Is technological development in decline?

Home Forums Science & tech Is technological development in decline?

Viewing 64 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #200660
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Is technological development in decline?

    • #200661
      Anonymous
      Guest

      No but the quality of your threads are.

    • #200662
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Everything is in decline.

      • #200669
        Anonymous
        Guest

        woke af and entropy pilled

      • #200685
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Woke af. Everything past 2006 is shit, we got bad even before 2008.

        […]

        Only because millennial-zers refuse to learn from their predecessors.
        I cannot believe a millennial who grew up in the 90s and 2000s is so incapable of emulating it.

        • #200717
          Anonymous
          Guest

          I also feel like 2008 was tipping point where technological development started slowing down.

      • #200686
        Anonymous
        Guest

        this

      • #200708
        Anonymous
        Guest

        The world really did end in 2012. We’re living in a nightmare.

      • #200730
        Anonymous
        Guest

        thanks to this sentence I realized everything and can’t stop screamingrh

      • #200851
        Anonymous
        Guest

        no: decline is on the rise

        • #200862
          Anonymous
          Guest

          fuck

      • #200859
        Anonymous
        Guest

        spbp

      • #200866
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I’ve heard the 80’s were a hard time

        • #200884
          Anonymous
          Guest

          It wasn’t too bad, most of it was fear of the unknown. The Soviet Union was menacing, and japan looked set to own the world. Reagan and Thatcher set the political themes and we got Cyberpunk as a response to the situation back then.

      • #200870
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Very spenglerian post no cap

      • #200910
        Anonymous
        Guest
        • #200912
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >But China
          I have some shocking news for you mai fren
          Also fuck patents

    • #200663
      Anonymous
      Guest

      What has been the biggest advancement since, the iPhone? Nothing major, jut faster smaller and better versions of what we already had.

      • #200664
        Anonymous
        Guest

        What’s with the shill campaign for this book?

        • #200665
          Anonymous
          Guest

          You’re right. I get paid peanuts to post Mark Fisher memes on an obscure technology board, because the dead author really wants your NEET bux

          • #200666
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Yes.

        • #200743
          Anonymous
          Guest

          It’s baby’s first anticapitalism book. Mark Fisher killed himself.

      • #200667
        Anonymous
        Guest

        The DS was unironically a bigger advancement than the iPhone.
        Smartphones are highly overrated.

        • #200668
          Anonymous
          Guest

          In 2021, how many people are walking around with a DS in their pocket?

          • #200670
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >universal appeal is the most important measure of technological achievement

            • #200672
              Anonymous
              Guest

              yes

          • #200693
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Way more than those who are walking around with an iphone 1.

            • #200879
              Anonymous
              Guest

              This kek

          • #200722
            Anonymous
            Guest

            In 2021, how many people have a nuclear reactor at home or have landed on the Moon?

        • #200704
          Anonymous
          Guest

          how lol?

      • #200682
        Anonymous
        Guest

        The iphone wasn’t a big advancement, just a faster, larger, "better" version of what we already had.

        • #200684
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >The iphone wasn’t a big advancement

          I’m the farthest thing from an apple lover but this simply ain’t true.Just the iPhone’s touch screen alone was at least two gens ahead of what everyone else had at the time. Pinch to zoom, multi touch input without the OS crawling to a halt, automatic screen rotation, useable mobile browser. iPhone announcement had every competitor worried for months

          • #200688
            Anonymous
            Guest

            being first to push out a touchscreen phone to the non-business market is hardly a freaking groundbreaking advancement. everyone I knew that had one said it was shit and a gimmick from the jump. can’t say I agree or disagree with them, cause I hate phones in general. saying the iphone was some groundbreaking achievement ignores how shit early "smartphones" were compared to their PDA predecessors. Sure, the "apple is hip" marketing train pushed other manufacturers to rush to copy apple, but by your logic the ipod was also a groundbreaking achievement. Maybe try pointing to some actual leaps forward in technology, or at least acknowledge the absurd rate that things are evolving now, instead of focusing on consoomer products.

            • #200748
              Anonymous
              Guest

              This

          • #200878
            Anonymous
            Guest

            LG did it first. The original iPhone was basically a dumbphone, and no one really cared about it. It wasn’t until the 3GS that it gained some notoriety.

        • #200774
          Anonymous
          Guest

          these aren’t mutually exclusive and it’s a pretty stupid post. The amount and type of people using an iphone era smartphone and what software and platforms they can use with it is vastly greater different than the blackberry or sidekick

      • #200695
        Anonymous
        Guest

        iscrote toys are the worst thing to happen to the planet. Worst than the death of Hitler and importing of scrotes into western countries combined.

        • #200861
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >Worst than
          idiot

      • #200700
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Blockchain. But also I’m sick of people’s lack of ability to zoom out. Rarely did revolutionary inventions become immediately recognised as great when they were actually invented. Also the iPhone is only good because it made technology accessible, not because it was technologically revolutionary.

        • #200707
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >Seethe and cope
          The iPhone caused a total paradigm shift. It redefined the phone and the rest of the industry fell in line. It also changed how we interact with ALL of our devices. There’s a reason why the Windows 11 start bar is in the middle by default, and it’s not because it looks cool.

        • #200905
          Anonymous
          Guest

          blockchain is from the 90 tho

      • #200711
        Anonymous
        Guest

        It was just a better version of LG Prada. Not the first touchscreen phone.

      • #200756
        Anonymous
        Guest

        The Tesla car, solar roof and power bank are the only real innovations in the last 10 years. And they all come from the same guy.

        • #200764
          Anonymous
          Guest

          And viable reusable rockets, elon musk will be known as the next steve jobs

        • #200893
          Anonymous
          Guest
      • #200810
        Anonymous
        Guest

        SpaceX. They literally just sent ordinary people into space. Have you been asleep iToddler?

        • #200858
          Anonymous
          Guest

          we sent people to the moon over 50 years ago friend. elon sending millionaires into upper atmosphere isn’t an advancement.

          • #200938
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >we sent people to the moon over 50 years ago
            >he doesn’t know

      • #200813
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Internet and the smartphone are the last iterations of guthenberg’s invention. Seems logical to me that there’s less and less way to make it better. Op is like a consoomer that stops using a program because the update frequency drops under a threshold.

      • #200829
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Neural net everything.

      • #200857
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Cheaper and less repairable versions too.

      • #200860
        Anonymous
        Guest

        php7

      • #200903
        Anonymous
        Guest
        • #200911
          Anonymous
          Guest

          it’s definitely interesting, but in the long run useless. It’s never gonna replace regular currency.

    • #200671
      Anonymous
      Guest

      https://i.imgur.com/1P9r0bO.gif

      We had a slight descent beginning in 2007 but we have made a total nosedive in terms on progression since the early 2010s (Windows 8/10,death of OSX, intel macs, Flat UI takeover, Javascript bloat everywhere, soulless hardware etc)

      • #200703
        Anonymous
        Guest

        The decline started around 1970. Compare the space race or the development of the Blackbird with the F-35, and you will see the massive decline we have had.

        Sure, we have some improvements but these are mostly incremental improvements over the previous generation. Compare that to the leaps of the 60’s, from U-2 to Blackbird, from artillery missiles to space rockets, from valves to transistors and integrated circuits and more.

        Yes. This is the era of stagnation.

        • #200710
          Anonymous
          Guest

          No it started in 2010

          • #200716
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Got a good argument to back up that one?

            It is because jet propulsion and airframe technology did reached an apex in the 1960s. Physics and economic realities caught-up. The only advances in aircraft since then have been electronic warfare and avionics. They are still evolving today.
            Sure, the SR-71 can fly faster and height than a F-35, but the SR-71 certainly cannot perform much of the functions that a F-35 and is much easier to fly.

            >It is because jet propulsion and airframe technology did reached an apex in the 1960s.
            True. And the nature of an apex is that there is a decline thereafter; the world did not sustain that peak. To wit: F-35 engines have major problems.
            >Physics and economic realities caught-up.
            It is a sign of our times that Lockheed Martin succeeded in financial engineering that made F-35 insanely expensive and impossible to stop.
            >The only advances in aircraft since then have been electronic warfare and avionics. They are still evolving today.
            Much of the avionics could have been retrofitted to F-16 and would have reduced project risk as the rest of the platform was proven.
            >Sure, the SR-71 can fly faster and height than a F-35, but the SR-71 certainly cannot perform much of the functions that a F-35 and is much easier to fly.
            My point is that Blackbird succeeded in a complex project and was very reliable and was never shot down. Had L-M gone for technological engineering rather than financial engineering, the F-35 would not have had the issues we see, such as regression in the radar software and major engine failure.

            • #200723
              Anonymous
              Guest

              I don’t use fighter jets but I could use a home robot and I should be able to buy one by now.
              Someone ought to make some robot muscles and get going what’s taking so long.

            • #200753
              Anonymous
              Guest

              SR-71 was not reliable, several units were lost to crashes and had a number of close calls. SR-71 was discontinued because cost, its primary mission evaporated. The Russians were about to develop new AA measures that would place SR-71 in danger.

              • #200769
                Anonymous
                Guest

                >SR-71 was not reliable, several units were lost to crashes and had a number of close calls.
                Was this beyond what one would expect during development? Calls may be close but they still pushed through.
                >SR-71 was discontinued because cost,
                People disagree about the reasons. And it is not as if cost was a problem before.
                >its primary mission evaporated.
                No, people cite satellites as good enough but forget to mention that orbits are very predictable. Some of the last missions were photographing Libya after the bombing and they wanted the results immediately. You can also get sharper images from 80000 feet than 1000 km altitude.
                >The Russians were about to develop new AA measures that would place SR-71 in danger.
                At the time of the Libyan missions they had missiles capable of about Mach 3. Brian Shul mentions they had to floor it, and without being specific he said he saw a new speed reading never seen before. They throttled back over Sicily but still overshot the tankers over Gibraltar.
                Top speed was set by the temperature of one single part of the engine. I expect 3 years of incremental improvements in metallurgy would allow them to make an update for extra speed.

                • #200789
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  Cost was a problem, you brainlet. The only reason we flew them is because we wanted to gather strategic intelligence from the Soviets between spy satellite orbits. That mission disappeared when USSR collapsed. There weren’t any other global powers that required constant intelligence gathering that couldn’t be met with satellites. SR-71 was a Cold-War artifact that lived and died with it. It is most likely its replacement will be an unmanned hypersonic aircraft once China starts to stretch its muscle around.
                  The problem wasn’t missile speed, it was range and radar/tracking getting good enough to coordinate a missile strike that speed alone wouldn’t help.

          • #200791
            Anonymous
            Guest

            the 70s date makes a great deal of sense sociologically and politically, as well as in the intiuitive sense of technological stagnation.
            noam chomsky identified the post-watergate inflitration and co-optation of the democratic party during the ford and carter administrations as the date when neoliberalism ended liberalism. (He also calls NIXON the last liberal president)

        • #200713
          Anonymous
          Guest

          It is because jet propulsion and airframe technology did reached an apex in the 1960s. Physics and economic realities caught-up. The only advances in aircraft since then have been electronic warfare and avionics. They are still evolving today.
          Sure, the SR-71 can fly faster and height than a F-35, but the SR-71 certainly cannot perform much of the functions that a F-35 and is much easier to fly.

          • #200720
            Anonymous
            Guest

            From Wright siss to 747 – 66 years
            From 747 to 737 max – 50 years
            Yeah, it’s not stagnation yet but civilization is slowing down at rapid pace.
            I blame the commies and USSR, after their demise burgeland like driving force of the world didn’t have to prove anyone anymore they’re better than commies so it turned in utter corrupt piece of shit without any plan or vision other than squeezing maximum profits from it’s populous.

            • #200727
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >Yeah, it’s not stagnation yet but civilization is slowing down at rapid pace.
              Well, isn’t that stagnation? We see more of the same, just nicer wrappings.

              I don’t use fighter jets but I could use a home robot and I should be able to buy one by now.
              Someone ought to make some robot muscles and get going what’s taking so long.

              In the 60’s we were promised cities on the moon, holidays on Mars, flying cars. All this would be commonplace in 2001. And ever since that people have shouted "Where is my jetpack!?" The Jetson’s was inspirational and every home should have a household robot. The only upgrade we have is Emmy the Robot, still a cartoon, plus Roomba.
              We do have some form of robot muscle beyond hydraulics but things are not really progressing much.

              • #200728
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Hot damn and it’s been 60 years since then

              • #200731
                Anonymous
                Guest

                I’m gen-x, other than smartphones and maybe drones and kids buzzing around on escooters I as a kid would be pretty disappointed with this lame gay ass future.
                Even my parents which are very old at this point say future is pretty disappointing compared to what they thought it would look like – as you said, rockets and outer world colonies.

            • #200754
              Anonymous
              Guest

              It is because we tapped out all of low-hanging fruit. Outside of a revolution, you aren’t going to see any rapid changes again. Hydrocarbons and cheap energy are the reason why technology progress and growth was so rapid in the last 200 years versus the previous 4000 years.
              Mastery of nuclear fusion might be ticket for the next big leap.

              • #200755
                Anonymous
                Guest

                no cope my dude
                Robots are low hanging fruit.

              • #200757
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Everything "big" today is from MOSFET.
                I agree on the premise: If a big new tech comes trough and brings a revolution, there will a ton of applications and replacing older techs as in the following decade.

                But still, there is a lot that can’t be done today since the backbone tech of lithium and silica both have limitations, as do lead acid.
                But can’t wait for carbon strings to become commonplace, and then get banned for the same problems Asbestos has.

                The Tesla car, solar roof and power bank are the only real innovations in the last 10 years. And they all come from the same guy.

                >power bank
                I still don’t get why nation grinds don’t invest into container sized lead acid setups for load balancing.
                It worked wonders for Australia’s questionable power grid, even if all it do is to give some leeway time on spinning up and down.

                • #200759
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  >still don’t get why nation grinds don’t invest into container sized lead acid setups
                  More expensive than lithium ion now.

              • #200758
                Anonymous
                Guest

                >Hydrocarbons and cheap energy are the reason why technology progress and growth was so rapid in the last 200 years versus the previous 4000 years.
                And as we can see with the coal crisis in India and China, and the natural gas crisis in Europe we’ve already exhausted most of our easy to get reserves.

                Electricity is gonna be much more expensive in the future so there will be less money for investments, particularly for renewables, and renewables themselves will grow more expensive since they rely a lot on oil and natural gas for their production.

                • #200807
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  >natural gas crisis in Europe

                  >We’ll not but natural gas from Russia cause Russia is bad, let’s destroy Nord Stream 2
                  >Let’s buy gas in tanks from USA
                  >Let’s build windmills and sunroofs, muh green energy
                  >OH SHIT IS THIS WINTER? OHNOO GAS PRICE TO THE MOON WHY???

                  • #200811
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    And everyone is too scared to use nuclear or actually put money towards better battery tech. Yeah we are bonked.

            • #200847
              Anonymous
              Guest

              787 is a way better "new shiny" to compare against the 747. Carbon Fiber Monocoque airframe, ultra-high bypass engines, ultra high compression engines. Practical uses of exotic metals like gamma-Titanium-Aluminium. Removal of hot air bleed systems. Massive windows, high cabin pressures, less noise through the airframe, longer range, ultra-high glide ratio.

              Theres a shit load of advancements in the 787 that we’ll see trickle down into other planes, the race is already on for even high bypass and even high compression engines.

              • #200850
                Anonymous
                Guest

                >787 is a way better "new shiny" to compare against the 747.
                Nobody denies it is better. That was never the issue raised and discussed in this thread. It is all about the rate of development. Read again what you responded to.

        • #200725
          Anonymous
          Guest

          gosh i wonder what could have happened

          • #200734
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >NOOOOOOOO NOT THE COMMUNIST PROPAGANDA AGAIN, YOU COMMUNISTS RUINED MY HECKIN GOOD CAPITALISMERINO

            • #200735
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Yeah either china or the United States are going to have to take one for the team and turn full blown communist.

          • #200788
            Anonymous
            Guest

            austrianscrotes are basically anarchists, and anarchy is indistinguishable from totalitarianism, and left-anarchy is indistinguishable from right-anarchy.

            long story short the austrianscrotes figured out that keynsianism could be very profitable for them, and ever since the distinction between government and "private sector" has been paper thin, if not nonexistent.

            at the same time the keynisans in government found that a pretense of ‘deregulation’ could be very profitable for them in terms of getting rid of pesky limits on government powers like the bill of rights (in terms of shaping public perception, not that "rule of law" has ever been an actual thing for the lawmakers)

          • #200806
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >Marx
            >government control
            Lol wut, picture made by someone who never read Marx.

            • #200823
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >transition period involving the revolutionary dictatorship of proletariat (i.e., government control)

              • #200825
                me
                Guest

                the main error of marxists was to assume that there can only be national-level governments or federations of national-level governments and nothing above, it’s a problem of 21st century’s government as such and not solely of dictatorship of the proletariat.

                • #200844
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  > surely utopianism isn’t the problem, its that only I know the real key to it

              • #200828
                Anonymous
                Guest

                it’s always interesting when commies don’t comprehend even the most fundamental tenets of their ideology

          • #200845
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Bluepilled. Right-wingers want a strong government to enable property empires while Left-wingers want the same government to disable them.

        • #200726
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Clueless

        • #200732
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >development of the Blackbird with the F-35
          One is mass produced so it could be fielded and fabricated in case of crippled infastructure during a possible WW3, the other is just a tech development project intended to keep a few aerospace military contracts alive
          And that even applies too…
          WW2 Germany, where some of the final products suffer from lack of field testing or refinement to boost durability, despite superior paper specs…. Essentially making them too expensive and fragile to deal with the actual war effort.

      • #200763
        Anonymous
        Guest

        There have been a lot of incremental advances but not very visible big ones. The latest and most controversial one being mRNA vaccines from work done in the 90s.

        What I think is happening is the complete disintegration of school systems and the family unit, this in turn churns out "scrotebrained" and easily manipulated people who lack formal education. A lot of people are falling through the cracks and even more are giving up on society altogether because society failed them. They have no means to create families of their own, own a home and hold good jobs. The consequence of this is that engineers, physicists and doctors, the people doing research are diminishing in numbers, and even blue collar jobs are having a hard time getting candidates.

        • #200786
          Anonymous
          Guest

          This is unfortunately true, I know some smart people without jobs because of the insane hoops required to participate in society. Stuff like this is a big reason why the younger generation is filled with so many doomers, what hope can they have really?

    • #200673
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >muh consoomer products aren’t getting any fancier
      >technology must be in decline

    • #200675
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Let’s hope not. I need a robot ai waifu yesterday

      • #200942
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Is technological development in decline?
        Now that we have established we are in a decline, how do we turn the ship around?

        Need also this.

    • #200677
      Anonymous
      Guest
    • #200678
      Anonymous
      Guest

      All innovation is going into big data psychological manipulation meme shit to make us into more profitable consumer cattle.

      • #200691
        Anonymous
        Guest

        this

      • #200947
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >tfw best and brightest STEMlords aren’t trying to put a man on Mars, cure cancer or solve the global energy crisis but instead writing advertising algorithms at scroteMAN

    • #200679
      Anonymous
      Guest

      ML has probably had the most rapid advancement in recent times of any field, and it’s all being used to extract money and attention from goyim.

    • #200680
      Scalar doll
      Guest

      Jinrui.

      • #200773
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Jinrui
        YKK is another one. Got more recommendations?

        • #200853
          Anonymous
          Guest

          SSR

        • #200863
          Anonymous
          Guest

          kabukimongatari

        • #200865
          Anonymous
          Guest

          YKK is perfect.

      • #200784
        Anonymous
        Guest

        jinrui sucks, especially the nonsensical time travel episodes
        the only thing i liked about it wass the OP

    • #200683
      Anonymous
      Guest

      a washing machine purchased twenty years ago is more likely to make it past 2040 than one purchased today.

      for my next phone, i’m strongly considering the phone i had before my current one.

    • #200689
      Anonymous
      Guest

      are you scrotebrained; RWA fucktard.

      Stop worshiping the past.

      Technology is still on the rise. Effective applications for machine learning are only increasing.

      Chip devs are finally catching onto big little design

      Chip fabs are moving out of China

      Rust has been created, a good first step for how a memory-safe language might be developed in the future.

      Honestly, the only thing you have to worry about is if you’re poor, cause the price of the everything as about to soar.

      • #200772
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Stop worshiping the past.
        Using a benchmark is hardly worshipping. Set your expectations right.
        >Technology is still on the rise.
        Did you read the thread before your had to hit the keyboard? Tech is rising incrementally more like the way dough rises. The big leaps are behind us.
        >Effective applications for machine learning are only increasing.
        … yet still not in a usable reliable fashion. Hype is high, products are lagging.
        >Chip devs are finally catching onto big little design
        Is this a breakthrough in your world??
        >Chip fabs are moving out of China
        The important ones were never there in the first place, TSMC and UMC are both in Taiwan.
        >Rust has been created, a good first step for how a memory-safe language might be developed in the future.
        If Rust is another of your milestones you set the threshold low, more like you buried deep underground.
        >Honestly, the only thing you have to worry about is if you’re poor, cause the price of the everything as about to soar.
        Is price rise is a benchmark you will easily be satisfied.

        • #200812
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Taiwan is part of China.

          • #200909
            Anonymous
            Guest

            fuck off, wu mao

    • #200690
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The mass adoption of social media turned technology from something that was supposed to empower it’s user to a tool of oppression and control. That’s the decline. Technology still develops, but not to benefit it’s user.

      • #200692
        Anonymous
        Guest

        This exactly.
        There is a reason elites are harping on about technology and muh fourth industrial revolution despite it appearing that technology has stagnated. It is about to turn into a full fledged tyranny, and they have the tech to do it now

        • #200916
          Anonymous
          Guest

          I hate that they’re making removal of tech from my life into a necessity, but they’re turning our own homes against us. It’s vile.

      • #200696
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Are you sure it’s a decline? Maybe civilisation is advanced if the puppet masters have better strings to pull society in the right direction.

    • #200694
      Anonymous
      Guest

      VR is pretty big and smart glasses. The tech is getting new stuff every second year. Next is eye tracking and dynamic focus screens.
      Tesla is going for batteries that are far cheaper and better than any other so far. They already got cheaper part done.
      Monitors, gpus, ram, cpus, ssds are so much better than 10 years ago. Even 5 years ago it’s a big difference in some of those.

      Tech is still moving ahead every year. New stuff coming out and research being done. It’s zoomers saying tech has stopped

    • #200697
      Anonymous
      Guest

      YOU are the product now OP, and you’ve made a lot of great advancements in terms of being profitable

    • #200698
      Anonymous
      Guest

      If anything it is consumer tech that is losing its "wow " factor which makes it seem to some that nothing is progressing as fast and is just getting a bit more polished. In many things there are diminishing returns as consumers reject the more advanced tech options.
      >bluray was technically ready for release just a few years after DVD launched, and even after it officially laucnhed in 2006 consumers didn’t feel it was worth the upgrade. 4K discs even less so
      >vinyl records are once again outselling CDs, and despite better audio formats existing than MP3 most consumers reject it
      >a 10 year old PC from 2011 can run any retail software and even most modern games. The same could not be said from a 1991 PC running 2001 software
      >travel back in time 20 years and show someone a PS5 compared to their new PS2 in 2001 and they will be mildly impressed, compared to showing a PS2 to someone in 1981 where it would look like space magic
      >OLED displays were featured in a 1993 issue of EGM maagzine, expecting we would have been gaming on them in only a few years when the price came down (still waiting)
      >consumers ignored 3D TVs, and now they are pressured to buy 4k tvs to watch their DVDs
      >VR was around in the early 1990s, just waiting for consumers to accept it (they didn’t)
      >very little innovation with smartphones or tablets since 2007, just mild refinement year after year
      >home theater and audiophile equipment is essentially the same its been for decades, adding a few new channels less than 1% of the population uses. 7.1 never caught on, if anything consumers regressed to stereo with a simple soundbar
      >cars have barely changed in the past 20 years (aside from niche electric market). style and performance remain mostly unchanged for past two decades when you used to see significant change every 5-8 years

      • #200712
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Vinyls outselling CDs
        It is physical media for music is pretty much dead. It is only die-hard audiophiles (SACDs/DVD-As and CDs) and nostalgia/hipsters (Vinyl) that keep it alive. The masses use their smartphone or basic digital media player for their music needs.

      • #200775
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >bluray was technically ready for release just a few years after DVD launched, and even after it officially laucnhed in 2006 consumers didn’t feel it was worth the upgrade. 4K discs even less so

        Bluray is a chicken and egg problem, not really a consumer reception problem. Why buy a bluray player if there aren’t many movies? Why release a bluray movie if there’s not a lot of players in households?

        People don’t give a shit about 4k disks because the disk part. On demand streaming is vastly more convenient. Yeah, 4k is hard to distinguish from 1080p at common viewing distances, but if it’s the same price consumers will buy it. We didn’t say no to cheap 4k tvs.

        >vinyl records are once again outselling CDs, and despite better audio formats existing than MP3 most consumers reject it

        Because vinyl’s competitor isn’t the CD, it’s digital streaming and download. Only boomers keep their antiquated format for sentimentality. A lot collect them but don’t play them, it’s like an adult baseball card. There’s also nothing audibly wrong with mp3.

        >consumers ignored 3D TVs, and now they are pressured to buy 4k tvs to watch their DVDs

        Because they still aren’t good enough, and it’s weird how you ignore a 4k tv as an example of consumers adopting superior technology. Also even boomers are finally streaming these days

        >VR was around in the early 1990s, just waiting for consumers to accept it (they didn’t)

        You know it sucked, come on now

        >style and performance remain mostly unchanged for past two decades when you used to see significant change every 5-8 years

        2011 you would be telling the truth but google 2001 car, you forgot what they look like

      • #200830
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I don’t agree on the cars one. They are starting to look pretty futuristic with all the light/led bars on them.

        • #200875
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >Muh LED’s
          Meanwhile nothing else has changed except cars become even harder to self repair and they all have the same flat design that looks like they were made by a first year engineering student in CAD.

          • #200876
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Don’t care, still looks scifi future.

            • #200937
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Thats the whole point
              It looks
              It is not

    • #200699
      Anonymous
      Guest

      No, its just a lull. There will be a war soon enough don’t you worry.

    • #200701
      Anonymous
      Guest

      they unironically don’t make em like they used to
      vintage electronics go for many times their original price because things produced today don’t come close in quality

    • #200702
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Since corporations and governments continue to appeal to the lowest, most hedious just because they are more exploitable and profitable, all things are going to slowly get more disfunctional, more prone to failure. "Craftman" products simply do not exist in technology anymore.
      Why do you think India, a nation of shit-flingers, stoamach cancer havers, short, ugly, who can bearly even speak english properly and are of moderate inteligence at best are the most sought-after market in the world?
      Capitalism has become a race to the bottom.

      The most technical and clever people work on mass manipulation and lobotomy, with the goal of selling less and less robust products that are produced by the most unqualified and thus exploitable people.

      Just think of the fact that being a scrote muslim chud disabled scrote is the highest qualification for most gigacorps.

    • #200705
      Anonymous
      Guest

      My life is in decline

      • #200706
        Anonymous
        Guest

        stream it, buddy.
        long live innovative streaming tech, not you.

      • #200762
        Anonymous
        Guest

        sorry dude, hope things get better

    • #200709
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Everyone passionate about tech is working on monolithic FOSS projects. Tech may be on decline for proprietary shit, but stuff like Proton, Godot and the software written for the Pinephone (as janky as they are) would have been unheard of back in the day.

      • #200737
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >stuff like Proton, Godot and the software written for the Pinephone (as janky as they are) would have been unheard of back in the day
        What about GNU and Linux you freaking scrotebrain?

      • #200803
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Idk it seems like FOSS is denying. Massive corporate backed chud subversion, Linus semi retiring, godawful dogshit security problems that proprietary software doesn’t have, reliance on corporate contributions, plummeting IQ and mental stability in free countries, etc. The future seems really grim.

        • #200918
          Anonymous
          Guest

          rent free

    • #200715
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >The Olduvai theory divides human history into three phases. The first "pre-industrial" phase stretches over most of human history when simple tools and weak machines limited economic growth. The second "industrial" phase encompasses modern industrial civilization where machines temporarily lift all limits to growth. The final "de-industrial" phase follows where industrial economies decline to a period of equilibrium with renewable resources and the natural environment.

    • #200718
      Anonymous
      Guest

      when will we have the technology to build pic related?

      • #200719
        Anonymous
        Guest

        People have discussed transporting hydrocarbons from the lakes of Titan to a space fuel station in orbit around Earth. Such a concept will most likely be a sphere like the Deathstar. It could be a reality in 50 years.

        • #200721
          Anonymous
          Guest

          damn

      • #200767
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Never because it’s scrotebrained

    • #200724
      Anonymous
      Guest

      People underestimate how much technological development hinges on a single human lifespan. The American space program rose and fell with Wernher von Brau, because only he and his peers had the expertise over a lifetime of developing rockets. If you don’t pass on those skills then the next generation can only ape what previous generations did, and as systems become more complex a bottleneck develops. Additionally, an environment where people believe in the future is necessary for continued technological development, if the human motivation is simply collecting a paycheck then technology will stagnant.

      • #200765
        Anonymous
        Guest

        a post of truth in a thread full of bullshit

      • #200793
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Under rated post. That’s a powerful insight.

      • #200804
        Anonymous
        Guest

        100% correct

      • #200890
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Dude! Yeah! I think the hacking culture around the Commodore 64 and other early computers is coming to a halt as that generation ages, and it is that reason why Linux and Open Source is starting to fall now. They forgot to pass on that knowledge! I had no idea how to write machine language or start freaking with chips until the 8 bit guy introduced me to the culture and Ben Eater showed me what it was. I was freaking around with Arduinos and Raspberry Pis for wayyy too long!

    • #200729
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Yes, because human capital is in decline since early 20th century, after scientific progress relieved eugenic pressures.
      Some anon said that ai singularity is a cope akin to the believe in "education", that it somehow will save us from real world and biology.
      Of course no amount of investment in magic ai’s or education will turn a low iq scrote into a productive member of society.
      It’s over.
      But also there is no end to history.

      • #200733
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Yes, because human capital is in decline since early 20th century, after scientific progress relieved eugenic pressures.
        If science was just the sober pursuit of truth then it would have increased eugenic pressures, as there’s no reason why humans would fall outside the remit of scientific improvement. The reason science has had dysgenic consequences is politicscrotes and moralscrotes.

      • #200736
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Its nukes and missiles in general.
        A country that isn’t afraid of a war isn’t a under a threat of warfare on its territory, is much less likely to invest in scientific projects. And, scientific projects that are too good to be true, but may give them an edge in warfare.
        I believe all technological and scientific progress is driven by a primitive fear of survival.
        >Can’t survive the cold, can’t sleep on the ground or freeze to death.
        >Make a bed, sleeping bag.
        >Can’t weather the storm, literally, make a house.
        >Too sunny, make a hat (so you don’t die from sun exposure).
        >Can’t see (predators) well in sunlight, make glasses.
        >Want to bring water to x location, hands can’t hold it, make a bucket(not die from dehydration).
        >Can’t kill x animal, with y weapon, make a better one, make traps.
        >Can’t find a reliable source of food in the wild, domestic X animal, farm Y crop.
        You get the idea, nukes and ballistic missiles make war pointless. Nukes won’t bring fallout tier world or landscape, but they will destroy any city or object the hit successfully, which will render all your production and thinking capacity moot and useless.
        Basically, we reached a natural stop. A perfect predator cannot exist in the wild, because it will eat all its food, so there is no perfect predator.
        A perfect weapon doesn’t exist, so humans have to work to innovate and make one better.
        But missiles in general are pretty much perfect and very cheap way to destroy things.
        Thanks for reading my blog post.

        • #200751
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Correct, but survival of the gene, not the individual. Most technological innovation came from gathering wealth to increase reproductive fitness. This has also been killed by social media. Now the path to reproductive success is being born a Chad, and Chads are generally harmful to society. Working for beta bucks and sustaining civilization will no longer get you a loyal wife, so why bother?

          • #200752
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Working for betabucks still gets you a wife I think, now I don’t know about loyal.
            Don’t know about the EU though since they have socialism lite.

      • #200738
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >eugenic pressures
        When women are selecting males to mate with, they don’t choose the intelligent ones, they choose braindead troglodytes who are 6’5" with square face bones. That’s where the lack of eugenic pressure comes from, it’s not about technology.

        • #200739
          Anonymous
          Guest

          It is not about t levels or bone structure, it’s that low iq’s and their offspring aren’t dying as a result of something like bad weather and poor planning(ooops, it’s only january and i have no food left, i guess it’s time to die).

          • #200740
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >ooops, it’s only january and i have no food left, i guess it’s time to die

            It’s something like that but you’re not taking it far enough. It used to be that you will run out of food in the winter. So there was an advantage to having tall scrotebrained chuds around for all the back-breaking farming or hunting work that was needed.
            Now that is no longer the case. We can produce all the food we need with very little labour. What gives you any advantage, more than ever in today’s environment, is your brain. But sexual selection is still stuck in the past where it was a constant physical fight to stay alive.
            It’s the same with the obesity epidemic. Our instincts are still stuck in the past, where there were constant famines, and are now making us sick and dead.
            The first culture, where people find intelligence genuinely hot, will be the culture that rules the galaxy.

            • #200747
              Anonymous
              Guest

              We already live in that culture, you’re just stuck with the kind of intelligence that gets zero pussy.

            • #200928
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >Unironically using chuds
              You just blow in from discord? Also YWNBAW.

            • #200933
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >The first culture, where people find intelligence genuinely hot, will be the culture that rules the galaxy.
              T.

            • #200954
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >So there was an advantage to having tall scrotebrained chuds around for all the back-breaking farming or hunting work that was needed.
              Humans still need to move and be physically fit in order to also perform well in other tasks. One of the sources of new neurons is the Hyppothalamus, and that part is active through exercise. Being sedentary not only is unhealthy for your body, but also your mind. What this means is that taking care of your health and body will not be less important. Don’t forgo physical exertion because it’s for "scrotebrained chuds".

            • #200957
              Anonymous
              Guest

              T. Incel trannie

      • #200742
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Yes, because human capital is in decline since early 20th century, after scientific progress relieved eugenic pressures.
        If science was just the sober pursuit of truth then it would have increased eugenic pressures, as there’s no reason why humans would fall outside the remit of scientific improvement. The reason science has had dysgenic consequences is politicscrotes and moralscrotes.

        I used to be in research, pursued the career up to a few years as a postdoc before going to industry. The situation is really dire and clearly in decline.
        First there is the ever more brutal climate in science, it is a dog eat dog world where loose ethics and sharp elbows are the only way to get promoted. Noble ideals about science for humanity was dumped out the window years ago.
        Secondly, and as follows from the above, there is the ever growing problem with fake papers, as documented by Retraction Watch. Since publication count is crucial for promotions, a lot of papers should never have been published or approved. But there we are. Meanwhile an increasing number of vigilantes are working flat out to unmask the frauds, see Clare Francis as an example. Counter attacks are underway, of course, and people are trying to remove Retraction Watch from Wikipedia.
        Thirdly and hardly surprisingly, we are in the middle of a replication crisis. People try to reproduce earlier publications, and cannot get the same results. This stinks.
        Fourthly, academia is so into "gender research" that large sums are now redirected to this rather than science. Tax payers believe taxes also go to research and science, thinking of technology and medicine, but reality is that vast sums are going to "gender research" and political "sciences" designed to agree with whoever is in power just now.

        There cannot be any doubt there is a decline, but not all are aware of the full scope of this mess.

        • #200745
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Researchers should be given good salaries and the resources to carry out their research with no pressure.
          Not the gender studies ones though, what is there even there to research? You either got a dick and balls or you don’t.

          • #200749
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >Researchers should be given good salaries and the resources to carry out their research with no pressure.
            That would have been nice, yes. I quit because my salary was far too low to handle my student loans. Also 2 year postdoc contracts meant I would pay into retirement funds but since the employment was so short I will never get a penny out of it. A lot of people are stranded in the postdoc limbo and will retire with a horrible pension.
            >Not the gender studies ones though, what is there even there to research? You either got a dick and balls or you don’t.
            Last I heard they have "discovered" 61 "genders" so who knows what they are huffing.

            • #200750
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >student loans
              The fuck is a student loan

              • #200768
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Universities charge for admission and it also turns out you need money to pay for food, accommodation, books, travel and more. For this people take up loans. This will have to be paid back.

    • #200741
      Anonymous
      Guest

      It has flattened. Not declined. There’s no way for technology to decline since that implies that it regresses but tech only moves forward. I don’t see us going back to typewriters after using keyboards but then the technology is now stale/plateaud.

      • #200808
        Anonymous
        Guest

        The dark ages.

    • #200744
      Anonymous
      Guest
    • #200746
      Anonymous
      Guest

      yes, very definitely, and it started around 2012 when people were complaining about the rate at which technology became obsolete. You could buuy a computer or phone and within a year it was totally obsolete.
      Governments asked the tech companies to slow down their innovative release cycles and it just got worse and worse. Governments even told the military to offer contracts where companies could not use military patents for consumer goods for 20 years rather than the previous 10 years
      research it – you will see what I am talking about

    • #200760
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I work in chemical manufacturing. Over the past 10 years, we went from bulky lab equipment to having star trek tricorder handheld levels of technology.

      • #200761
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Pictures for comparison, please. Sounds fascinating.

    • #200766
      Anonymous
      Guest

      What are some actually good tech developments of recent years?

      For me it’s Youtube tutorials. Pretty much anything I want to know how to do I can find a video of it on YT and that’s incredible. This was hard to do in the mid 90s and early 2000s, you had to look for it in books or find someone IRL who was knowledgeable in that topic.

      LED lights are pretty nifty and I like that they don’t consume much.

      • #200771
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >What are some actually good tech developments of recent years?
        CRISPR/cas9 is the only new thing I can think of.

      • #200915
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >LED lights are pretty nifty and I like that they don’t consume much.
        Literally a huge mistake

    • #200770
      Anonymous
      Guest

      We’re in a period of consolidation, more and more tools and methods from known techniques. Liquid metal batteries, metals that don’t expand or contract are two new inventions from old tech.
      Will we see them everywhere? Not for 20 years.

    • #200776
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Bloat is still growing

    • #200777
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >quantum computing
      >mRNA vaccines
      >machine learning solving the protein folding problem
      >dirt cheap solar
      >plant woke af meats
      >electric cars more common
      >adaptive cruise control and autopilot
      >fediverse
      >plenty of media can be found for free in HQ without piracy
      >5G
      Just off the top of my head. Some of these things might not be good, but each of them are technologically impressive compared to the 2000s and early 2010s. Personal computing, both mobile and desktop, are stagnant and they’re going to be incremented on while the economy moves to biotech.

      • #200783
        Anonymous
        Guest

        all of that tech has been around since the 70s and we are no better at it now.

      • #200821
        Anonymous
        Guest

        If that is what passes for "progress" these days we are truly in deep, deep trouble. Like fediverse?? Haha

      • #200822
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >dirt cheap solar

        Solar power is not efficient and reliable and will never replace traditional sources of power generation.

        • #200824
          Anonymous
          Guest

          yes it is

          • #200827
            Anonymous
            Guest

            it’s leftist "cheap" – i buy it, you pay for it.

      • #200849
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >quantum computing
        Isn’t real.
        >dirt cheap solar
        "It costs how much? I’ll just keep burning coal, thanks. t. Deutschland"
        >adaptive cruise control and autopilot
        *autopilots you into a concrete barrier at 140kph*
        *swerves into a pedestrian that it could clearly see one second ago*

    • #200778
      Anonymous
      Guest

      https://i.imgur.com/Fv5wvEz.gif

      >>quantum computing
      >>mRNA vaccines
      >>machine learning solving the protein folding problem
      >>dirt cheap solar
      >>plant woke af meats
      >>electric cars more common
      >>adaptive cruise control and autopilot
      >>fediverse
      >>plenty of media can be found for free in HQ without piracy
      >>5G

      • #200781
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >dirt cheap solar
        good send me some, I’ll pay 35 cents a watt, well above the predictions in 2007 when they were 3 years away from printing it on unlimited easy to make graphene

      • #200945
        Anonymous
        Guest

        woke af

    • #200779
      Anonymous
      Guest

      the raspberry pi is the biggest innovation in the last 60 years behind the tesla blowjob having car while on autopilot

      • #200800
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >the tesla blowjob having car while on autopilot
        henceforth known as a grimie (grimes only had one job and she blew it)

        • #200871
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Grimes wouldn’t blow it, and that was the problem.

          • #200872
            Anonymous
            Guest

            she wouldn’t blow him lucid, always sloppy half-hearted on xanax.

            • #200877
              Anonymous
              Guest

              That sounds like heaven tbh

              • #200881
                Anonymous
                Guest

                i’m not paying $150,000 for a half-hearted gimmie-mobile.

    • #200780
      Anonymous
      Guest

      VR, AR, battery capacity, storage capacity, Camera res, existing tech optimization. We stopped making bigger engines, now we’re making existing engines more efficient for their size. There’s still hyper-expansion in tech fields, its just way less interesting and directly impactful than the leap of 2007 or 2012 or 2014. Somewhere between 2011 and 2015 bluetooth which existed for a decade or longer blew up to the mainstream. QR is big in china, dead in the US. It’ll all catchup. Im riding the analog middle-tech wave of 2006-2019 like universal media players, LED HD projectors under 130 dollars, raspberry pi 4 retro cabinet, seated VR, chromecast and airplay junk. Its the future I imagined in 1999 for sure, cheaper and faster than ever, just not as impressive as the extrememly expensive ecosystems that make mine look outdated.

    • #200782
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Technological development meant to increase the utility a single user can gain from a said piece of tech is in decline.

      Technological development for the usage of group or governing bodies is on the incline.

      • #200906
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Good point. Everyone carries a surveillance device with them everywhere.

    • #200785
      Anonymous
      Guest

      this podcast is about the plans to centralize the internet and kill any semblance of anonymity and make sharing disinformation an official crime globally

      >https://odysee.com/@TLAVagabond:5/Whitney-Webb-Interview-10-8-21:b

      this is the accompanying article
      >https://unlimitedhangout.com/2021/07/investigative-reports/ending-anonymity-why-the-wefs-partnership-against-cybercrime-threatens-the-future-of-privacy/

      My question is how will this be implemented? Chinese style firewalls? Will they just target individual servers/hosts?

    • #200790
      Anonymous
      Guest

      test

    • #200792
      *****WARNING IF YOU ARE READING THIS YOU ARE AN INFO WARRIOR*************
      Guest

      IF YOU ARE READING THIS INFORMATION, YOU ARE A TRUE *******INFOWARRIOR*******

      The epic cosmic space race between the evil demonic medicinni type 4 psychic rules of the sea pheonicians and the homegrown corn fed roots of liberty DEPEND ON YOU!!!!!!!!!

      What must be researched in order to win cosmic dick measuring contest?

      1. we must do what LINUX TORVALDS AND RICHARD STALLMAN did for software post 1980s corpo to open source BUT DO IT FOR IRL CONSOOOOOOOOOOOOOMABLES

      2. GOD HAS GIVEN US ALL TECHNOLOGY WE NEED… literally all the protein building blocks can be found in LITERAL freaking SHIT

      3. WE MUST CREATE A NEW ******************SPIRITUAL MIND MELD MASS HALLUCINATION NETWORK**************** THAT EVADES SURVEILLANCE ************ON A QUANTUM SCALE******************

      https://youtu.be/IS5ycm7VfXg

      • #200836
        Anonymous
        Guest

        nice drumset

      • #200848
        Anonymous
        Guest

        that’s cool an all but how many people do you know that have an electron microscope at home?

      • #200867
        Anonymous
        Guest
    • #200801
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Bros, i just cant stop thinking about demographics and its making me a total doomer.
      The west has shit birthrates, and instead of trying to improve them we are actively replacing ourselves with low IQ 3rd worlders that have an IQ barely higher than room temperature. How can scietific and technological progress keep up if Europeans are gone?
      Is there any chance that im being a schizo and that Europeans are still the majority in Europe after im gone? Please bros i want to be in the wrong here, its making me depressed af.

      • #200816
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Bumping this

      • #200818
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Near as I can tell you’re correct. Have white kids and raise them on compilers

        • #200819
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Does anyone have an archived link to that tweet?

      • #200868
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Sweden might actually save you, their national party is set to win the next election (election happens in 2 years) and they’re gonna stop immigration from outside the EU and also revoke the permit people outside the EU have to stay in Sweden. On an EU level Sweden is one of the few countries that are pushing for the EU to accept more asylum seekers (the other one being Germany) so if Sweden switches position, and with Germany in disarray after their election, we might Sweden’s new policy become EU policy.

        Denmark has also introduced a bill that makes it so that asylum seekers from outside the EU aren’t hosted in Denmark but is instead kept in 3rd party countries and never enter Denmark.

        It looks bad but stuff is actually getting fixed. But do have children, and don’t have like 1 or 2, have 5 kids.

        • #200894
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >don’t have like 1 or 2, have 5 kids.
          but white women only want one kid, do i need to get an asian gf like the rest of tech bros?

      • #200913
        Anonymous
        Guest

        East Asians will carry on the torch of civilization after Europeans have died out.

      • #200917
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Shit has to get bad before people get out of their comfort zones and start to act. Problem is, the designed and deliberate demographic swamping of our homelands has very few solutions other than ones which are currently unpalatable. But then again we’ve been through genocidal sis wars, plagues, a full damned century of brain damaged communist social engineering, the collapse of empires and even the total collapse of high civilization before. We’re at our best when shit is at its worst.

    • #200805
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Quality of almost everything has gone to shit.

    • #200809
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Yes blame libtards and their "muh environment" bullshit. The proceed to sit latte and consome fast fashion while they complain on their macbooks and iPhones they buy on a yearly basis.

    • #200814
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Not really. Tech tends to move in large jumps and then level off. Look at car development. Huge technological leaps from the early 1900s to the 1940s. After that it starts to slow down. Same with airplanes except a couple decades later. Most tech has around a 50 year rapid development cycle and then it starts to slow down. Computers are no different. We’re just reaching the end of that initial 50 year boom.

      • #200815
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I think it’s a matter of optics. Humans having zero hindsight and so on.
        Thousands of years have passed in which technological progress basically amounted to making a sharp piece of metal a little sharper. And now we have arificial intelligence and virtual worlds in a matter of 5 years but still complain about it as being "stagnated"

        • #200817
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Even back then tech tended to move in leaps rather than a steady line. What I think it is is someone figures something out and then others come along and improve upon the invention to its logical limit. At that point it appears to stagnate until someone else comes along with a revolutionary new idea and the cycle repeats.

    • #200820
      me
      Guest

      no, it isn’t.
      The middle-class, ‘muh incentives’ proprietary, state-corporate culture is in decline though, and it will not recover, it seems.

      • #200826
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >no, it isn’t.
        Got anything to back that up with? About 100 replies before you disagree strongly.

        • #200832
          me
          Guest

          >Got anything to back that up with?
          no if you’re american. Because it’s all there is – middle-class, ‘muh incentives’ proprietary, state-corporate culture. The universe doesn’t revolve around n america.

          • #200835
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >no if you’re american.
            No, I am not American.
            >Because it’s all there is – middle-class, ‘muh incentives’ proprietary, state-corporate culture.
            That is hardly convincing. To the contrary, state-corporate culture sounds more of stagnation and celebration of mediocrity than the opposite.
            >The universe doesn’t revolve around n america.
            True, it is just more visible over there.

    • #200831
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I think the real next big jump for phones/computers/wearable shit will be solid state batteries (that can also flex/bend). Capacity will go up by a metric fuckton too, allowing electric gars to outdo range of gas cars ending the era of gas cars for good.

      • #200833
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Would they get worn out slower? Because if yes companies will find a way to gimp them

        • #200834
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Yea, but we’re at a point where we need to make lasting shit because the environment is literally goanna kills us otherwise if we keep up at the rate of shit we’ve been doing till now. Solid state by design solve the dendrite problem that current batteries have, there’s no real way to gimp that without making the solid state batter unusuable (it would be no better than lithium ion then).

      • #200837
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Capacity will go up by a metric fuckton too
        As you increase the power density you also increase explosivity. It will not take much time before you will not be allowed to board a plane with state of the art batteries.

        • #200839
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Nope
          >A solid-state battery has higher energy density than a Li-ion battery that uses liquid electrolyte solution. It doesn’t have a risk of explosion or fire, so there is no need to have components for safety, thus saving more space. Then we have more space to put more active materials which increase battery capacity in the battery.

          • #200840
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Source: SamBA-BOOOMsung
            Wikipedia is more careful:
            >solid-state batteries are believed to have lower risk of catching fire
            >believed
            Yet also notes
            >Dendrites penetrate the separator between the anode and the cathode causing short circuits. This causes overheating, which may result in fires or explosions from thermal runaway.[51]

            • #200841
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Dendrites are literally a lithium ion problem. The whole reason for solid state battery creation is to avoid that problem, so even when pierced it wont short circuit like that.

              • #200842
                Anonymous
                Guest

                So where does all the energy go then when it catches fire or short circuits?

                • #200843
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  A battery electrolyte is usually a liquid or gel, and can develop gases or leak out of the battery if something goes wrong. Particles or small spikes on or between the poles inside the battery may cause a short circuit, leading to overheating and fire. Too fast charging or discharging may also cause overheating, gas development and fire; damage or high external temperature may as well. But if we manage to make electrolytes out of solid materials, we could eliminate the risk of short circuits, gas generation and leakage, and thus the danger of the battery spontaneously catching fire or exploding.

    • #200838
      Anonymous
      Guest

      No, but the economy is in decline.

    • #200846
      Anonymous
      Guest

      OI JOSUKE I think OP is a stand user!

    • #200854
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Yes, you can thank climate activists for that.

      • #200855
        Anonymous
        Guest

        wtf i love the environment now

        • #200955
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Kek

    • #200856
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Every goddamn industry on this earth has been metagamed to the extreme by big corporations and subsequently ruined: movies, music, vidya, phones, hardware, CRT vs LCD, etc. There is just no way around it. Look at the price of a phone or GPU these days. Look at the poor quality of movies and games. Corporations are built to milk everything they can and create a monopoly of mediocrity. Be the only one to provide a service, and brainwash the masses to ONLY use that very service and shit on any other up-and-coming product that would compete with them.

      We are in a day and age where tech companies are so big that they physically cannot fail. Google and Microsoft can have project after project that fail, but in the end it doesn’t matter to them. For example, when you rely on a service like Google drive or Onedrive, then that service might not even exist tomorrow if they pull the plug. That puts your company and your data at risk. Maybe we need some small-business equivalent for tech or something to protect them, because a few top companies will consume everything and possibly even form cartels if they haven’t already.

      • #200889
        Anonymous
        Guest

        You know, the main argument for megacorps and industrialization is that the products would become higher quality and cheaper. People still laugh at me when I say that hand-made stuff could be better than a factory. But your post sort of proves a good point: there is a size of a capitalistic company where the natural forces and checks and balances simply don’t apply anymore.

        Really, I’ve seen small companies do good things, only to be bought out by these big megacorps and have their baby raped into corporate interest. What I want to know, though, is where these guys are, and if they’re still willing to do quality work on commission so I can just get a small pocket of quality for me and my family.

        I’ve seen that the tech just hasn’t spread very well in America. Let me explain.

        The companies get the reputation that they are the "experts in X" and so everybody just trusts them to do a good job. The argument is that they will do a good job, because if they don’t, then they won’t get the money. But, without competition, they will do the BARE MINIMUM to make the sale and the result is heavy advertisement and plastic bullshit.

        But HOW did these guys to X? How can I tell if X was TRULY done well? Can I read the patent (Which is the spirit of IP law) to see what they did and determine if that is a good fit for my particular situation? People have just taken it on blind faith that "America is so great that we don’t NEED to learn" and as a result neglected the checks and balances that MAKE America great.

        tl;dr: Everyone should read the book. Because no president (including Trump) will ever be able to do that for you.

        • #200895
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Not the anon you replied to but the issues interest me

          >You know, the main argument for megacorps and industrialization is that the products would become higher quality and cheaper.
          That is true. With large volumes you can apply statistical quality methods. That is what Japanese companies did to outcompete US companies that didn’t care about quality. This gave us strange effects such as Japanese toy cameras having better optics than Western non-toy cameras, since the Japanese realised that its is far better to increase volume in order to improve quality and instead segment the market for setting the cost. Western companies could have done it but chose not to, until their customers left them.

          >People still laugh at me when I say that hand-made stuff could be better than a factory.
          Yes, it can be but is far less certain. Statistical quality methods will deliver impressive results.

          >Really, I’ve seen small companies do good things, only to be bought out by these big megacorps and have their baby raped into corporate interest.
          This is true and there has been a shift in innovation policies where large companies reduce in-house development and instead buy startups with the next big thing.

          >What I want to know, though, is where these guys are, and if they’re still willing to do quality work on commission so I can just get a small pocket of quality for me and my family.
          They are out there but usually have an exit strategy for IPO or being bought by the dominant company in their field. They start in stealth mode so you cannot find them, and when they come out of stealth the time to exit is as short as they can manage. Very few companies aim for a future as a going company in itself.

          • #200897
            Anonymous
            Guest

            I have a couple potential solution for this:

            What if communities of families used the industrialization technology on their own? I don’t see how 20-30 families can’t all pitch-in and get a collectively-owned factory. With robot arms and assembly lines and statistical quality methods. I saw a small town in Pennsylvania do exactly that and they seemed quite well off. Only 1 McDonalds and a couple insurance corpos, their own pizza company, clean and well-build roads, and one huge factory just outside of town.

            It’s not just about the money at that point, but about security. If all of society collapsed, that community would still have their factory. They could teach their kids to work there. They themselves get the fruits of their own labor. They would be much more likely to get special requests (like if someone wanted to use the machine after-hours for a personal project) especially if they were willing to pay a premium for it.

            Now, in order to be bought out, it wouldn’t be as easy as money. And, of course, the whole nation would benefit from enhanced competition and a greater diversity of products if many communities did this.

            I’m interested in metal machining for parts for old cars. They were much simpler back then and easier to "get a grip" on. I would really like to keep this old manual transmission clunker alive and I’m sure there’s enough of us to support a few such community factories focused around car parts.

            • #200898
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >What if communities of families used the industrialization technology on their own? I don’t see how 20-30 families can’t all pitch-in and get a collectively-owned factory. With robot arms and assembly lines and statistical quality methods.
              My background in this is as a former quality assurance (QA) auditor, I am no expert. What we learned was that you need a large volume to get this to works, probably more than thousands of items/parts/steps/products to get this to work. You could perhaps set up a common infrastructure so that collectively owned factories shared a database for getting this to work, a kind of QA as a service, though that quickly ramps up complexities. This kind of work is rather invisible (until things go wrong) but requires a lot of expertise.

              >I saw a small town in Pennsylvania do exactly that and they seemed quite well off. Only 1 McDonalds and a couple insurance corpos, their own pizza company, clean and well-build roads, and one huge factory just outside of town.
              McDonalds (and other franchises like it) have their own QA handbook. The dirty little secret in QA is that it is process oriented and it avoids the need for thinking for production staff. you can also get things to work if people think, or "relying on heroes" is it is known in these circles. Sure it can work but when these people retire or fall ill, everything implodes.

              >It’s not just about the money at that point, but about security. If all of society collapsed, that community would still have their factory. They could teach their kids to work there. They themselves get the fruits of their own labor. They would be much more likely to get special requests (like if someone wanted to use the machine after-hours for a personal project) especially if they were willing to pay a premium for it.
              You can always get far with low tech equipment and hard work.

          • #200899
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Following up the second part of below:

            You know, the main argument for megacorps and industrialization is that the products would become higher quality and cheaper. People still laugh at me when I say that hand-made stuff could be better than a factory. But your post sort of proves a good point: there is a size of a capitalistic company where the natural forces and checks and balances simply don’t apply anymore.

            Really, I’ve seen small companies do good things, only to be bought out by these big megacorps and have their baby raped into corporate interest. What I want to know, though, is where these guys are, and if they’re still willing to do quality work on commission so I can just get a small pocket of quality for me and my family.

            I’ve seen that the tech just hasn’t spread very well in America. Let me explain.

            The companies get the reputation that they are the "experts in X" and so everybody just trusts them to do a good job. The argument is that they will do a good job, because if they don’t, then they won’t get the money. But, without competition, they will do the BARE MINIMUM to make the sale and the result is heavy advertisement and plastic bullshit.

            But HOW did these guys to X? How can I tell if X was TRULY done well? Can I read the patent (Which is the spirit of IP law) to see what they did and determine if that is a good fit for my particular situation? People have just taken it on blind faith that "America is so great that we don’t NEED to learn" and as a result neglected the checks and balances that MAKE America great.

            tl;dr: Everyone should read the book. Because no president (including Trump) will ever be able to do that for you.

            >I’ve seen that the tech just hasn’t spread very well in America. Let me explain.
            >The companies get the reputation that they are the "experts in X" and so everybody just trusts them to do a good job. The argument is that they will do a good job, because if they don’t, then they won’t get the money. But, without competition, they will do the BARE MINIMUM to make the sale and the result is heavy advertisement and plastic bullshit.
            Culture is important. My understanding is that in Japan the companies felt responsible to the customers to deliver good quality. When I lived there I saw massively over-engineered appliances and other equipment unlike anything in the West.

            >But HOW did these guys to X?
            In the West it is normal that these guys broke out of another company that made our guys frustrated. That meant they knew the market, the products and the customers.

            >How can I tell if X was TRULY done well?
            With today’s complexities taht is hard. 40 years ago you could see that things lasted longer, ran smoother etc.

            >Can I read the patent (Which is the spirit of IP law) to see what they did and determine if that is a good fit for my particular situation?
            Yes you can. That is in fact part of the reason for the patent system. Patent databases can be complex but many are free.

            >People have just taken it on blind faith that "America is so great that we don’t NEED to learn" and as a result neglected the checks and balances that MAKE America great.
            That gave us the Japanese shock of the 80’s and the "quartz crisis" in the 70’s. I have several stories how the West in general and the US in particular were shocked by what Japanese companies were able to do, stories I read when I started out in QA.

            >tl;dr: Everyone should read the book. Because no president (including Trump) will ever be able to do that for you.
            Which book, the one in

            What has been the biggest advancement since, the iPhone? Nothing major, jut faster smaller and better versions of what we already had.

            ?

            • #200901
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >Which book
              I use that metaphorically, meaning that people should read about the things that they are doing. I really with there was one specific book that outlined it. Living in the US? Read the constitution. Driving a car? Know how an engine works. Eating farm-raised food? Know about agriculture. etc.

              Not just from books either. I’ve learned lots of things from lots of ways

              • #200902
                Anonymous
                Guest

                I really wish*

            • #200904
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >I have several stories how the West in general and the US in particular were shocked by what Japanese companies were able to do

              Please share. I would love to hear it

    • #200864
      Anonymous
      Guest

      The low hanging fruit has been picked.

      The curve might have looked exponential but it wasn’t on long enough timeline and we’re now finding that out.

    • #200869
      Anonymous
      Guest

      bump

    • #200873
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Yep last 3-15 years

      • #200874
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Yep that’s when Moore’s law came to a screeching halt

        • #200880
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Yep and last year prices went insane as performance slips it’s happening

    • #200882
      Anonymous
      Guest

      bump

    • #200883
      Anonymous
      Guest

      https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=development%2Cstagnation&year_start=1800&year_end=2019&corpus=26&smoothing=3&case_insensitive=true

      Conclusion: development peaked in 1978, stagnation had a through in 2010 but is on the increase. We are in trouble.

    • #200885
      Anonymous
      Guest

      absolutely not, only the coomsumer market has turned to shit because we’ve never had so many scrotebrains with money at any point in history so why release new cutting-edge tech when you can sell trash to people and they come back for more of the same shit in slightly different color every year?
      there is no such thing as an evil elite that plot against muh small people in fact we get exactly what we deserve and what we voted for.
      people need to stop with the persecution complex, we vote for the same people and we buy the same shit all the time, things have no reason to change when we support the current status quo as much as we do these days…

    • #200888
      Anonymous
      Guest

      It took more than five minutes for some scrotebrain come into this thread to blame capitalism. You idiots are getting slow. Step it up.

      • #200914
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Posts in this thread have been much more than "capitalism bad".

        Try reading the thread before posting shit.

    • #200926
      Anonymous
      Guest

      If you want to own the technology yes if you don’t care about that and don’t want it to last more than a few years then it’s still moving forward but not as fast as before

    • #200943
      Anonymous
      Guest
      • #200948
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technopoly
        A pile of garbage written by a media theorist and cultural critic, who despised technology, and ended up dying of lung cancer. It is a desperate argument for handing all control of tech over to self declared intellectual luddites, a concept I see too often.

        Technological development has done more to better human conditions than any literature critic ever did.

        • #200949
          Anonymous
          Guest

          all im seeing is ad hominem attacks and a fallacious insinuation that because he died of lung cancer we must reject what he said, and embrace technocracy.

          if he died of cancer,
          then so did marie curie,
          so did the hibakusha in hiroshima and nagasaki,
          so did the marshall islanders in bikini atoll and wherever else nuclear weapons were tested,
          and so did all the people dealing with radioactive fallout from chernobyl.

          on the whole it is likely that technology has had many orders of magnitude more victims than beneficiciaries.
          and you cannot hear from then, for the simple reason that they are dead.

          • #200950
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >all im seeing is ad hominem attacks and a fallacious insinuation that because he died of lung cancer we must reject what he said, and embrace technocracy.
            No. I just pointed out that he rejected modern technological development where parts of it could have helped him. While there is no single cure for all forms of cancer, science has made great strides in curing many forms.
            It is not clear why you drag Marie Curie into this as she did a lot for science and I cannot remember reading that she wanted to stop science. And she did a lot to help people.
            >on the whole it is likely that technology has had many orders of magnitude more victims than beneficiciaries.
            Got a source for that? At least around here the life expectancy has increased dramatically the last 100 years.

    • #200944
      Anonymous
      Guest

      It took less time to invent and build a new nuclear energy plant than it takes TODAY just to build a nuclear plant.

    • #200946
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I don’t think we are stagnating however every tech advance you see published on papers might not be consumer ready yet.

    • #200951
      Anonymous
      Guest

      A world that worships Elon Musk as a scientific hero and a genious is probably doomed.

    • #200956
      Anonymous
      Guest

      mRNA vaccines and self driving cars are pretty cool

      • #200958
        Anonymous
        Guest

        You mean garden gnome vaccines and garden gnomed cars? No thanks rabbi

    • #200959
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >in vitro embryo growth is still illegal past 14 days
      >nuclear energy is verboten
      >western countries have violated freedom of association
      >the protein folding problem has still not be solved

      I’m going back to bed. Wake me up when even a smidgen of progress happens on any of this shit.
      Hard mode caveats: progress outside of israel and china, and without meme-AI involved

      >but muh google deep ai solved the protein folding problem
      it, in fact, did not. scrote.

      • #200960
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Even soft mode is too hard. I can only conclude you have cracked the secret of long term hibernation.

Viewing 64 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
startno id