – NATO probably has the capability to weaponise drone swarms real quick, given that a few grad students and a couple thousand dollars can create swarming tech.
      but the moment that happens, the anti-NATO people – Russia, China, Bumfuckistan – all start going ‘oh shit we need that’
      and the competition will accelerate the pace of development, but it will also lead to the proliferation of an incredibly dangerous technology.
      and when the big militaries never enter a war, all the surplus slowly leaks into the water supply, and somehow Ali-G-Hadi in a desert bunker is suddenly rather more dangerous.
      right now, any decent software engineer will have the capacity to make an autonomous killer drone given 6 months and the motivation, but most people realise that the result isn’t worth the risk.
      so, the military tells the politicians ‘we need more armor plates’, as who would defund ‘keping are boys safe in afgan (sic)’, the military asks the industrial complex to keep trying (and failing) to come up with a viable defence, and the industrial complex tells the researchers ‘yeah nah, i dont see the need for that research’ and everyone pretends that there’s nothing to see here and hopes that the next Ali-G-Hadi can’t use an arduino.

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