How can we explain the Fermi paradox?

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    • #92934
      Anonymous
      Guest

      What is LULZ‘s answer to the Fermi Paradox?

    • #92935
      Anonymous
      Guest

      It’s either the creation of life/Eurakyotes
      or
      It’s something farther down the line that we can’t even comprehend yet

    • #92936
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Porn addiction. I’m serious.

      • #93099
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Please, I try to stop that, don’t talk about it in LULZ.

    • #92937
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The Fermi Paradox™ isnt a paradox

      • #92939
        Anonymous
        Guest

        This

        Its made up illogical bullshit to appeal to reddit "i freaking love science" types

      • #92945
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Intelligence is likely a weird aberration, just look at a history of its evolution and you see how much coincidence all piled up together rather than just evolve something that can eat, shit, and breed more effectively than the other things designed to to eat, shit, and breed.

        Hell, Universe isn’t even that old yet, non zero chance we’re the first, or at least the effective first because we will never reach the random rock a billion billion billion light years away from the observable universe that intelligence somehow managed to evolve before us, only for its sun to explode or a pandemic to wipe them out before they could figure out how to develop rockets with their gravity 50 times stronger than ours. They could also just be underwater and never industrialize. They could also just never be social enough to form the concept of civilization, hell they could be much smarter than us on average but still never leave the stone age because they just don’t develop writing or speech.

        People severely underestimate how many "filters" we’ve already passed.

        • #92947
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >Intelligence is likely a weird aberration

          It’s not. Life on Earth was getting progressively more intelligent.

          • #93023
            Anonymous
            Guest

            LOL no, if it wasn’t for a random cosmic event, dinos would still be the dominant species on this planet

            • #93024
              Anonymous
              Guest

              And Troodontids were getting progressively smarter, unlike this board which seems to be going the other way. Every time I come back it’s somehow even worse.

            • #93025
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Who’s to say eventually some dino species (avian or otherwise) wouldn’t have achieved our level of intelligence, sociability and technological prowess? They would have had 65 million years for that, some were already bipedal, and maybe competition with each other would have eventually pushed the same adaptations toward primitive tool use, bipedal gait and grasping hands etc. that we went through

              • #93026
                Anonymous
                Guest

                because they ruled the earth for longer than they have been extinct
                advanced intelligence was clearly not needed to be on top of the food chain

                • #93028
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  Yes, I get that, but dinosaurs were not a monolithic group, they were perhaps more diverse than land vertebrates living on Earth right now
                  This is just like saying that big mammal predators ruled the Earth so there was no need for some useles lemurs to evolve into intelligent primates (which, by the way, I just found happened not that much after the extinctions of the dinosaurs)
                  Maybe, eventually, some of the reptilian bottom feeders would have adapted to bring them closer to the playing field (and to better survive the T-Rexes and such), and maybe that would have taken a path similar to primates

                  • #93032
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    doesn’t matter if it take longer than the probability of asteroid reset
                    this whole discussion is about probability, and clearly the probability for intelligent life, heck even multicellular life, to exist is ridiculously low

                    • #93036
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      >clearly the probability for intelligent life, heck even multicellular life, to exist is ridiculously low
                      Too low of a sample size to know, really
                      Maybe it happens in every star system
                      Some people speculat that the nature of electrochemical interactions itself pushes for abiogenesis and the eventual evolution of complex life, though that’s a bit close to intelligent design for my taste

          • #93047
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Orcas are smart, though they will never ever become a technological civilisation.

      • #92977
        Anonymous
        Guest

        To be fair nothing is *actually* a paradox, as paradoxes are not in reality but in our failure to understand it. So what is paradox or not is subjective. That being said, why would anyone think there’s anything paradoxical about the "Fermi paradox" is beyond me. Yes we don’t know the answer, but that’s not the same thing as a paradox, where all conceivable solutions seem implausible.

        • #92985
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >where all conceivable solutions seem implausible.
          which is what the ferminazis actually believe, but with a sampole size of 1 you can infer anything you want

        • #93167
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Woke af

      • #93117
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >The Fermi Paradox™ isnt a paradox

    • #92938
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Life is not only improbable but also very fragile. I’m guessing no other planet in the entire history of the unvierse ever made it as far as land animals.

      • #92948
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Life is fragile
        >Has survived dozens of mass extinction events
        >Nearly entire planet still teeming with life
        >Life so resilient we literally call it weeds penetrating our strongest concrete
        >We need to use literal pesticides to protect ourselves from pests
        >Life is fragile
        You’re dumbass.

    • #92940
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >guys we can’t detect massively powerful radio broadcasts that would be totally stupid for any advanced civilization to send
      >wow must be a paradox
      give it a few thousand years of searching with nothing turning up, then I’ll care

      • #93045
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Why bother with signals when you can easily detect large scale manufacturing/computing across the galaxy?

      • #93121
        Anonymous
        Guest

        people don’t seem to understand about natural interference and signal degradation. we have some incredible powerful broadcasting equipment and listening dishes trained on our own voyager probes
        and they have to shut off anything that takes even a sliver of power besides the radio just to keep in contact with it; a radio signal from another solar system would have lost almost any usefulness besides the most basic morse code usage, the energy and power needed to send a "sci-fi movies" information filled broadcast directly to earth would be enormous, the radio signals currently being picked up almost all come from stars undergoing various massive events, expecting another planet like earth(intelligence/makeup wise) to have broadcasted viable to pickup and use signals is ONLY possible if the "civilization" that does it can tap directly into a suns power AND bend space/time to do so efficiently

        but using all those alien watch dishes to do astrology work does help with theoretical and applied physics/astronomy

      • #93141
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Populations on earth stop growing when they wealthy. Technology gets smaller and more efficient when it advances. UFOs are the life you are looking for, and they don’t need to build Dyson spheres to have a good time, obviously

    • #92941
      Anonymous
      Guest

      obligatory copypasta
      > Mirage Men (2013)
      tldw: only 5% of UFO sightings are real, the rest is a psyop, typically by US agencies (CIA), to control the public opinion, to influence politicians or to scare enemies (China, Russia). As June 2021, it’s to distract from real problems in the gov or economy or some Epstein stuff.
      Also, as Snowden already revealed, the aliens never contacted the CIA (which must be seething about this very hard).
      Anyway, the Zoo Hypothesis is real: we are one pre-warp uncontacted planet and a handful of alien species from the Galactic Federation are checking on us since millennia (like we check the uncontacted tribe of the Sentinelese on their island)
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoo_hypothesis
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_reported_UFO_sightings
      Do you want a first contact? Clean the planet, stop climate change and global ecosystem collapse, stop wars and declare world peace, it’s the easiest way, the other one is to achieve FTL propulsion or communication.

      • #92944
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >if we all become hippys the ayys will share their secrets with us

        • #92970
          Anonymous
          Guest

          braindead scrotebrain

        • #93108
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >dude give up the nukes and take this shot that prevents all cancers

      • #93012
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >wanting an even bigger government to oppress you
        No. I’ll take their guns and ships and immortality and computers but if they try to tell me what to do I will absolutely RKM every Federation planet and installation I can.

      • #93106
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I agree with parts of what you said, but no, doing all those things wont magically cause ayys to pop out and say hi. You can do all things but you can not change humanities basic instincts: we are violent savages when it comes down to it.

      • #93152
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >FTL propulsion or communication

    • #92942
      Anonymous
      Guest

      A mixture of various flavors of the zoo hypothesis, and the fact we barely even started looking and with poor quality to boot.

    • #92943
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >pull probabilities regarding habitable planets and spontaneous creation of life out of your ass
      >come to baseless conclusion woke af on said probability ass pull
      >speculate as to the cause of this baseless conclusion
      This is the most reddit "paradox" ever.

    • #92946
      Anonymous
      Guest

      We simply lack the instruments to detect anything yet.

    • #92949
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Either it’s physically impossible to travel through space or every possible living species has been filtered by its own intelligence. Imagine the smartest any human could be was 80IQ, the most advanced societies would be worse than third world countries were before receiving technology from first world. Maybe nor humans or any possible species can develop any artificial mind smarter than themselves.

    • #92950
      Anonymous
      Guest

      me in the pic

    • #92955
      Anonymous
      Guest

      it basically proves space travel is impossible

      • #92957
        Anonymous
        Guest

        This is dumb as fuck.

        • #92959
          Anonymous
          Guest

          No, the other anon is right. Interplanetary travel is possible, but interstellar is not. We like to believe otherwise because we’ve been fed SciFi all our lives. But reality isn’t the way how storytelling people imagine. It’s how physics dictates it.
          People don’t realize just how big and empty the universe is and what it means that stuff is thousands of light years away.

          • #92963
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Flight is impossible for cavemen

            • #92971
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >dude, just use techmology

              • #92981
                Anonymous
                Guest

                >missed the point and reverts to shitposting

                • #92990
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  Apparently you missed the point. In a big way. Cavemen could see birds. They could observe that flight, in principle, is possible. That’s the point of the Fermi Paradox. We don’t see the example of others.

                  • #92998
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    There is no paradox. There’s perfect reasonable suggestions for the question, therefore there is no paradox.

                    • #93000
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      Don’t get hung up on the choice of the name to avoid the question.

                      • #93006
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >to avoid the question
                        The question?
                        Was it when you posted

                        >dude, just use techmology
                        ???

                        Or was it when you then retreated from shitposting and moved the goalposts to
                        >Apparently you missed the point. In a big way. Cavemen could see birds. They could observe that flight, in principle, is possible. That’s the point of the Fermi Paradox. We don’t see the example of others.
                        ???? Because I don’t see any questions there little man

                      • #93010
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >The question?
                        >???
                        >????
                        >Because I don’t see any questions
                        Why we don’t see aliens. You know, the thing the thread is about, stupid.

                      • #93015
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Who freaking knows, scrotebrain?

                      • #93019
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Here’s my solution to the Fermi paradox
                        Every race that wants to achieve unity, efficiency and kickstart interstellar and eventually intergalactic capacity has to overcome the Great Filter
                        What is this filter? An ecological disaster? An energy crisis? Wiping out the specie by high-tech infighting? A cosmic event?
                        No, the Great Filter is the garden gnomes.
                        A garden gnome-like culture will emerge on any planet harboring intelligent life, and it will hold it back by hoarding and profiting for 99% of the available resources in a 1% demographic and promoting divisiveness for their own end.
                        Such garden gnomes must be purged before the process of healing and evolving can begin.
                        Anyway, supposean interstellar civilization comes to know of Earth and its inhabitants, and decides to study our culture before making contact… And finds out the garden gnomes among us.
                        What is such a culture to think?
                        I’ll tell you what: "Fuck no, we already dealt with them once, the primitives are on their own."
                        In conclusion, ther are aliens watching us, and just like in Star Trek the Federation would wait for us to develop warp-capacity before initiating contact, they wait for one thiong only: that we take care of our garden gnomes on our own.

                  • #93003
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    Exactly. The only options are that advanced life is extraordinarily rare, advanced life destroys itself, or advanced life can’t travel between stars.

          • #92967
            Anonymous
            Guest

            The issue isn’t distance, at least for the closest star systems. It’s space radiation. We don’t have the materials to withstand whatever it is outside the Oort cloud. Cryosleep is theoretically possible and people could be sent 5 lightyears away at half the speed of light a few hundred years from now

            • #92968
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Water and magnets.

          • #92972
            Anonymous
            Guest

            The entire milky way is only 100,000 light years across. Our closest stars are less then 10 light years away. You are just dumb. Interstellar travel is absolutely possible.

            • #92973
              Anonymous
              Guest

              The entire milky way is an insane 100,000 light years across. Our closest stars are several light years away. You are just dumb. Interstellar travel is absolutely impossible.

              • #92975
                Anonymous
                Guest

                >people can’t spend a couple years in a space ship.
                Thank god I’m not as dumb as you fools

                • #92978
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  i remember when flaming used to mean something

                • #92979
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  Not the guy you’re responding too, but the issue it seems is when going from one end of the galaxy to the other takes literal centuries (with current tech), it’s not about a few years at that point.
                  Either we need to figure out faster travel, more durable and longer living bodies, or generational spaceships where descendants carry on the mission.

                  • #92982
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    No the stupid scrotebrain thinks interstellar travel even to the closet stars is impossible. Besides, if you have the tech to get to neighboring stars you have the tech to eventually get anywhere in the galaxy. It may just take a couple hundred thousand years to do.

                  • #92989
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    >Not the guy you’re responding too, but the issue it seems is when going from one end of the galaxy to the other takes literal centuries (with current tech)
                    No literal centuries wouldn’t be enough to the nearest star. It would be millennia. And that’s just extrapolating the velocity. We don’t possess any technology that lasts even nearly this long.

                    • #92992
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      >everyone knows its impossble to travel more then a hundredth the speed of light.
                      Anyone else think the scrotebrains on this site are getting even more scrotebrained?

                      • #92994
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Yeah people resort to greentexting and namecalling instead of providing arguments. Oh wait.

                      • #92997
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Why would I spend time arguing with halfwits like you when basically every scientist on the planet disagrees with you? freaking morons geez.

                    • #93017
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      There’s no paradox, Humans are barely preteens in terms of technology.

                      We only figured out radio 125 years ago. Meaning the maximum extent of our radio broadcasts is only 120 ly at most. We have no idea what aliens would build, how they would communicate, what they would be capable of. We have no idea of what are the roadblocks for life to arise, we have no idea how common or rare it is, we have no idea whether we have detected aliens already (Wow signal, Tabby’s Star, ‘Oumuamua and so on) or not.

                      Proclaiming we are alone or that there are no signs of life and thus we are in a "paradox" is stupid when we are still fumbling in the dark. To continue the previous analogy we are a 12 year old kid thinking he has life all figured out.

                      Breakthrough Starshot is planning to go to Alpha Centauri in 20 to 30 years, scrotebrain. And this is an ongoing project we are carrying out with current technology. We will see video footage of Alpha Centauri in our lifetime.

                      Why are you posting in a science board if you are so clueless about the topic? Just to flaunt about what a scrotebrained shitstain you are?

                • #92984
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  people can’t even wear a mask for couple of months

                  • #92988
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    this is the dumbest response I’ve read in freaking months, I don’t even know where to begin or if it’s worth the time to break down how stupid this is

                    • #93095
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      Its not, its spot on

                • #93149
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  We are talking about hundreds of thousands or even millions of years.
                  What kind of spaceship could survive all this time?

          • #92974
            Anonymous
            Guest

            The issue isn’t distance, at least for the closest star systems. It’s space radiation. We don’t have the materials to withstand whatever it is outside the Oort cloud. Cryosleep is theoretically possible and people could be sent 5 lightyears away at half the speed of light a few hundred years from now

            this is solved by

            Transferring/copying our minds into robotic immortal minds/bodies. Or hybridizing with AI

            Seems like the most feasible between creating a robot body vs creating everlasting bio bodies. I Guess another solution would be to constantly replace organs and body parts with homegrown vat organs to constantly stay young/healthy.
            I’m not to sure which one is closer to being realized or feasible for long term space travel and all the issues that come with it.

          • #92980
            Anonymous
            Guest

            I’ll be laughed at for this, but I unironically believe that God wouldn’t have made a universe this huge without some sort of physical mechanism that allows getting around it in a reasonable amount of time.

            • #92983
              Anonymous
              Guest

              It’d be even funnier if he did make it this huge but intentionally made it impossible to get around as a joke to fuck with all intelligent life.
              Sort’ve like the Sims thing where you remove the ladder from the pool so they can’t get out, but on an intergalactic scale.

      • #92999
        Anonymous
        Guest
        • #93001
          Anonymous
          Guest

          The digits…

        • #93002
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >How do ufo engines work?
          >Mystical mumbo-jumbo!
          Thanks, Satan.

          • #93005
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >all points in time and space are connected

            • #93008
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >How do we get to the stars?

              >YOU ARE ALREADY BEYOND THE STARS!

      • #93049
        Anonymous
        Guest
        • #93054
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >which is feasible with technology we have today
          Come again?

          • #93055
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Using current technology and a few trillion dollars, we could easily build a spacecraft and accelerate it to 1% the speed of light.

            • #93057
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Using what technology?

              • #93059
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Nuclear is one candidate.

                • #93063
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  Anon, Voyager is going 17km/s, which is less than 1% of 1% of the speed of light, and we got there by exploiting a crazy alignement of planets to sligshot as fast as possible out of the solar system
                  And now you’re telling me we had it all figured out, if only we used "Nuclear"? Damn, where is your nobel price?

                  • #93065
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    >Anon, Voyager is going 17km/s, which is less than 1% of 1% of the speed of light,
                    Is it powered by nuclear power? No.
                    >And now you’re telling me we had it all figured out, if only we used "Nuclear"? Damn, where is your nobel price?
                    I’m not the one who did the calculations for that. Smarter people than me figured out that accelerating to those speeds is possible using nuclear power. Maybe even as fast as 0.3c.

                    • #93066
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      you know nuclear works by just heating water right?

                      • #93067
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Make a few nukes go boom behind your space shuttle and you easily accelerate to significant portions of c.

                      • #93070
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        controlled explosions are already what we use

                      • #93069
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        That’s steam anon

                      • #93162
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        isn’t steam water in vapor form
                        so technically water

                    • #93068
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      >Is it powered by nuclear power? No.
                      It actually is you dunce
                      >Smarter people than me figured out that accelerating to those speeds is possible using nuclear power. Maybe even as fast as 0.3c.
                      Is that also part of your headcanon or are you actually post links to those papers?

                      • #93071
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Orion_(nuclear_propulsion)

                        controlled explosions are already what we use

                        We use chemical ones to get off the ground. What I’m proposing is firing off nukes in outer space.

                      • #93075
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Footfall is a fairly mediocre novel but the finale where they launch their secret Project Orion ship and try to ram it into the alien mothership is Mass Effect 2 finale levels of hype

                      • #93082
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >project orion
                        That’s not current technology though. We don’t even know if it’s actually viable, as people had some doubt if pusher plates could actually resist impacts from close range nuclear explosions long enough to reach a meaningfull velocity, but the project was axed before we could test that.
                        It’s like saying we could use antimatter since we know it exists. It doesn’t mean it’s "current technology".

                      • #93084
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >That’s not current technology though.
                        It is. All you need is a lot of money to fund it.

                      • #93085
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >comparing pusher plates to anti-matter
                        That’s dumb as fuck.

                      • #93087
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Iirc, the engineering stresses have been worked out and it’s 100% doable with current technology but would require the ship to be like a kilometer tall and be composed mostly of shock absorbers.
                        The pusher plate doesn’t even have to be that strong, a really thick piece of steel coated in grease would work.
                        Unfortunately, building the ship would likely bankrupt any single country so would require a massive international effort and anything using nukes, especially nukes in space, is never going to get greenlit these days.

            • #93062
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Too bad 1% of the speed of light does absolutely nothing for us

              • #93064
                Anonymous
                Guest

                It does nothing for us. For virtually immortal beings, that speed is high enough to colonize an entire galaxy in 10 million years. They don’t even need to leave their home star.

    • #92956
      Anonymous
      Guest

      it debunks the current cosmological model

      • #92960
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I think this is the Occam’s razor answer honestly. We either have a completely incorrect view of the universe or at least are missing some important piece of the puzzle

        • #93011
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Correct answer, the other explanations are very unlikely because of how old and huge the universe is. There would be an endless of possibilities where life could form. Most simplest and most likely explanation is that our current cosmological model is flawed but this will never happen with the amount of worship we have in science and unwillingness to change

      • #93118
        Anonymous
        Guest

        This.

    • #92958
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Space is vast and old, and Intelligent life is common. The problem is that life rarely pops up near other life at the right time. So life mostly goes on thinking it is alone. The cosmos is one vast graveyard of civilizations.

      • #92962
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Intelligent life is common
        no it isnt

        • #92964
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Cetaceans are sapient. So intelligence arose on earth multiple times through different evolutionary paths.

          • #92965
            Anonymous
            Guest

            if your talking about intelligent life being common in the context of the fermi paradox you are implying ayys, not minke whales, which incidentally are delicious

            • #92993
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >minke whales, which incidentally are delicious
              So are human children, though.

              • #92995
                Anonymous
                Guest

                i always wanted to visit cambodia

              • #92996
                Anonymous
                Guest

                reptilian hands typed this post

      • #93143
        Anonymous
        Guest

        this, there have been other creatures that pondered their own version of the "fermi paradox", even right here in the Milky Way, but it was many millions of years ago, and in the future in some other part of the galaxy there will be others who reach this transient stage of evolution and will ponder the same things

    • #92961
      Anonymous
      Guest

      the simulation is consciousness woke af, everything outside of the milky way is simply a projection

    • #92966
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Waifu/SexBots.
      Give all boys and men a simple outlet for both their physical and emotional needs without having to waste time playing the game.
      Essentially a society of men constantly in 24/7 post-nut clarity state.
      Shit will get done quick and fast.
      All I wanna do is travel and explore the stars with my AI waifu and not have whores try to deter it with diversity/woke nonsense.

    • #92969
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Transferring/copying our minds into robotic immortal minds/bodies. Or hybridizing with AI

    • #92976
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >Kurzgesagt

    • #92986
      Anonymous
      Guest

      It’s never aliens.

      We might be seeing evidence of alien life all around us. However, nothing involving them is replicable, so we ignore it.

      The alien hypothesis is the exact same thing as the God hypothesis. It ends all scientific inquiry, as soon as you accept it as an explanation for anything you’re observing. When quasars were first detected, some people thought they could be exhaust signatures from nearby alien spacecraft. Had we accepted that hypothesis, we would have lost out on over 40 years of learning about them, because there’s nothing more to learn about aliens and their vehicles until they come down and explain them to us.

      Science depends on us dismissing any evidence of aliens until they come here, meet up with our scientists, and start explaining shit.

    • #92987
      Anonymous
      Guest

      it’s really simple: aliens don’t exist until it’s proven

    • #92991
      Anonymous
      Guest

      There is no paradox.

      They’re here.

    • #93009
      Anonymous
      Guest

      https://i.imgur.com/OfGCLEM.gif

      Life may be somewhat common but intelligent life is incredibly rare. We’re the first time it’s coming into the galaxy*

      *Except this is a simulation being made by beings trying to look at various scenarios in their past, similar to pic related.

    • #93013
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >NOOOOOOOOOOOOO, NOT MY SCIENCE FICTIOREENOS

    • #93016
      Anonymous
      Guest

      gay

    • #93029
      Anonymous
      Guest

      But are there any real, serious and objective researches being done to achieve FTL technology? If yes, then by who?

    • #93037
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Okay question, if an asteroid was hurtling towards Earth big enough to wipe us out, would we be able to with current tech/weaponry be able to at least adjust it’s trajectory or break it apart or even stop it?

      • #93039
        Anonymous
        Guest

        depend the time frame, less than 20 years, we would probably be bonked

        • #93044
          Anonymous
          Guest

          how far away would we even notice an asteroid coming at us , before or after Pluto

    • #93040
      Anonymous
      Guest

      If life was destined to become sentient and intelligent, why couldn’t dinosaurs achieve it? They had much more time than we

      • #93050
        Anonymous
        Guest

        See this poster’s hypothesis

        because they ruled the earth for longer than they have been extinct
        advanced intelligence was clearly not needed to be on top of the food chain

        Maybe some species of dinosaur eventually would have, maybe no specie would have gotten the necessary evolutionary kick in the nuts
        Maybe reptilians just aren’t prone to the mutations necessary for the development of intelligence; after all, crocodilians survived the giant meteor, and they are no closer to developing tool use than they were 95 million years ago, and the evolution of the surviving dinosaurs led them to become flying birds rather than tool-using land-dwelling "primates"
        If the giant meteor didn’t level the playing field, who knows what could have happened?

        • #93053
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >If the giant meteor didn’t level the playing field, who knows what could have happened?
          There was likely no evolutionary pressure for intelligence.

          • #93058
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Why not?
            Dinosaurs were not all giant creatures who doesnt afraid of anything
            Some were small, preyed upon, and at the bottom of the pecking order, just like us lemurs/primates were
            They might have turned to highly social behavior and tool use for common survival, just like us

      • #93119
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Why do you think they lacked intelligence?

    • #93042
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Combination of rare earth hypothesis, rare life hypothesis and rare technological civilisation hypothesis. In conclusion, we are alone.

    • #93048
      Anonymous
      Guest

      What kind of scrote creates universe and then nerfs it with light speed baka

    • #93056
      Anonymous
      Guest

      > muh space Paradox
      > muh life n aliens n’ sheeit

      can these mutt midwits never stop with this nonsense

    • #93072
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Isn’t it true that you can travel arbitrarily fast by accelerating to close to the speed of light? Like, if you want your 1000 light year journey to take 10 years, then you accelerate to 0.9999 the speed of light, and if you want it to take 10 minutes then you accelerate to 0.9999999999 the speed of light. I made the numbers up but you get the point. The challenge is getting to that speed of course, and everyone you know will have died by the time you get there, but my point is that you can get there arbitrarily fast.

      • #93073
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Past a certain speed you will travel so fast that hitting even some space dust will obliterate your ship.

        • #93076
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Easy, just anchor a shield composed of negative mass in front of your ship and it will repel any sources of positive mass away from it

          • #93077
            Anonymous
            Guest

            We’re not even sure negative mass exists (the only good candidate is dark energy) and if it does it will create lots of other issues. Besides, you can’t stop a ship propelled by negative mass.

            • #93079
              Anonymous
              Guest

              How about a really powerful magnetic field around the craft?

              • #93080
                Anonymous
                Guest

                What if the space dust isn’t affected by magnetism?

                • #93086
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  A strong enough electric field could ionize the dust?

            • #93081
              Anonymous
              Guest

              You can put a solar sail on the front to deploy and have it slow itself down while reaching destination.

          • #93083
            Anonymous
            Guest

            We’re not even sure negative mass exists (the only good candidate is dark energy) and if it does it will create lots of other issues. Besides, you can’t stop a ship propelled by negative mass.

            No, we are pretty sure nohing like negative mass exists
            Of the many theories about what dark energy could be, negative mass is at the very bottom, as theoretical mathematics

            • #93088
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Technically speaking, all the matter in our universe could be negative from the perspective of a different universe composed entirely of "positive" matter

              • #93089
                Anonymous
                Guest

                There’s nothing in our universe suggesting stuf like "a different universe" and "anti-sign mass" exists
                TECHNICALLY SPEAKING the visible universe could be a bubble in a trillion light years wide pool of dragon shit, but it’s not very likely

                • #93090
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  Negative energy states can be induced (Casimir effect, black hole radiation), which suggests that negative mass be be theoretically possible under certain extreme conditions

                  • #93091
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    How is black hole radiation (which for now is just a theoretical application of a theoretical field) a negative energy state?
                    I admit I don’t know enough about the math behind the Casimir effect, but I don’t think it’s a negative energy state, not anymore than any other attractive force is

        • #93078
          Anonymous
          Guest

          To be fair, if we are talking accelerating to 0.9999999999c we would be at a level of technology where we could also push a black hole in front of us as a shield.

      • #93120
        Anonymous
        Guest

        You get it right.

        Past a certain speed you will travel so fast that hitting even some space dust will obliterate your ship.

        >Past a certain speed
        Speed relative to what? There’s no space dust which already travels at that speed relative to Earth?

    • #93092
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Why go out and explore other worlds when staying in and exploring virtual worlds is safer?

      • #93093
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Pretty comfy to be honest
        Sign me up for eternal bliss
        …Wait, was I supposed to feel bad for the pod people?

        • #93094
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >I supposed to feel bad for the pod people?

          When I get old and my body hurts, then the pod life look pretty sweet to me.

        • #93100
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >Sign me up for eternal bliss
          Until the dopamine tolerance kicks in and you realize its boring as fuck in the room and now nothing you were interested in before is exciting either.
          I would rather go the VR route. Life doesn’t have to be perpetually blissful, just interesting and enjoyable more often then not.

    • #93096
      GODly
      Guest

      I killed all the aliens.

      • #93097
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Simple – advanced civilizations develop tech that is small and efficient enough to not stick out. This would be the natural course of development even without reasons to stay stealthy like this guy

    • #93098
      Anonymous
      Guest

      IMO, they just don’t care. It’s like you see an ant for the first time, you think it’s cool, you search and find another and then another and then you stop because they are boring.

    • #93101
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >assume life must be common in universe
      >can’t find any outside earth
      >muh paradox
      have you considered your assumption might be wrong?

    • #93102
      Anonymous
      Guest

      It’s not really a paradox but lets look at reasons for the galaxy not being "colonized"
      1. We haven’t even really looked
      2. Intelligent life is very rare
      3. Moores law is not an actual law and there are hard limits to physics and technology
      4. Space is extremely hostile to life and stars have a limited life- seriously what are we gonna do when our sun swells and boils off the oceans?

      • #93103
        Anonymous
        Guest

        #3 isn’t really applicable. There’s no new tech innovations we really need to travel the stars. Slow, but doable.
        #4 is in 5 billion years from now. Either we are extinct as the dinosaurs or we have long since left the planet

        • #93104
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Woke af brainlet
          Everything proposed about interstellar travel is theoretical, we need a lot more resources, new materials and processing power to develop them into reality
          5 billion years from now is the projected death of the Sun, it will render Earth inhabitable much sooner – some say that it would boil the oceans away as "soon" as 1 by from now (granted, this is still a shitload of time to get our shit together)

    • #93105
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Quarantine. Ayy lmaos filter out all forms of artificially generated energy sources so developing worlds can develop without outside influence.

    • #93107
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Space travel among two livable planets is impossible. It is possible to colonize without invasion

    • #93109
      Anonymous
      Guest

      For LULZ in particular it has to be something about earth having been created 5000
      years ago, and currently enclosed in a glass bowl.

      Outside LULZ, where informed people live, it
      depends on something like the what
      values to assign to the unknowns in the Drake
      equation.

    • #93110
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >What is LULZ‘s answer to the Fermi Paradox?
      We have absolutely zero ability to detect aliens.
      Our lack of having detected them means absolutely nothing.

      To follow: Things I’ve posted before on the subject.

      • #93111
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Using Earth as an example, life has been around for up to 4 billion years, and we’ve got a billion to go before the sun heats up enough to evaporate all surface water on Earth.
        If we count 4 billion years ago as "zero":
        3,460 million years fall into Pre-Cambrian times: 69.2%
        289 million years for the Paleozoic: 5.8%
        186 million years for the Mesozoic: 3.7% (Dinosaur Times)
        66 million years bring us up to the present: 1.3%
        Of that, homo sapiens have been here 300,000 years, and we were all hunter-gatherers until about 12,000 years ago.

        There’s another 20% we haven’t seen yet.
        No telling how long humans will last, and a single planet is an awfully small sample size, but if we’re typical we get dinosaurs on less than 4% of the planets,
        human-like folk on 0.00006% plus a percentage woke af on however much time we’ve got left, up to 20% if we last another billion years (seems super unlikely).

        • #93113
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Any "great filter" hypothesis is a solution in search of a problem.
          The galaxy _could_ be teeming with life, but unless they manage to come here, and then decide to announce their presence, and have made that announcement recently enough not to be recorded as gods, demons or angels, we’d never know.
          Let’s break down the numbers (allow for rounding). Say a million alien expeditions have reached Earth intent on letting us know we’re not alone.
          This isn’t counting any kind of clandestine surveillance, or something subtle enough that we wouldn’t notice.
          The Earth’s been here 4.6 billion years, that’s a visit every 4600 years.
          OK, the very first 130,435 visits happen during the Hadean, before the oldest probable microfossils were formed.
          The first 882,391 visits happen in pre-Cambrian times, before the formation of complex life forms, meaning less than 12 percent of our visitors would find anything more "modern" than trilobites.
          The next 50,760 visits happen during the Paleozoic, still not recent enough for them to find dinosaurs.
          Then 40,413 more visits before the Chicxulub impact kills the dinosaurs.
          Of the 14,348 visits since then, only 565 would find stone tools or better, only 43 would meet Homo Sapiens, and (with rounding) only one would have arrived since cuneiform writing was invented.

          There’s no need to "explain" the lack of visitors in the last few hundred years.

    • #93112
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Globohomo is incapable of developing an interstellar civilization, so there’s no galactic globohomo which is interested to interfere with our affairs.

      • #93114
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >no galactic globohomo which is interested to interfere with our affairs.
        OR…
        Because not all environments are suitable to all species.
        We maybe haven’t been colonized because:
        a) advanced societies don’t reproduce like locusts.
        b) even if they do, Earth’s gravity, existing life, solar flux, tides, the color of the sky, etc, etc might not make Earth an ideal home for whatever species dominates this part of the galaxy.
        c) they might not want to wipe out indigenous life
        and/or:
        d) they were here already, and life on Earth , or maybe the Cambrian explosion are the result of their presence
        And let’s not forget the vastness of time itself. `
        Nothing lasts forever.
        If intelligent, tool-bearing, interstellar space-faring species only last for tens of millions of years, while planets enjoy goldilocks status for billions of years, then 99% of all potential space empires don’t exist at any given moment.

    • #93115
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The Fermi "paradox" is pure hubris.
      There are dozens of explanations that don’t involve aliens "hiding", but even running through them implies we are advanced enough to notice aliens at all.
      We’ve never looked anywhere besides our own solar system, and even there we’ve barely peeked under the first rock or two.
      We can’t receive radio signals similar to our own at interstellar distances (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermi_paradox#We_are_not_listening_properly).
      The Earth has been here for 4.6 billion years, but we’ve only been writing stuff down (recorded history) for 6-7 thousand years.
      During most of that time we would have remembered an alien visit as gods descending from the heavens.
      But somehow, because aliens haven’t showed their faces in the last 2-300 years (0.0000066% of the time the Earth has been here), we must surely be alone, because our exact moment in history is just that freaking important.

    • #93116
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Threads like this tell me that nobody on LULZ is actually a scientist. There is a lot of actual discussion of Fermi Paradox modelling that you all could be discussing instead of this LULZ-tier dreck. A paper that made significant waves in the field recently is:

      https://arxiv.org/abs/1806.02404

      • #93124
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Round the bong, naval-gazing speculation is neat and all, but it’s all unfalsifiable because:

        >What is LULZ‘s answer to the Fermi Paradox?
        We have absolutely zero ability to detect aliens.
        Our lack of having detected them means absolutely nothing.

        To follow: Things I’ve posted before on the subject.

        >We have absolutely zero ability to detect aliens.

    • #93122
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Life exists but it’s so radically different to us we can’t easily recognize it as alive.

    • #93123
      Anonymous
      Guest

      God didn’t create aliens

    • #93126
      Anonymous
      Guest

      THE freaking EARTH AND LIFE WERE CREATED
      IT’S REALLY THAT SIMPLE
      IT’S AMAZING HOW MANY "HARD PROBLEMS" AND "PARADOXES" DISAPEAR WHEN YOU REALIZE THAT GOD CREATED THE FLAT AND STATIONARY EARTH AND THE FIRMAMENT ABOVE AS WELL AS ALL LIFE

    • #93127
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Large number of planets * Tiny probability of intelligent life = small probability of fellow intelligence.

      The chance of life is so absurdly small that even a universe isn’t big enough for it to be commonplace.

      Also as anons have said even if there were, our instrumentation isnt advanced or saturated enough to intercept the weak and deformed signals any potential ayylmaos might be making if they are so far away.

      • #93129
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Large number of planets * Tiny probability of intelligent life = small probability of fellow intelligence.
        >I cannot into math.

        • #93130
          Anonymous
          Guest

          His math checks out, tiny is a smaller small

          • #93131
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Big * Tiny = small???
            1e+6 * 1e-2 = 10,000
            Sorry, you’re both wrong, especially since not one person on Earth can validate what "tiny" means in actual numbers.
            For all you know, every golidlocks planet is teeming with life, and once intelligent life emerges, it typically lasts for an indefinitely long time, having control over its environment.
            Or not. NOBODY knows.

            • #93135
              Anonymous
              Guest

              and id just like to point out, your math sucks harder.
              being fair:

              10e6 * 10e-6 = 1

              btfo. earth is alone.

          • #93134
            Anonymous
            Guest

            das rite

            Big * Tiny = small???
            1e+6 * 1e-2 = 10,000
            Sorry, you’re both wrong, especially since not one person on Earth can validate what "tiny" means in actual numbers.
            For all you know, every golidlocks planet is teeming with life, and once intelligent life emerges, it typically lasts for an indefinitely long time, having control over its environment.
            Or not. NOBODY knows.

            freaking spakker

            Huge >> Large >> Small >> Tiny

            therefore large * tiny = small

            there really arent that many planets in the universe, even less that have liquid water and so on with the dependencies. the probabillity gets wayyy smaller than the number of candidate planets. its not even hard to think about, it doesnt require hard math its just obvious.

            • #93140
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Liquid water is extremely common, fucktard.

              • #93186
                Anonymous
                Guest

                no its not. we are the only planet in the solar system with it, we are the only planet where its medium enough to not freeze or be steam. the margin of orbit for liquid water is extremely tight, and so are the thousand other properties of earth which make it habitable, such as the gravity and the other chemical properties like the atmospheric content and the lack of saturated biohazardous materials. the earth is a total freak of nature.

                • #93190
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  Planet yes.
                  But most liquid water in the solar system is probably not on Earth.
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extraterrestrial_liquid_water
                  >the earth is a total freak of nature.
                  Within our own solar system. Write back when we have a few other systems to check on.

                  • #93193
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    Educate yourself before you open your mouth. The earth is a complete freak of nature.

                    So’s our star, btw.

                    And our star system is rare as well, btw.

                    • #93200
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      Why are you spreading misinformation, you pseud? There is nothing unusual about the Sun.

                      3.5% of all stars in the Milky Way are Class G stars like Sol. That’s roughly 3.5 billion to 14 billion stars like the Sun in the Milky Way alone.

                      And this is not getting into the concept of superhabitability, since other stars (like K type) are both more numerous and considered better suited for life.

                      As for how rare the Earth is, we have no idea since we can barely detect exoplanets woke af on transits. It’s probably rare. The disposition of our solar system seems unusual. But you are making a lot of assumptions about things you are clearly clueless about.

                      • #93208
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        The sun is 50% less active than other G stars, scrotebrain. That’s what makes it rare.

                        >As for how rare the Earth is, we have no idea
                        STFU! Kepler was built from the ground up to detect earthlike planets and it found ONE.

                        The earth is in a rare habitable zone
                        The earth has an extremely rare moon (that came about as a result of a collision with another planet, thus our moon being massive compared to most other moons)
                        The earth has PLATE TECTONICS which is extremely rare for rocky planets

                        Again, EDUCATE YOURSELF BEFORE YOU OPEN YOUR MOUTH!.

                      • #93212
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        dont forget also that the earth has an active plasmoid in its centre which creates a magnetosphere to protect it from cosmic rays.

                      • #93213
                        Anonymous
                        Guest
                      • #93214
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >EDUCATE YOURSELF BEFORE YOU OPEN YOUR MOUTH!.
                        Wow, somebody needs to get laid.

                        See also: One pop-sci article (you couldn’t even be bothered to link), isn’t an "education".

                      • #93217
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        You are talking out of your ass.
                        There’s no way we could detect plate tectonics in exoplanets, just like we can’t detect their atmosphere. We can barely calculate their mass.
                        We don’t know how rare or common it is to have planets in the habitable zone for a star. We also don’t know how a large satellite would prove necessary to the development of life (tidal pools facilitating the development of prebiotic molecules is just a theory)
                        We also don’t know if a more active star would inhibit the development of life, after all an exo-Earth could have a magnetosphere to protect it, just like we have.
                        We don’t know anything but you spout bullshit like you did.

                      • #93223
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >We don’t know anything
                        We know plenty, you’re just a scrotebrained popsci kid who wants to believe in bullshit that scifi movies fed you. We are the only intelligent life for billions of light years in every which way.

                        Aliens shit is >>>/x/

                        not science or math.

                        GTF BACK THERE!

                      • #93231
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >We are the only intelligent life for billions of light years in every which way.
                        [citation needed]
                        Hundreds of billion of stars in our own ~100 ly diameter galaxy.
                        How many of those have you checked for life?

                      • #93218
                        Anonymous
                        Guest
                      • #93226
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Great b8 m8. Nobody could possibly be this much of a walking popsci reddit stereotype.

                        I almost fell for it but the typing of "plate tectonics" in all caps seals it for me.

                      • #93242
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Why are you spreading misinformation, you pseud? There is nothing unusual about the Sun.

                        3.5% of all stars in the Milky Way are Class G stars like Sol. That’s roughly 3.5 billion to 14 billion stars like the Sun in the Milky Way alone.

                        And this is not getting into the concept of superhabitability, since other stars (like K type) are both more numerous and considered better suited for life.

                        As for how rare the Earth is, we have no idea since we can barely detect exoplanets woke af on transits. It’s probably rare. The disposition of our solar system seems unusual. But you are making a lot of assumptions about things you are clearly clueless about.

                        *Don’t forget Jupiter’s gravity well which helps deflect us from collisions

                        *Don’t forget Earth’s magnetosphere

                        *Don’t forget that "superhabitable" star systems would also attract more space debris and increase the likelihood of a high velocity impact event on any hypothetical Earth-like planet

                        *Don’t forget that Earth-like planets near red dwarf stars are usually tidally locked because of their close proximity

                        *Don’t forget that red dwarf stars are magnetically unstable and regularly produce CME’s large enough to strip atmospheres from nearby planets/spray them with life-ending amounts of radiation

                        … Not saying the rare earth hypothesis is correct, just saying it isn’t unfounded. I personally HOPE it’s incorrect; the universe would be a lonely place if it were just us here.

                      • #93243
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >the universe would be a lonely place if it were just us here.
                        Don’t worry, the number of stars in just this galaxy almost certainly assure that we’re not alone.
                        But then again, the challenges of interstellar travel make it super unlikely we’ll ever meet our neighbors.
                        It’s almost like the universe is a purpose-built zoo.

                      • #93244
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        There’s always a possibility of being the "progenitor race". The universe is, in fact, quite young.

                      • #93246
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >*Don’t forget Jupiter’s gravity well which helps deflect us from collisions
                        I acknowledged our star system has an unusual arrangement

                        >*Don’t forget Earth’s magnetosphere
                        Venus has a magnetosphere similar to Earth.
                        It’s not that rare. Furthermore, you could also have life on the satellites of gas giants, which would be protected by their parent’s magnetosphere. And tidal forces on those satellites could serve as sources of heat (tidal heating) as well. Many possibilities here

                        >*Don’t forget that "superhabitable" star systems would also attract more space debris and increase the likelihood of a high velocity impact event on any hypothetical Earth-like planet
                        That depends on how we define "superhabitable". The point of the theory of superhabitability, is that it’s the epitome of arrogance to believe that somehow we managed to evolve on the most suitable planet for life on the entire universe.
                        The point is that taking Earth as a gold standard for habitability may be wrong.

                        >*Don’t forget that Earth-like planets near red dwarf stars are usually tidally locked because of their close proximity
                        Yeah but that’s not a problem on Class K stars.

                        >*Don’t forget that red dwarf stars are magnetically unstable and regularly produce CME’s large enough to strip atmospheres from nearby planets/spray them with life-ending amounts of radiation
                        See above, not sure why you are replying with Class M star problems when I mentioned Class K stars.

                        >… Not saying the rare earth hypothesis is correct, just saying it isn’t unfounded. I personally HOPE it’s incorrect; the universe would be a lonely place if it were just us here.
                        Agreed. In fact I quite agree with Rare Earth hypothesis, just not with these reddit types that come here spouting popsci and edgy lines like "we are alone in the universe get it over with" and the like. Fact is we don’t know enough yet. To believe that there could be no life anywhere else is extremely arrogant, even assuming Rare Earth to be correct.

                    • #93201
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      >Educate yourself before you open your mouth. The earth is a complete freak of nature.

                      Planet yes.
                      But most liquid water in the solar system is probably not on Earth.
                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extraterrestrial_liquid_water
                      >the earth is a total freak of nature.
                      Within our own solar system. Write back when we have a few other systems to check on.

                      >Write back when we have a few other systems to check on.
                      We have no ability to check other solar systems for planetary oceans. That was my point.
                      Even our survey of exoplanets covers a VERY tiny fraction of the galaxy, and couldn’t possibly support the headline in you pop-sci article.

                      Here’s what we do know about possibly habitable exoplanets:
                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_potentially_habitable_exoplanets
                      That’s 60 "maybe"s, all but one within 2800 light years. And if memory serves, that’s mostly looking in one direction.

                • #93197
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  There’s evidence that were oceans on Venus, Mars and possibly Pluto in the past. Today, we are pretty sure there is liquid water on Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and possibly Ceres. All this on our little solar system.

                  As it pertains exoplanets, one of the most common types of exoplanet we’ve found is the so-called "Mini Neptune" or "Gas Dwarf" which are believed to be largely oceanic planets.

                  So what the fuck are you talking about?

                • #93199
                  Anonymous
                  Guest
    • #93133
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Earthers are so ugly that aliens avoid them. It’s like avoiding eye contact with an ugly girl.

    • #93136
      Anonymous
      Guest

      That there is no paradox.

    • #93137
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I think the biggest filter will end up being either intelligence or the existence of substantial amounts of fossil fuels and/or wood. A water planet is unlikely to develop fire, I’d think.

    • #93138
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Rare Earth hypothesis.

      Life and especially intelligent life is extremely rare. It’s quite obvious that life must be rare. The only question is that how rare it is and I’d say that the most realistic valuation is that it’s an impossibility that there are other intelligent and more advanced beings anywhere near us. If there exists such things, they’re likely that far away that we’ll simply never hear from each other. I personally believe that we are absolutely alone in this whole galaxy, there’s no simple life here either. This assumption is woke af on our current knowledge of abiogenesis and on Earth. I’d say that there’s a good possibility that we are the most advanced beings in the whole observable universe if life is limited to our biochemistry (which is possible and according to recent research, plausible).

      I don’t know, nobody does and perhaps never will. If I was a betting man, I’d bet that there’s simply no-one out there, I think it has the safest odds according to everything that we know so far.

      • #93144
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Rare Earth hypothesis.
        >hypothesis.
        In LULZence, a hypothesis should be testable.
        Get back to me when your idle speculation is subject to testing.

        Dark Forrest Theory

        >Dark Forrest Theory
        >Theory
        Oh, for fuck’s sake.

        ITT: pure science fiction.

        • #93146
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Futurist scrotes think they going to space.
          Nah you going to live and die on earth like everyone else you narcissistic cunts. Die in the freaking dirt. The universe is bigger than your fatass and humans are too scrotebrained for space, it takes light years to get to even another star. It would take centuries to go to even a nearby star that would just be lifeless rocks. Humans don’t even invest in repairing a freaking condo but they going to do interstellar travel lol. More like all the space money gets embezzled By corrupt idiots and the project is shuttered a few years in.

          >Guys my heckin dyson swarmers is can’t be found so aliens don’t exist
          Lol

          My guess is there probably aliens, but like they’re so far off it barely matters and most of it is slime. Maybe some Dinos if you’re lucky. Most of earth’s history was spent without “industrial civilization” yet the futurist scrotes think that shit will last for eons against entropy. freaking clowns have to beg and cry to AI daddy to make their shit function, it’s pathetic.

          • #93147
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >>Guys my heckin dyson swarmers is can’t be found so aliens don’t exist
            >Lol

            Wow, did you respond to the right post????
            Here in Virginia, it’s 4:16 am, and I’m drinking heavy, but even so, you seem irrational.
            How high are you?

            >dyson swarmers is can’t be found so aliens don’t exist
            See my earlier post:

            >What is LULZ‘s answer to the Fermi Paradox?
            We have absolutely zero ability to detect aliens.
            Our lack of having detected them means absolutely nothing.

            To follow: Things I’ve posted before on the subject.

            >We have absolutely zero ability to detect aliens.
            >Our lack of having detected them means absolutely nothing.

            • #93148
              Anonymous
              Guest

              It was another example of how futurists pretend their sci-fi is somehow scientific like Reddit forest is.

        • #93150
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >hates use of the words theory and hypothesis
          We’re reaching levels of pedantry that shouldn’t be possible

          • #93151
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Reddit forest is shit
            Just more “oh no they might heckin kill us” nonsense woke af on babby’s first game theory

          • #93175
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >>hates use of the words theory and hypothesis
            >understands the words theory and hypothesis in a scientific context
            FTFY

    • #93139
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Dark Forrest Theory

    • #93142
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The sun is a second generation star, one of the first stars to form with a system containing heavy elements for planets and life to form from.
      The Earth also developed life basically as quickly as it possibly could have.
      We are the ancient progenitor race.

    • #93145
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Whatever is the edgiest solution that panders to my fetishes and hatred of women.

    • #93153
      Anonymous
      Guest

      It’s not a paradox. The universe is so big, and life so rare, that the closest technologically advanced civilization to us is probably billions of light years away in a galaxy that no one will ever look at.

      There could literally be a type 3 civilization in a galaxy a billion light years away and we’d never, ever finally them unless we get extremely lucky and just happen to look in their direction.

      There are hundreds of billions of galaxies in the observable universe. Good luck.

    • #93158
      Anonymous
      Guest

      My answer is that at a certain point of development, every form of life in the universe becomes aware of the Fermi paradox and therefore doesn’t bother looking for other forms of life.
      I’m the only one in the universe this has occurred to, unfortunately. Ugh, I know, it’s tough being so brilliant sometimes.

    • #93170
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Intelligence is the great filter. Life is common in the universe.

      Intelligence is extremely rare.

      • #93171
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Life is common in the universe.
        prove it and prove you know exactly when the earth will stop being "habitable"

        • #93172
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >prove you know exactly when the earth will stop being "habitable"
          you are too low IQ to be replying to me.

          • #93173
            Anonymous
            Guest

            You could have just said the truth, that you have no proof, you claim just happens to be your favorite little cope.

      • #93174
        Anonymous
        Guest

        > Life is common in the universe.
        No proof, no model for it

        >Intelligence is extremely rare.
        No proof and no model either

        • #93254
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >No proof, no model for it
          please have a nice day creationist

    • #93176
      Anonymous
      Guest

      After two years of covid lockdowns do you think humanity will ever leave earth? Obviously not. We are filtered.

      • #93185
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Humanity has survived much, much worse than having to stay a few feet apart and wearing a surgical mask when in public.

        • #93187
          Anonymous
          Guest

          I think he means the common man is a mouth-breathing fool.
          Then again, the common man didn’t get us to the moon.

          • #93189
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >the common man didn’t get us to the moon.
            >implying

        • #93194
          Anonymous
          Guest

          I think he means the common man is a mouth-breathing fool.
          Then again, the common man didn’t get us to the moon.

          I mean the lockdowns and panic response resulting in a breakdown if society and all time high suicides. Add with the increased wealth disparity wherin literally everyone except the most wealthy became poorer from layoffs and inflation.

          Musk and maybe Bezos might colonize the stars, but everyone else on earth is becoming a feudal slave.

          Ironic that in science fiction most alien civilizations tend to be an authoritarian monarchy.

          • #93204
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >a breakdown if society
            Not even close.
            >all time high suicides
            Gonna need a source. You seem an unreliable source of information.
            So here’s what I found:
            https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/15/health/coronavirus-suicide-cdc.html
            >U.S. Suicides Declined Over All in 2020 but May Have Risen Among People of Color
            >Despite dire predictions, the number of suicides fell by 5 percent over all. Still, smaller
            >studies suggested the trends were much worse among nonwhite Americans.

            https://www.axios.com/suicide-decreased-in-2020-pandemmic-mental-health-26196eaf-a245-4d21-85eb-eeb864a24449.html
            >Suicides in the U.S. decreased in 2020, according to preliminary
            >data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
            >Critics of lockdowns and other coronavirus-prevention efforts have suggested throughout the
            >pandemic that those measures would drive the suicide rate higher. But that hasn’t happened.

    • #93191
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Problem with the paradox is that it is amorphous, and neutral. It requires no observers, and therefore our existence contradicts the paradox. Unless of course, we don’t exist either, in which case it also rendered moot.

      • #93196
        Anonymous
        Guest

        No the paradox is the equation suggests there should be many sentient civilizations within the nearest dozen Sol-like stars, but we haven’t observed them.

        The problem with this paradox is we would fail to detect our own civilization at 50ly due to signal attention.

        • #93210
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >No the paradox is the equation suggests
          If you mean the Drake equation, most of the numbers involved are complete unknowns, and we can’t use it to predict the number of neighbors we might have.

          >should be many sentient civilizations within the nearest dozen Sol-like stars, but we haven’t observed them.
          Because we have no means of observing them.
          "Mystery" solved.

          > we would fail to detect our own civilization at 50ly due to signal attention.
          Try 0.3ly.
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermi_paradox#Humans_have_not_listened_properly
          >SETI estimates, for instance, that with a radio telescope as sensitive as the
          >Arecibo Observatory, Earth’s television and radio broadcasts would only be
          >detectable at distances up to 0.3 light-years,
          This is dated, Arecibo is defunct, and the Chinese have a new radio telescope, 2.6 times the size (area), but I’m still doubtful we could detect radio traffic from the nearest stars.

    • #93202
      Anonymous
      Guest

      it exists right in front of us but in another state of matter we can’t interact with at all.
      carbon woke af life forms are the real anomaly.

    • #93219
      Anonymous
      Guest

      intelligent life is rare

    • #93222
      Anonymous
      Guest

      It’s science fiction speculation

    • #93240
      Anonymous
      Guest

      If, with respect to the earth life arose far away and relatively recently there is no reason to belive that we would be able to detect AYY’s even if they did exist.
      If you also consider the relatively rare conditions needed for life to arise and the even rarer event that said life would be intelligent, I don’t think it’s that strange.

    • #93249
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >What is LULZ‘s answer to the Fermi Paradox?
      Things are too far away and the universe is (probably) too young. Overthinking it gets you midwit responses about human society.

      • #93252
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Overthinking it also gets you the soi swarm memers going "my fake sci-fi big dumb object don’t exist therefore no aliens"

    • #93262
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Just because a self replicating molecule exists somewhere in the Universe, it doesn’t mean it needs to exist anywhere else.

    • #93263
      Anonymous
      Guest

      We need to at least get to the freaking 1nm wall of computing before we can even talk about anything else. There’s a staggering amount of compute performance left on the table as low hanging fruit that we haven’t yet captured and leveraged. We can talk about sci-fi shit after that.

    • #93264
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The great filter, which is just the aliens taking themselves out. Look at what’s happening on Earth. The West could have continued to explore space but ended up getting cozy and descending into nihilistic consumerism because it seemed like the most pleasurable option at the time. Now they’re just flushing their culture and even genes down the toilet by replacing their native populations with migrants. Whatever societies take the West’s place in the future will eventually go down the same path until one ends up launching the nukes on their way out and making sure no one else will ever have the chance.

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