How are so many people i’m interviewing with CS degrees so freaking awful at this shit?

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    • #198365
      Anonymous
      Guest

      how are so many people i’m interviewing with CS degrees so freaking awful at this shit?

      they’re failing on stuff that should only be as hard as like, first-year homework material

      these scrotes got through systems, OS, discrete math, algos, and electives on top of that with like a 3.2-3.6 GPA and they can’t answer these questions?

      were they ALL copying off one dude every class or something?

    • #198366
      Anonymous
      Guest

      If they didn’t cheat, they were cheated by their know-nothing professors and their decades-obsolete CS programs that teach visual basic or java instead of fundamentals.
      I tried a C++ course in uni once, it was several weeks in and we still hadn’t gotten to functions or for loops, just if statements.
      Oh, and if you moved faster than the rest of the class, you got marked down for using forbidden features.

      • #198374
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >teacher wants to see if you can sort an array
        >takes points off because you just used std::sort()
        >>whaaaaatttt???!!! are you marking me down because I’m using fOrBiDdEn fEaTuReS??!! Because im moving too fassttt??!!!!!

        • #198379
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Oh we never even learned to do that the first semester.
          I didn’t even know how to return from a function so I was calling main() within a function and the TA didn’t even mark me down for that.

        • #198456
          Anonymous
          Guest

          if someone interviewing you asks you to sort an array they will want the same answer your teacher taught you

        • #198512
          Anonymous
          Guest

          I remember starting primary school, I was all gung ho and had spent the whole summer learning all the letters. When school started I was like "LOL BITCHES I KNOW THIS SHIT" and then the teacher told me I had to sit and learn A, B and C like all the other kids. I knew in that moment school was bullshit. In retrospect I do understand the teacher’s situation somewhat, what was he supposed to do, let one kid sit and play gameboy in class or something? But I never had respect for school after that.

          Took me many decades to get an autodidactic process for structured learning going proper.

          • #198573
            Anonymous
            Guest

            My teachers let me read books in class.

          • #198586
            Anonymous
            Guest

            My parents were pretty picky about making sure we didn’t end up with teachers like that. They got really mad when my sister’s teacher mentioned what a problem it was that she knew so much of the material already and how it would only get worse if they didn’t slow her down. Next semester we moved schools to one that let us take whatever level classes we matched.

        • #198569
          Anonymous
          Guest

          ??
          If the question is to sort an array, std::sort() is one of the best answers.
          If teacher want’s something else he can ask for it.
          For example "Write sorting algorithm".
          But that would require them to think.

      • #198417
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I’m at community college and we just covered functions at week 7, it sucks.

        • #198452
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Also at community college we haven’t even gotten to functions yet and just started loops last week

          • #198556
            Anonymous
            Guest

            i don’t see an issue with that. honest question, what would a "correct order" look like?

            • #198564
              Anonymous
              Guest

              the order isn’t the issue it’s just that unless you’re literally scrotebrained you can learn basic python or whatever in like half an hour

      • #198481
        Anonymous
        Guest

        SIR here. we have to spend 1 year(compulsory) doing physics, chemistry, calculus with one single cs subject. the second year is the classic introduction to algorithms, but youll spend more time trying to pass calculus and law/constitution/psychology/finance/language subjects. im in year 3 of the 4 year course, spec in infosec, and theres scrotebrains who are looking for "app to do hacking" about to look for WE in a year.

        as someone planning on switching degrees to cs, could you tell me some questions you usually make or important things to remember?
        i don’t want someone to be so mad at me that they shitpost on 4chins

        datastructures-algorithms->object-oriented paradigm/programming with its corporate relevance(testing classes etc)->(corporate-relevant)git, containerization, deployment, webservers, backend i would say. and dont forget, you must be able to shit out leetcode on command, in 30 minutes, while smiling and waving to the interviewer. grim

    • #198367
      Anonymous
      Guest

      as someone planning on switching degrees to cs, could you tell me some questions you usually make or important things to remember?
      i don’t want someone to be so mad at me that they shitpost on 4chins

    • #198368
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >how are so many people i’m interviewing with CS degrees so freaking awful at this shit?
      Idk anon I think it’s just everyone is stupid and school is ez. I got a buddy with a business degree that is constantly asking me ridiculously easy questions that are like middle/high school math. This week it was basic unit conversions freaking baffling.
      I’m a college dropout so nothing to brag about but actually read books and learn about things im interested in. Normies are content being scrotebrained it seems like

    • #198369
      Anonymous
      Guest

      post the questions scrotebrain

      • #198370
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Given a set of points and edges, find the smallest vertex cover.

        • #198371
          Anonymous
          Guest

          nani?

          • #198380
            Anonymous
            Guest

            A vertex cover is a subset of vertices which has a connection to every edge on the graph;
            i.e. take the set of edges, and transform it into the corresponding vertices. This is a vertex cover, but a large one.

            Motivation: You would like to secure a building filled with hallways, but want to minimize the number of guards. Naturally, you only need a guard on one side of the hallway.

            • #198394
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Now give a direct reduction proof for its complexity class from SAT then an algorithm which is at least 2-approximation, runs at least better than any ILP implementation and the proof for it. Should be no big deal, I’ll give you 15 minutes.

              • #198403
                Anonymous
                Guest

                inspired by Shelah, i give you
                >direct reduction proof for its complexity class from SAT
                proof: check (analogous to 2.8 in [76])
                >an algorithm which is at least 2-approximation, runs at least better than any ILP implementation
                trivial
                proof: think

                • #198405
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  >proof: think
                  hired

                • #198406
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  >proof: think

          • #198381
            Anonymous
            Guest

            ugly and trivial integral

            posterchild problem for introductory linear programming, usually taught by the end of your discrete meme course

            I have a cs degree and I don’t remember any math off the top of my head
            I’m pretty sure a vertex cover is where you pick a set of edges that touch all the vertices, but I don’t remember the algorithm to do so minimally

            embarrassing

            • #198392
              Anonymous
              Guest

              ur so fuckin smort anon

        • #198375
          Anonymous
          Guest

          What form is the input? Never heard this one before but it sounds easy enough?

        • #198377
          Anonymous
          Guest

          I have a cs degree and I don’t remember any math off the top of my head
          I’m pretty sure a vertex cover is where you pick a set of edges that touch all the vertices, but I don’t remember the algorithm to do so minimally

        • #198388
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >NP-hard question in an interview
          That’s stupid senpai

          • #198687
            Anonymous
            Guest

            the only winning answer is not to play

        • #198398
          Anonymous
          Guest

          If you explain the problem in plain English I don’t see a problem but if you are going to make me bust out my discrete math textbook just to understand what you’re asking I’m walking out. There’s a difference between testing problem solving and memorization of math jargon no one uses in a professional setting.

          • #198412
            Anonymous
            Guest

            But how else will shit-eating college graduates flex their degree and status for having wasted 100k in government loans to learn higher math?

            • #198413
              Anonymous
              Guest

              jokes on you mine was only 30k

              • #198557
                Anonymous
                Guest

                >jokes on you mine was only 30k

                […]
                jokes on both of you im getting payed like 6k for mine

                >jokes on both of you im getting payed like 6k for mine

                Imagine paying at all for a worthless so-called credential and publicly admitting that.

                • #198626
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  second anon was getting paid not paying lol

            • #198416
              Anonymous
              Guest

              jokes on you mine was only 30k

              jokes on both of you im getting payed like 6k for mine

              • #198422
                Anonymous
                Guest

                woke af and full ride pulled
                me too
                all on government gibs

            • #198509
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >wasted on higher math
              But CS is literally about making higher math useful lmfao. So many LULZtards are seething that either their program was horrible or that their program wasn’t squarely focused on codemonkeying

          • #198415
            Anonymous
            Guest

            there’s a fine line between grad level problems and schizo babble

          • #198484
            Anonymous
            Guest

            this

          • #198508
            Anonymous
            Guest

            The fuck are you on about? If you’re a CS undergrad, you should INSTANTLY know the words graph, vertex cover, vertex, etc. These are used all the time in algo….
            You’re honestly the reason why everyone laughs at CS undergrads

            • #198526
              Anonymous
              Guest

              wtf never heard as senior 10+ years….

              • #198529
                Anonymous
                Guest
            • #198671
              Anonymous
              Guest

              I graduated 6 months ago and can barely remember. My course was this

              >Fundamentals of programming
              >Networks and Communication fundamentals
              >Professional Communication
              >Discrete Math
              >Digital power
              >Object-Oriented Programming
              >Advanced Statistics w/ R
              >Assembly and Computer Organization
              >Web Technologies and Fundamentals
              >Data, Structure and Algorithms
              >Mobile Application development
              >Cyber Security
              >Information Systems
              >Math of Software Engineering
              >Advanced Web Technologies
              >Wireless Technology
              >Large project
              >Robotic Engineering
              >Operating Systems
              >System CMD programming
              >IT Law
              >Database Management & SQL
              >Network Security
              >Network System Programming

              I struggled to remember half of the names of these, I helped majority of students through these units. Ask me general stuff I can tell you, but teach you the entire course and you can go fuck yourself. I barely remember jack shit I have a catalog in my head that allows me to find answers and informatiom necessary to solve these problems. Not the exact worked out solutiom itself.

        • #198401
          Anonymous
          Guest
        • #198409
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Yeah I would not work for a company that asks this

          • #198430
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >NP-hard question in an interview
            That’s stupid senpai

            Congrats, you failed the interview. The point of the question is not to come up with a working solution with optimum runtime, but to demonstrate your ability understand an abstract concept that the interviewer is presenting to you, think about it logically, and work collaboratively with them to try to develop something that approaches a solution. If I were interviewing and asked this question, I’d accept any answer other than "I don’t know" or "it’s not solvable/it’s NP hard so it’s not fair to ask." If they understood the question and the desired solution and white boarded an example, then started writing a depth-first oriented solution to start looking for endpoints, then they’ve passed the question with flying colors and I’d have them move on. But if they’re just going to throw their hands up and say "I can’t" when faced with a challenge and don’t at least try to talk it out, why would I want them on my team?

            • #198432
              Anonymous
              Guest

              It’s pointless asking questions which require approximation algorithms without asking for any proofs. You’re a brainlet.

              • #198438
                Anonymous
                Guest

                a comment so dumb that even dubs don’t make it right – I just explained how a question like this is a valuable took to better understand how a candidate thinks and how they work as part of a team and to see their communication skills.in a controlled environment.

                • #198441
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  the
                  >so why do you want this job?
                  of technical interviews
                  captcha: HPV4X (which is appropriate because this thread gave me AIDS)

                • #198486
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  No, it’s not about their reasoning, if it was you’d ask a specific real world problem and ask them how they’d approach and solve it from the ground up. However in this case any solution without proof is useless, the whole purpose of algorithm design is to be able to get bounds on performance. However, in NP-complete problems having bounds on the solution is of utmost importance since without them your solution will most likely produce a useless solution. You’re just a brainlet who couldn’t pass one round at IOI or any real algorithm course yet feels superior because he gets to use these shitty undergrad questions on people who make software and ususally don’t have a need to remember this past their courses. But go ahead take again the wikipedia example and present it as something that happens every day at your java sweatshop.

            • #198440
              Anonymous
              Guest

              I didn’t say I couldn’t (although I think the solution I have in mind is very suboptimal) or that I would give up, just that I wouldn’t want to work for that company.

              Filtered by reading comprehension.

            • #198454
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Why would I put up with these mind games when I can get shit tons of interviews lined up where they won’t play these types of games?

            • #198517
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >Congrats, you failed the interview
              you make it sound like that’s a bad thing

            • #198558
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >your ability understand an abstract concept that the interviewer is presenting to you, think about it logically, and work collaboratively with them to try to develop something that approaches a solution

              LOL at this fool. Jargon and lingo designed to serve no other purpose than to gatekeep are not accomplishing any of those things. These pseudo-intellectual quizzes are just another way the irrelevant and stupid among us attempt to justify themselves.

              Any employer asking this should be ditched. Don’t waste your time, or demand they pay you for your time.

            • #198568
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Woke af expectation haver. Everyone saying "ew, why would i work for you" are missing the point because they’re low skill code monkeys larping as engineers.

            • #198589
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >not asking them to prove NP=coNP
              NGMI

            • #198631
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >throw their hands up and say "I can’t" when faced with a challenge
              but unlike you they do it for free

            • #198635
              Anonymous
              Guest

              literally shit-testing potential employees lmfao. this isn’t a romantic relationship where you’re the female party, you scrotebrain.

            • #198662
              Anonymous
              Guest

              isn’t this a very standard interview process? look at the absolute state of those replies.

            • #198688
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Lmao this. Imagine not giving a naive solution and calling it a day.

        • #198507
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >solve the problem exactly
          We don’t know if the naive solution to this problem is asymptotically the best one, but if you want it, it’s simple:
          Let 2^V be all nonempty subsets of V. For every X in 2^V, for every y in V X, check that there exists an x in X for which xy is in E. The smallest X that satisfies this property is exactly the vertex cover.
          >t-that’s a stupid solution and too slow scrotebrain
          Relax the problem to the fractional variant to find a very good approximation of the vertex cover
          >no I want exact!!!
          If you can guarantee the size of the vertex cover is small, call it k, I can do it pretty fast via FPT with 2^k * n^O(1).
          If you can guarantee that the graph is planar, I can use Demaine’s algorithm to draw a graph into a combinatorial surface of bounded genus, and do a clever dynamic programming algorithm to get the vertex cover in 2^sqrt(k) * n^O(1), which is insanely fast for such an intractable problem.

          • #198619
            Anonymous
            Guest

            monna, why are you talking to yourself

            • #198620
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Wat

        • #198539
          Anonymous
          Guest

          So.. You expect your interviewees to know djikstraz by heart?

          • #198541
            Anonymous
            Guest

            I mean, isn’t that just DFS with a min-heap?

            • #198542
              Anonymous
              Guest

              It’s not depth-first.

              • #198543
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Doesn’t matter. Its intuition isn’t hard. I’d probably give hints if I asked the problem since it isn’t fair to assume the interviewee knows it by name, but I don’t think the technique itself is impossible wrap your head around in 45 minutes.

                • #198547
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  >the intuition isn’t hard
                  this
                  most scrotebrains here are seething because they’ve failed to build up the intuition to solve these problems that shouldn’t be super hard after an undergrad’s worth of paying attention. They want big bucks for a codemonkey interview for a codemonkey job, not an engineer’s job.

        • #198587
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >pip install vertexcover
          done

        • #198676
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Lemme guess, if you pass this interview you get to primarily fix css bugs in wordpress

        • #198682
          Anonymous
          Guest

          is this just finding the dominating set?

          • #198683
            Anonymous
            Guest

            It reduces to the same problem yes.
            In general it’s NP hard

    • #198372
      Anonymous
      Guest

      CS degrees are not IOI prep-camps. Stop doing scrotebrained leetcode questions. This is ending up in the dumbest arms race of any industry in history. On the one hand scrotebrained seniors (they probably can’t do most of the questions on the spot either) who pick more and more outlandish leetcode problems and on the other an army of third world poos grinding leetcode armed with cracking the coding interview.

      • #198376
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Stop doing scrotebrained leetcode questions
        People who can learn leetcode can learn whatever they need to do on the job.

        People who can’t learn leetcode might still be able to learn whatever they need to do on the job, but no need to take the risk.

        If you complain about needing to solve leetcode (and frankly the vast majority of companies are only asking easy/medium questions that anyone who passed data structures without cheating or cheesing should be able to figure out just fine) you’re either lazy or low IQ.

        • #198387
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >Learn leetcode
          >High IQ
          Yeah, I’m thinking you’re a poo who spend a considerable amount of time with the h1b1 interview book. CS is not leetcode.

        • #198389
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >good at leetcode implies good engineer
          Curry scented Dunning-Kruger.

        • #198585
          Anonymous
          Guest

          only problem I have with leetcode is how useless the code is 75% of the time. yeah you’ll find some nice ways to make things more efficient but unless you never have to refactor/add more/pass it off to someone else to maintain you are better off sticking with the less efficient, more straightforward approach.
          this is why there is buggy unintelligible code in everything.
          IMO code interviews should be about readability as much as efficiency, but we won’t get that when 90% of the senior developers are cringe wizards that get off on unnecessarily esoteric code cough*haskell*cough cough
          sure it’s elegant, but it only makes sense if you spend decades studying programming, and don’t you think we should start actually hiring people?
          freaking nerds ruined computer infrastructure. it’s just like the ancient greeks trying to obfuscate algebra to keep the knowledge in "secret societies", except now the freaking sewage system runs on hieroglyphics and hackerman keeps shutting it off for keks

      • #198391
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >cracking the coding interview
        This and leetcode have done so much damage to the interview process
        You have jeet’s that’d get filtered by calculus if they couldn’t cheat just memorizing solutions and acting smug when you can’t cook up an obscure algorithm at the drop of a hat for a contrived problem

        • #198393
          Anonymous
          Guest

          It’s even worse, you have more than one solution, the person giving the coding tests doesn’t even know how to program, the solution won’t match their example solution prepared by the nerd department.

        • #198399
          Anonymous
          Guest

          calculus would filter me too

          • #198402
            Anonymous
            Guest

            That’s sad if you’re serious
            I’m pretty sure anyone without a learning disability could learn at least Calc II if they wanted to

        • #198404
          Anonymous
          Guest

          It’s an endless arms race with no winner. Algorithms are part of CS but being able to do scrotebrained NP-reductions or writing down tricky recursions for DP on the spot doesn’t really help in any actual real life cases, as either the problem is novel and you will not get far with basic methods taught in algorithm books or it’s already been solved and implemented better than you could do in a few months. Also these cases pop up in normal software engineering once in a blue moon.

          inspired by Shelah, i give you
          >direct reduction proof for its complexity class from SAT
          proof: check (analogous to 2.8 in [76])
          >an algorithm which is at least 2-approximation, runs at least better than any ILP implementation
          trivial
          proof: think

          Not good enough to work at OP’s neet company, sorry we won’t move forward with you.

      • #198560
        Anonymous
        Guest

        ok kid

    • #198373
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Yeah it’s baffling how basically only the top schools are producing competent workers. We hire a lot from UC Berkeley and Davis and those kids are fine, but I think something’s wrong when basically anyone below the cream of the crop is useless.

    • #198378
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Too many scrotebrains pressured into CS when they have no interest in it
      Big globohomo wants programmers but doesn’t want to pay for the skills so people who would have majored in humanities or other soft shit get memed into switching
      CS programs are also soft as fuck compared to other STEM programs

      • #198382
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >CS programs are also soft as fuck compared to other STEM programs
        Yeah I think this is a huge problem. A lot of CS programs require only one semester of calculus and absolutely no physics. People aren’t grinding their problem-solving skills all that much from the start. Also every single CS class I took had a discord server set up immediately in which people were constantly soft-cheating by sharing way too much about how to do the homework etc.

        So in the end what you’re left with is a basic-bitch java programming degree in which they mostly cheated their way through it anyway. Yeah, no shit we’re gonna check if you’d pass data structures again.

        • #198400
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >every single CS class I took had a discord server set up immediately in which people were constantly soft-cheating
          This is true for every class in current year, but even being fed answers for homework won’t save you from exams in a hard subject. The level of difficulty in CS compared to other STEM fields is just night and day

          • #198506
            Anonymous
            Guest

            well idk what uni you went to but ours crammed literally all the finals in 1.5 weeks, hard exams at that, without the possibility to repeat any of them
            so I doubt most other STEM degrees were night and day in comparison

          • #198511
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >The level of difficulty in CS compared to other STEM fields is just night and day
            This really depends. U Waterloo has one of the hardest and most effective CS undergrad programs I’ve seen. CS is hard and as hard as other stem subjects in a decent amount of schools, but people keep insisting to dumb it down

          • #198520
            Anonymous
            Guest

            I only cheat in classes that I do not need to know for my major, otherwise what is the point

      • #198395
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Why I went for EE.

        • #198397
          Anonymous
          Guest

          EE’s are chad turboautists

        • #198463
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Same. I’m going for ECE/CS double major. That way I get the full stack.

          • #198464
            Anonymous
            Guest

            imo the best option
            Plus you get to see where you truly want to work(money aside) hardware, embedded or pure software

      • #198477
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >CS programs are also soft as fuck compared to other STEM programs
        am i safe from this if i choose software engineering?
        t.about to start it

        • #198478
          Anonymous
          Guest

          If anything software "engineering" would be easier

        • #198479
          Anonymous
          Guest

          That’s even worse. It’s just CS with the hard (good) parts removed and some mediocre outdated web dev shit tacked on. That’s how it was at my school anyway.

        • #198480
          Anonymous
          Guest

          what people consider to be "harder" programs are programs with more math and abstract thinking. software engineering is going to be softer than CS, since CS degrees usually have some amount of real math and science in them

      • #198510
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >CS programs are also soft as fuck compared to other STEM programs
        Depends on where you go to school, but yes this is a problem in most programs that aren’t too 25 in undergrad.
        CS grad school is one of the toughest subjects though.
        >t. Double majored in math and CS, in a PhD program for CS now

    • #198383
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >were they ALL copying off one dude every class or something?
      Grad student who has done some TA work here (I have both designed homework problems as well as graded them). A lot of students are copying their work, but it’s generally off of sites like Chegg, rather than from other students. One of the ways you can observe this is to take take a homework problem issued in a previous year, and change some of the parameters just slightly. For instance, in a class on finite automata, I might have students design a DFA over some language which has the alphabet {a, b, c}, and in the second year, I change the alphabet to {x, y, z}. The students who look up the problem on Chegg or otherwise Google it will give an answer in terms of {a, b, c}, when there is no way for them to come up with this answer had they actually read the problem.

      Unfortunately, professors are reluctant to actually abide by the university academic honesty policy, which would require me to give a 0 for the entire assignment (not just the problem) if cheating was detected on any of the problems, and also to write the student up so that if they cheat in multiple classes… they get expelled.

    • #198384
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Odds are, you’re demanding CS degrees for stuff that doesn’t require it at all.
      CS isn’t a hard math degree, it’s a degree in learning to program and it’s been like that since the early 90s.

      • #198660
        Anonymous
        Guest

        This is the only reasonable comment in this whole thread. If OP is expecting a CS major to solve complex algo questions, you’re looking for a math major not a CS major. If you’re looking for someone to code out the algos then you want a CS major.

        Right now there is this expectation that CS majors need to be masters of multiple trades, companies will hire one CS grad when they should be hiring like 2-3 different people for that position.

        • #198663
          Anonymous
          Guest

          first off, a modulus is not a complex algo
          sorting cards is not complex either.
          but the reason these examples exist and are used is because they are very quick and easy to code a solution for IF you know the one or two tools to do it like % or arrays or ect.

          it’s literally to filter out people who either didnt pay attention in their intro to programming class or have never actually wrote anything from scratch.

          • #198667
            Anonymous
            Guest

            OP said they were asking the candidate to find the smallest vertex cover.

            • #198669
              Anonymous
              Guest

              I read that as a troll post and not OPs

            • #198674
              Anonymous
              Guest

              Dude, this isn’t even a lol math vs. CS question. Your interviewer wouldn’t give you an NP-hard problem unless they offered you a relaxation mid interview to do some approximation just to test your reasoning.

              Again, it’s really not hard. This shit follows from basic discrete you were supposed to learn but YOLO’d through because something something impractical even though discrete math is the one (1) early math class that opens up the world to solving hard problem with computers. Now you’re on about something how CS majors aren’t up to the task because their curriculum is about coding algos rather than making them. This is not true among any decent CS schools – they train CS students to be able to read, write, and analyze algos. This involves proofs and some basic math.

              But even then, interview algos require minimal math and no proof! Why are you bitching over a problem whose mundane solution is exponential in practice? They’re not out to see if you can “solve” it – they’re here to see if you can recognize that this is a fundamentally slow problem because vertex cover, dominating set, 3-SAT, and largest clique are all the same problem fundamentally that every CS student knows is canonically hard because it’s slow, not because they can’t solve it.

              TLDR stop being a scrotebrain and insisting everyone else be a scrotebrain too to support your job prospects

              • #198675
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Well, it’s not hard to solve. It’s just hard to solve efficiently.

                • #198679
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  Hard to solve colloquially means computationally difficult…which colloquially means NP-hard or simply not low poly P or BPP depending on who you ask I think

        • #198673
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >OP is expecting a CS major to solve complex algo questions,
          What?
          You’re completely wrong – CS at bad schools is a codemonkey mill, but they make an effort to teach you how to devise and analyze algos. It’s literally one of the core efforts of CS.
          Holy cope Batman, imagine wanting to be a codemonkey so much that you drag every CS student through the mud and say they don’t know or haven’t been taught how to do algorithms. Nothing they bring out during an interview is inaccessible to new undergrads

    • #198385
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >how are so many people i’m interviewing with CS degrees so freaking awful at this shit?
      Because it’s not worth remembering in detail outside of academia.

    • #198386
      Anonymous
      Guest

      OP is probably pretty old if he still thinks CS degrees are taught as hard math focused courseloads.

      CS today is just learning to program. I will say im in my senior year of software engineering and probably couldnt answer your question fully, though.

    • #198390
      Anonymous
      Guest

      lel, when your comptia candidates are better than degree candidates… very common

      • #198396
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Carrier-grade NAT
        I physically winced.

      • #198634
        Anonymous
        Guest

        LOL

    • #198407
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >were they ALL copying off one dude every class or something?
      Yes. Also extra credit and open book/internet tests.

      t. Graduated 2 years ago

      • #198408
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >were they ALL copying off one dude every class or something?
        we need a final solution to the beta problem

        • #198410
          Anonymous
          Guest

          The beta autists were usually decent. The most parasitic demographics were blacks and the overtly "nerdy" I HECCIN LOVE COODING! types with dyed hair and stickers on their laptops.

          • #198411
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >I’ve renamed all the branches to main and setup the problematic language checker on our pipeline

            • #198414
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >implying any of them knew what git was or how to use it
              Otherwise accurate kek

            • #198471
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >he thinks a fresh college grad will know how to use a CI/CD pipeline

          • #198418
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >the overtly "nerdy" I HECCIN LOVE COODING! types with dyed hair and stickers on their laptops
            these people drive me insane, they’re everywhere in web dev and incapable of any other field

            • #198428
              Anonymous
              Guest

              um im one of those guys and certainly not in web dev. infosec baby

    • #198419
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Damn so the "everyone is scrotebrained but me look I am a genius" insufferable coding scrotes are on LULZ too huh

      • #198420
        Anonymous
        Guest

        first day here?

      • #198421
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I’m 100% scrotebrained but at least I can use for loops and understand linked lists

        • #198424
          Anonymous
          Guest

          What’s the practical application of a linked list, besides stack implementation? Almost all operations have linear time complexity…

          • #198427
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Passing DS&A?

            • #198431
              Anonymous
              Guest

              No, I’m studying networking & infosec. I participated in some programming competitions a few years ago, though.

              • #198439
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Ok. That doesn’t change the fact that you need to understand linked lists to get a CS degree.

                • #198443
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  I know how linked lists work. I don’t understand the benefit, though.

                  • #198444
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    There is like 0 benefits, it’s a meme only useful for scrotebrained monkeys, in the first place it’s only a label for an "array" that contains a struct that also contains a pointer to another element in the "array", the only benefit is in specific rare queue, different combinations of pointers in the struct lead to different labels of memes also hardly ever useful.

                    • #198447
                      Anonymous
                      Guest
                    • #198457
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      Just because you can’t think of a good use case doesn’t mean everyone else is dumber than you.
                      What data structure are you going to use to create and insert an element between two others in O(1)?

                      • #198458
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        It’s not O(1), you imbecile. It’s O(n) where n is the index of insertion (because you still gotta iterate to that point to change pointers).

                      • #198459
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        you don’t need to iterate over the list every time, you can store a pointer to the element you want to insert after
                        >>"hurr durr, lemme just shift the entire array every time I want to insert an element!"
                        literally you right now

                      • #198461
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >he doesn’t have an oracle that can solve any problem in any complexity class in O(1)

                        GMI status: N

                      • #198465
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        At which freaking point do you insert multiple things at the same point in the middle of an array?

                      • #198466
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Thats the point, YOU SHOULDNT BE
                        You use data structures as needed, and usually in conjunction i.e. an array of pointers to nodes in a linked list to construct a LFU cache

                      • #198467
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        You’re right. Sorry for lashing out, anon, sleep deprivation is getting the best of me.

                      • #198468
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        were all frens here

                      • #198470
                        Anonymous
                        Guest
                      • #198460
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Dude have you ever taken a decent systems programming or DS&algos class(in c or c++)?

                      • #198476
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        usually when you have a linked list you already have a reference to the node you want to insert after/before.

                        […]

                        I go to a pretty ok uni and the people here are braindead in even their 4th years. the vast majority of people in college don’t care including the teachers. they will bitch and moan about learning even the smallest thing, never learn anything except when they cram before the test and immediately fail to retain anything the next day, and they all have such piss poor reasoning capacity that they seem to actively avoid developing that its a miracle they’ve made it this far. luckily it seems a lot of people have been filtered but the majority here still deserve to get filtered but haven’t.

                      • #198462
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        The other guy isn’t me, that’s why I said it’s only good in specific queue shit, are you doing that insertion constantly, then yes it may be a good option, may, otherwise just take the slowdown once scrotebrain.

                  • #198446
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    Linked lists are mostly useful as an example of a link-woke af data structure. Generally when I’m implementing something link-woke af I’m doing the linking myself, not using an explicit built in linked list implementation.

                    CS programs cover them so much because they’re a stepping stone to things like trees and graphs, which are (sometimes) link woke af. It’s also good practice of pointer fuckery which is always good.

      • #198423
        Anonymous
        Guest

        shut the fuck up pranjeetaravaanja

        • #198425
          Anonymous
          Guest

          cope or seethe. call it

          • #198426
            Anonymous
            Guest

            anyone who struggled with a CS curriculum is an honorary NON-white

            • #198429
              Anonymous
              Guest

              CS as a whole is easy. I switched to math for an actual challenge. Math is where true Aryan Chads gather.

              • #198513
                Anonymous
                Guest

                >Modern Math is where true gnomish Chads gather.
                Fixed that for you.

      • #198483
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Seriously? Most people in CS have a superiority complex today because they were bullied, or weren’t the cool kids of the class.

        A lot of CS majors are the 15-year old forum moderator of today.

    • #198433
      Anonymous
      Guest

      LULZ is so freaking insecure about being too stupid to grind just a few hours of leetcode so they can check the box lmao

      • #198434
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Same shit happens on LULZ when you make threads about fighting game inputs, or /ck/ when you make a thread about cooking a steak medium-rare without freaking it up. Dozens of replies of unironic copium, brainlets screeching "it doesn’t matter fuck you fuck you fuck you". LULZ in general is full of people who suck at their hobbies, it’s funny as hell.

      • #198435
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I made an account on leetcode and then tried to do the very first easy problem (Two Sum) and couldn’t.

        • #198436
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >human beings are akshually incapable of learning things
          >i should just be able to do things right away and if i can’t then that means it’s gay and stupid

          • #198437
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Yeah even ignoring that most of LULZ is stuck in a fixed-mindset in regards to technical skills, you have to remember most people here have programming ability equivalent to like half a semester at a shitty java mill and they’ve just been riding it for years.

            Ideally you try leetcode after taking data structures (and doing well), which is usually second-year. So people who spend all day refreshing LULZ while working on some dumb toy project in javascript get insta-filtered and then show up in these threads to cry.

        • #198442
          Anonymous
          Guest

          I looked at it and an clicked a random problem, 42 since it was in that movie, reasoned the logic in like 2 minutes and closed tab since you need to make an account when attempting to run it. This is "Hard" apparently…

          • #198448
            Anonymous
            Guest

            You managed to express the entire personality of LULZ in one reply.

            • #198451
              Anonymous
              Guest

              It really is easy though? I’ll try to remember how I reasoned it. You just need to loop through the array, keep a counter of a saved index of the index, look for first number, save the index and number, look for next number equal or greater than first, save it as max, go back to earlier index + 1, subtract the lowest number by next index in a counter, repeat until end and return the counter.

              • #198453
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Though I suppose that is missing the edge case where the highest number is the first but easy enough to fix…

        • #198455
          Anonymous
          Guest

          I got BTFO by an easy (two sum I think as well) and then did a hard problem in 5 minutes and scored within the top 3 percentiles.
          The site was dreamed up by the utterly deranged.

      • #198449
        Anonymous
        Guest

        My hate stems from the fact that I have to work with autists that obsess about useless crap such as vertex cover, clique, or sat but are complete and utter shit at actual development. I have to carry them constantly and fix the garbage they write.
        It grinds my gears like nothing else that solving puzzles is hailed as the pinnacle of developer prowess. And it is not a fox and the grapes situation. I am a PhD and went through the gauntlet. I just have developed an immense disdain because I see how meaningless the theory is. All of these spergs that know how to solve leetcode but have nothing else going for them pull the industry down. No practical problem solving capabilities, no sense how to design software in a long-lasting and stable way, no passion for the field.

        • #198650
          Anonymous
          Guest

          what languages do you like the most?

      • #198472
        Anonymous
        Guest

        This Holy shit

      • #198613
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >just a few hours of leetcode
        it’s about a month or two of preparation. most people go into the interview with somewhere between 150-300 questions solved

        I made an account on leetcode and then tried to do the very first easy problem (Two Sum) and couldn’t.

        it’s a skill that you need to grind.

        I looked at it and an clicked a random problem, 42 since it was in that movie, reasoned the logic in like 2 minutes and closed tab since you need to make an account when attempting to run it. This is "Hard" apparently…

        >reasoned the logic in like 2 minutes and closed tab since you need to make an account when attempting to run it.
        implementation is important. it’s one thing to say "just use dijkstras" but if you can’t write it down for your interviewer then you didn’t actually use it

    • #198445
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Because there are basically only three types of CS students:

      1. High (or not) functioning autists who finished every assignment in about 30 mins and then went back to programming their personal project

      2. People who just aren’t cut out for it. They attend every lab and TA help session, take hours to do every assignment, have trouble grasping the concept of pointers, and barely understand the basic syntax of the language, and struggle to understand when or why you would exercise any language feature that exists to isolate or encapsulate logic, like making a separate function or creating another class.

      3. Future grad students. Easily identified by being good at programming while not having autism. Unfortunately their masochism destines them to a life of academia.

      There’s also the rare fourth type of person who is both socially capable and good at programming but you’re not going to meet them on LULZ so I’ll spare you the explanation of them.

      • #198450
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I am 1 and also a CS tutor. There are so many students who are a 2 that come in for tutoring. I just want to tell them to drop the major because they’re obviously not cut out for it, but I don’t want to do that.
        I really hope they are not able to enter the workforce

      • #198473
        Anonymous
        Guest

        4th type of programmer:
        >stoner
        >gym bro
        >always played video games and good at computers
        >decent programming
        >Cs get degrees
        >Gets FANG job and climb hierarchy really quickly

        • #198571
          Anonymous
          Guest

          fuck this is me without the stoner part

        • #198576
          Anonymous
          Guest

          fuck this is me without the stoner part

          Wassup bros.
          Gina from HR just left my desk after an hour. She came by to discuss my raise and I talked her into a trip to the Dominican.
          Her husband will understand, I told her that her fat ass needs a real man to plough and she giggled and said she’d write me up (then whispered ‘in the board room in 5 minutes’) and shit was so cash.
          Ranjeet or Pajoot or whatever the fuck his name is said he’d close my tickets since I explained stochastic optimization to him in 5 minutes this morning. Great guy.

      • #198504
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >and struggle to understand when or why you would exercise any language feature that exists to isolate or encapsulate logic
        I’m at this part studying on my own. I haven’t done data and algorithms yet so I just cope thinking it’s because I still lack programming logic.

      • #198536
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I was a 2 because I didn’t care in college and now I try hard, and make 150k will soon be at FAANG

    • #198469
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I’m hardware so probably doesn’t freaking matter to me for interviews, but do you care about syntax in interviews? Like do you ask people to write a python script and then get mad if they don’t use the correct function name?
      I frequently switch between VHDL, Verilog, C, Python, C#, HTML, and sometimes C++. I can’t always remember which the exact syntax for matrix splicing is in a particular language

    • #198474
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I’m a self taught Pythonlet and currently taking some grad CS classes that include upper-level undergrads, and skill-wise I’m about even with these zoomer scrotes. But they’re almost certainly cheating, woke af on the fact that most will show up to every lecture only to pay zero attention and fuck around on their laptop instead. It’s mostly the fault of the garbage higher education system though. Professors don’t give a fuck about teaching anymore (or more likely, don’t have the time to give a fuck).

    • #198482
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >were they ALL copying off one dude every class or something?

      Yes. They copy-pasted almost all of their code from StackOverflow, then spent 6 hours studying random bullshit so they couls get good grades.

      A large majority of CS students never learn programming. Their sole focus is to get a degree.
      It’s extremely sad.

    • #198485
      Anonymous
      Guest

      University/college is shit

    • #198487
      Anonymous
      Guest

      What job are u hiring that even needs to use calculus?? Name one real world example when a developer would need to use calculus.

      • #198574
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Any optimization problem with a continuous variable you’d like to get rid off before applying the heuristic YTpipo juju

    • #198488
      The Falcon
      Guest
      • #198491
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Post a Reply
        oh thank god I thought this thread was talking about me

      • #198498
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I haven’t laughed this hard in awhile.

      • #198575
        Anonymous
        Guest

        https://i.imgur.com/RNHshiY.gif

        this just straight up cured my imposter syndrome

        • #198590
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >le impostor syndrome
          You’re not good enough to have impostor syndrome.
          The fact that scrotebrains exist doesn’t mean that you’re any better. Their existence doesn’t make any problems out there any easier.
          Fuck off.

      • #198578
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Questions like this
        >I can’t even land interview
        So, are they lying to HR which is too stupid to catch it?
        Or am I just that bad? ;'(

      • #198580
        Anonymous
        Guest

        i want more

      • #198584
        Anonymous
        Guest

        thanks man this just convinced me to go ahead and start submitting applications

      • #198595
        Anonymous
        Guest

        How do odd numbers filter so many people lol

        • #198600
          Anonymous
          Guest

          it filtered you. write it.

          • #198658
            Anonymous
            Guest

            not that person, I dont remember syntax and haven’t wrote a line of code in 4 years
            for(int i=0,i<100,i++){ if(i%2 == 1){print(i);}}

        • #198640
          The Falcon
          Guest

          "Write the odd numbers between 0 and 100" is an ultra easy question… and yet, it requires:

          1- A proper loop
          2- A proper conditional
          3a- The usage of the remainder operator, its equivalent, OR
          3b- Proper setup of the loop

          Each of these, on its own, is trivial. Combining the the three steps requires slightly more effort than "go to class, breathe, get degree".

          who wrote this? no freaking way this real

          I wrote this. These are all answers from various interviews I have conducted.

          • #198641
            The Falcon
            Guest

            >"go to class, breathe, get degree".
            Or, since we are in 2021: "go to koding bootkamp for 2 weeks, breathe, get cert".

          • #198643
            Anonymous
            Guest

            I don’t understand. What could people in a bootcamp possibly spend their time on that doesn’t enable them to solve this problem? Let alone an entire degree – I know Cs earn degrees but there’s no way you can pass an exam without meeting some minimum threshold of competence.

            • #198644
              Anonymous
              Guest

              somebody told me they had to interact with a pajeet who worked as a windows os admin, that didn’t know how to uninstall shit
              let that sink in

            • #198646
              The Falcon
              Guest

              I have talked to some students:

              – students come to college to party
              – teachers simply have slides up, and read the slides
              – in the rare cases where some teaching/learning is attempted: student memorize answers to select questions. Deviating (even slightly) from these questions leads to chaos

              • #198648
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Weird. Community colleges I suppose?

                • #198659
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  anon, I…

          • #198664
            Anonymous
            Guest

            how much more in-depth do your interviews go? what kind of positions are these for?

            • #198672
              The Falcon
              Guest

              Pic related is how far it gets. If you can shuffle a deck and draw two random cards, you are hired.

              • #198677
                Anonymous
                Guest

                >make array containing every card value
                >make two ints
                >random first int between 0 and 51
                >random second int between 0 and 51
                >enter a loop to check if second int is equal to first, if it isnt, then break the loop
                >print the array position of each int as your two cards.
                or do you actually want the array itself randomized and you draw the first two cards?
                you can also just not have an array and just nig together something like
                >two ints
                >rand 0-3 first
                >rand 1-13 second
                >if second is 1 do print("ace of") else if <11 do print(second, "of") else if 11 do print("jack of") ect ect
                >if first is 0 do print("clubs") else if 1 do print("spades") else if 2 do a else if 3 do b
                >reroll the two ints, if the first and second are the same, reroll both till one is different, then re-run the same if statements

                • #198685
                  The Falcon
                  Guest

                  >the array itself randomized and you draw the first two cards?
                  That is the more efficient way. The question was to make the array, shuffle, draw two cards.

                  Picking random numbers and checking and re-rolling if they are the same is not efficient.

                  • #198686
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    for 52 cards, sure, but what if there is 43 trillion different card types.
                    neither would be very efficient, but figuring out how to generate card values randomly like in my second example would be closer to the right way i think

      • #198599
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I love this man’s candor

        • #198647
          Anonymous
          Guest

          straight out bash.org

      • #198601
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Ok, frens beat me up. I’ve been coding for about eight weeks and decided to try the deck of cards question without looking anything up. I’m absolutely confident that I bonked up at least the map and random parts of this.

        • #198602
          Anonymous
          Guest

          anon, this is the most genius code I’ve ever seen in my 30 years. would you be interested in a senior developer position at facebook with starting salary 700k/year + benefits?

        • #198604
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >no shuffle
          Dear Anon,

          Thank you very much for your interest in employment opportunities with LULZ. I am writing to inform you that we have selected the candidate whom we believe most closely matches the job requirements of the position. We appreciate you taking the time to interview with us and wish you the best of luck in your future endeavors.

          Best regards,
          /g/

          • #198606
            Anonymous
            Guest

            Wait, I thought shuffle just meant get a random card. Is there a standard way to shuffle all the elements of an array? It would have made way more sense to do that and just output the first two elements after

            • #198607
              Anonymous
              Guest

              I’m just joking. The assignment did say "shuffle the deck and then draw two cards at random," which would imply first rearranging the array at random and then selecting two cards at random after that, to be painstakingly autistic about it.

        • #198605
          Anonymous
          Guest

          you’re ngmi LOL

        • #198609
          Anonymous
          Guest

          cool.
          didn’t bother to shuffle the deck though, tbf it isn’t necessary but if you were for example writing code for a card game it would be better imo to represent the positions of the cards literally.
          also in production code imo it would be better to do essentially what the dude that wrote each card out manually did. except for the scrotebrained second part
          bugs start to sneak in when you do too many things programmatically. someone asks for a deck for Pinochle mode so you write another function "make_pinochle_deck", then another designer wants you to account for if the player wants joker cards…
          when you could have just stored each deck in a json file and loaded them selecting by "deckname"
          shuffling the array prevents bugs later like if it matters what order certain cards are in for the game, some games put cards on the bottom of the deck etc.

          • #198611
            Anonymous
            Guest

            That’s a good point. Although, couldn’t you also build it to pull mix and match arrays that get joined? So a pinochle deck would still pull the same suit array, but mahjong would pull different ones for both. Although, I guess I’d have to change it to accommodate suitless cards for mahjong or jokers

            • #198614
              Anonymous
              Guest

              here’s my autistic literal interpretation:
              suits = ["D","H","C","S"]
              deck = []

              for (var i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
              for (var j = 0; j < 13; j++) {
              card = suits[i] + (j+1).toString()
              deck.push(card)
              }

              console.log(deck)

              function riffle_shuffle(deck) {
              mid = Math.ceil(deck.length/2)
              d_a = deck.splice(0, mid) // Split the deck into two piles
              d_b = deck.splice(-mid)
              for ( i = 0; i < mid; i++) {
              console.log("pppbbbttt")
              rc_a = d_a[Math.floor(Math.random() * d_a.length)] // Pick a random element
              rc_b = d_b[Math.floor(Math.random() * d_b.length)]
              deck.push(rc_a) // Put em back in the deck
              deck.push(rc_b)
              d_a = d_a.filter(item => item !== rc_a) // Remove em from the piles
              d_b = d_b.filter(item => item !== rc_b)
              }
              return deck
              }

              console.log(riffle_shuffle(deck))
              card_1 = deck[Math.floor(Math.random()*deck.length)]
              card_2 = deck[Math.floor(Math.random()*deck.length)]
              console.log(card_1)
              console.log(card_2)

              To be honest I’m surprised I made this work, I don’t even know JS.
              This is probably the dumbest thing I’ve ever coded but it makes me happy.

              • #198615
                Anonymous
                Guest

                freaking lmao the perfect shuffle

              • #198616
                Anonymous
                Guest

                Nice. Needs this too though.

                function waterfall(deck) {
                right_hand_content = deck
                left_hand_content = []
                end = right_hand_content.length
                for (i = 0; i < end ; i++) {
                left_hand_content.push(right_hand_content.pop())
                console.log("swshhhhh")
                }
                deck = left_hand_content
                return deck
                }

        • #198610
          Anonymous
          Guest

          Seems fine to me but I’m a scrotebrain. You didn’t shuffle but for this specific application it doesn’t matter. Also no idea if that’s valid syntax in whatever language you’re using but it seems fine.

          • #198612
            Anonymous
            Guest

            It’s supposed to be JavaScript

        • #198624
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >var deck = val.map(val[i],suit[i]).join()
          what the fuck are you doing
          this shit won’t even work at all and even if it did somehow work you are still raping the heap hardcore

      • #198603
        Anonymous
        Guest

        who wrote this? no freaking way this real

      • #198651
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >find all the odd numbers between 0-100
        >candidate just gives you all the numbers instead
        candidate pulled a big think, question didn’t specify only!

      • #198652
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >>Out of curiosity, I asked: "Why is the answer a double?"
        >>Candidate: "Because it needs to store the value taken from _two_ variables."
        LOOOOOOOOL

      • #198655
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I wonder how much of this is due to nervousness, due to the candidate trying to impress the interviewer and due to inexperience/incompetence

    • #198489
      Anonymous
      Guest

      as somebody in their 3rd year yes this is exactly what happens
      im scrotebrained and feel like i learned absolutely nothing but with the amount of work we get there’s not much time to try and learn on our own

      • #198492
        Anonymous
        Guest

        A big problem is this – half the coding classes are just completing projects on time. That literally constitutes 40% of my Algorithms course, and they are non stop back to back. There’s no time to engage with the material because of these projects, and because of that, there’s no time to really learn the theory behind the application.

        • #198496
          Anonymous
          Guest

          gonna take algorithms next semester hope it wont be as bad as data structures

          • #198497
            Anonymous
            Guest

            it’s worse.

            • #198499
              Anonymous
              Guest

              how much worse? and in what way exactly?

          • #198500
            Anonymous
            Guest

            your uni sucks if they decouple ds’ from algos
            they ought to be taught together in 2-3 semester series of courses, ideally taught in parallel with the hw classes where you learn (and implement a toy version of) your pipelined superscalars

            • #198501
              Anonymous
              Guest

              calm down

        • #198505
          Anonymous
          Guest

          depends on the uni. the programming in my undergrad algo course was piss easy and same in a graduate level course. the algorithms aren’t that hard and once you know the answer it is straightforward to implement it. the only hard programming assignments i encountered in course work were assignments in a graduate level specialized algorithms course that asked to optimize really hard problems where the theoretical answer isn’t even known and you just have to keep trying weird optimizaiton after weird optimization. maybe yours emphasises programming more than mine, but i could say that about 40% of my undergrad algorithms course was programming too woke af on the number of progrmaming vs nonprogrammnig questions so maybe you’re just a brainlet.

    • #198490
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >were they ALL copying off one dude every class or something?
      That and a lot of the stuff you learn to pass a test you can quickly forget because you don’t maintain it anymore.

    • #198493
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I’m about to graduate with a CS master degree from a top university (don’t want to dox myself but it’s top 10 world wide for CS) and I have written maybe 1000 line of code over the past year and don’t even remember what lectures I had last semester. CS degrees are a complete joke lol.
      People who are interested and actually make the effort to learn something during their degree probably had a job lined up before the end. Those you are interviewing are the ones like me who never even had a contact with the industry during their degree because they were doing the bare minimum.

      • #198502
        Anonymous
        Guest

        If this is omscs you’re not going to make it

    • #198494
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >actually enjoy programming, feel decent at utilising language features, can find odd programming jobs
      >struggling with algos, have to do multiple attemps to solve leetcode mediums
      >absolutely filtered by math, making mistakes even in simple calculus tasks
      >To git gut at it I probably need to spend hours practicing
      >can’t remember by heart even basic things like formula for normal distribution, have to look it up every time

      Why actual programming is so much easier than math?

      • #198495
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >can’t remember by heart even basic things like formula for normal distribution, have to look it up every time
        nobody but eidetictards do
        most people (who don’t work with them every day) just remember the idea and then it’s trivial to derive it on the spot
        that’s for written exams in uni or when you’re in da woods
        in practice you just open your Grimmett&Stirzaker (or garden gnomegle) and look it up, i really don’t get why grinding this shit would be expected anywhere
        undergrad-tier math is easy, you just have to not be a scrotebrain by remembering ideas instead of definitions
        programming is harder since it’s a craft and "just getting it" won’t help you at all with proper architecture and whatnot, it’s all about experience

      • #198518
        Anonymous
        Guest

        Because you practice programming more than you practice math. You practice programming more than math because it has greater benefits for your everyday life.

    • #198503
      Anonymous
      Guest

      haha I wrote like 20 lines of code a year in my program my final project was purely theoretical cybersecurity shit where I ran some automated tools a few times and those were the "results"
      now I’m back NEETing because I did an internship at scroteMAN and it was so soul crushing i no longer want to work in the field
      fuck cooders

    • #198514
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Just use integration by parts.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSPb1CtLLxI

    • #198515
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I saw a clip of some asian broad that double majored in math and CS that got “good grades” at UCLA and couldn’t describe anything about what she learned a year after graduating. It’s insane how stupid undergrads are, especially CS brainlets.

    • #198516
      Anonymous
      Guest

      im a professional developer and haven’t solved an integral since college.

      • #198519
        Anonymous
        Guest

        woke af

    • #198521
      Anonymous
      Guest

      got examples of the questions you ask?

    • #198522
      Anonymous
      Guest

      meanwhile college student here who can’t even get an internship interview yet know all my shit

      • #198524
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >got a job at major tech company despite being a brainlet because spic

    • #198523
      Anonymous
      Guest

      What kinds of questions do you think they should be able to answer that they can’t? I understand fizzbuzz, arrays, hashmaps, sorting, and other shit like that. Not knowing how to solve these problems is a very big red flag to me because they really only rely on your knowledge of hashing, pointers, and other baby shit that you just need to know.

      HOWEVER: dynamic programming, advanced graph theory, advanced backtracking, and just about anything that can be classified at LC hard is stupid, and you’re a bad interviewer for asking stuff like this unless you’re literally at Google. Interviewers at no-name companies who ask DP are just insecure losers trying to boost their confidence by watching someone squirm through an irrelevant hazing ritual. If you ask these types of questions for no reason, you’re just a dick, pure and simple, and I’d hate to have to sit next to you during the daily stand up and watch you pretend to be a professional.

      • #198525
        Anonymous
        Guest

        …dynamic programming isn’t hard. once you understand some of the harder problems that reduce to rod cutting, it’s actually one of the easiest ways to solve hard problems.

        • #198527
          Anonymous
          Guest

          It’s also just a mathematical property of recurrence relations, which has fuck-all to do with anything you did at work yesterday. Using it as an interview data point is absurd. I don’t care who spent the past three months glued to their desk, grinding leetcode hards rather than gaining relevant domain experience.

          • #198530
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >which has fuck-all to do with anything you did at work yesterday
            This really depends on where you work and what you’re doing. Most software positions don’t have you do anything much, but the places where you’re working with aerospace/aeuronautical, cryptosystems, R&D, optimization, etc etc.. Not every job is just software fundamentals to write boiler plate or to resolve frameworks and existing libraries together.

            For a more relatable answer, it’s because DP is
            1) a very powerful technique to solve hard problems easily
            2) taught standard to CS undergrads
            and so it’s an effective way to vet CS undergrads who paid attention or went to good programs vs. those who didn’t. You’re trying to judge CS majors on their reasoning ability by giving them a question phrased in a language and material they’re familiar with.

            • #198531
              Anonymous
              Guest

              what is the path to getting an R&D or optimization or whatever other job that requires you to go beyond software fundamentals?

              • #198533
                Anonymous
                Guest

                If your CS program is good, internships and research experience. If it isn’t, double major or minor with math and then do internships and get research experience.
                You will eventually need to get a PhD if you really care about staying in research and moving up. But to break into it? You don’t need to start with it.

                • #198538
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  I have internships and research experience, and am in a good CS program. But I assume that if I apply to a typical SWE job, even at scroteman, it won’t be that interesting. If I don’t want to do actual algorithm research as a phd/beyond, what kind of software positions tend to be interesting wrt algorithms?

            • #198535
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >Most software positions don’t have you do anything much, but the places where you’re working with aerospace/aeuronautical, cryptosystems, R&D, optimization, etc etc..
              Sure, but that’s the exception. My younger cousin is a college junior who told me he’s asked DP for internship positions at web startups. DP simply has nothing to do with the typical software job, so it shouldn’t become the norm.

              >DP is an effective way to vet CS undergrads who paid attention or went to good programs vs. those who didn’t
              Hard disagree. My algos class spent two days covering knapsack, then we moved on. That was a decade ago. I shouldn’t have to crack open a textbook and read about shit I have used zero times since then when applying to a random code monkey position

              >Not every job is just software fundamentals to write boiler plate or to resolve frameworks and existing libraries together
              But most are, and that’s my whole point.

              • #198544
                Anonymous
                Guest

                >Hard disagree. My algos class spent two days covering knapsack, then we moved on
                That’s weird, since my algo class gave us some hard DP problems before moving on. We covered most stuff from DFT/FFT to vEB trees.

                • #198545
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  Maybe that’s the problem here, then. I used to be able to solve harder DP problems back when I job searched last <2 years ago. I remember feeling bitter the entire time because I’d rather have been doing anything else, but I grinded, interviewed, and got offers. I’ve literally only had to think about DP when leetcode is pulled up in my browser or if I’m interviewing with someone who seems fresh out of college. A dumb metric in my opinion. Just give me a difficult problem that you don’t expect me to solve but that doesn’t require esoteric knowledge, and watch me react to ambiguity. That’s much harder to do right than just randomly grabbing a dp problem a few seconds before joining the interview, which is probably why it isn’t common.

          • #198532
            Anonymous
            Guest

            >It’s also just a mathematical property of recurrence relations
            I mean this is a vacuous statement. Recursion is a mathematical property of higher order functions but we still expect undergrads to know how to recursively (and iteratively) go through a tree. Just because the tool is deep or removed from mundanities doesn’t make it irrelevant. This is like saying:
            >probability is a mathematical property of infinite sets and dedekind cuts in analysis
            >so wtf, why are they asking me a probability question for this ML engineer position???

            • #198540
              Anonymous
              Guest

              >Recursion is a mathematical property of higher order functions but we still expect undergrads to know how to recursively (and iteratively) go through a tree
              Recursion also doesn’t take weeks of practice to be able to understand the common use cases. It took me and everyone else in my intro programming class a couple of days to get it, and I haven’t forgotten. Go scan through your old algos notes and look at the parts about DP. Do you think those notes are enough to solve LC hard DP problems? I’d guess not. I don’t think these topics are remotely equivalent. One is taught in the actual first class you’ll ever take in uni and is then reiterated in every subsequent course, and the other is a subtopic of a one-off class.

              >Just because the tool is deep or removed from mundanities doesn’t make it irrelevant
              Strawman. If your work requires intimate DP knowledge, I encourage you to use candidates’ ability to solve these problems as a data point. CRUD devs make up most the engineers at most companies. These scrotebrains need to know algos 101 at the very most, and harder DP aren’t included in that.

              >>probability is a mathematical property of infinite sets and dedekind cuts in analysis
              >>so wtf, why are they asking me a probability question for this ML engineer position???
              Would you be okay if your backend dev onsite included a round in which you debugged a neural net? Why not?

              • #198546
                Anonymous
                Guest

                >Do you think those notes are enough to solve LC hard DP problems?
                No, because LC hard problems usually take a combination of technical knowledge and some problem solving techniques and a lot of insight on how to stretch them.
                >the other is a subtopic of a one-off class.
                I mean, sorta? If your program is good, DP should be a common solution to what you’re working with because it’s all just about choosing the order of subproblems in a way that makes the problem easy. If you didn’t get this out of your DP material, and see DP questions as bullshit, I’d argue you don’t really understand why it’s there in the first place
                >most engineers are bad
                news at 11, we all complain about the industry and people who suck, but also complain about places having higher standards.
                >debug a neural net
                No, I’m asking them to give me some indication they understand ML beyond just framework monkey. I’m asking for an ML engineer who has ostensibly taken classes in and understands ML at an undergrad level excellently. If I wanted a framework monkey, I’d have put down "doesn’t need experience in ML, but willing to learn" rather than a full job listing for ML engineer. You should be able to answer basic probability questions related to common NN architectures, markov chains, etc.. Nothing too deep. Mostly all practical.

                • #198548
                  Anonymous
                  Guest

                  >No, because LC hard problems usually take a combination of technical knowledge and some problem solving techniques and a lot of insight on how to stretch them
                  Then why is it being used to gauge competence for nondescript entry-level positions? How can DP simultaneously be just a cursory look at something you claim every dev should know while also requiring extensive additional context and practice?

                  >If you didn’t get this out of your DP material, and see DP questions as bullshit, I’d argue you don’t really understand why it’s there in the first place
                  I’m not gonna roll around in the mud with you about whether I can personally solve these problems because that’s worthless. Let me remind you of something that seen to have forgotten, though: what you learned in your CS undergrad isn’t contractually obligated to be relevant to corporate software development, so you can’t keep pointing out that it’s there for inherently obvious reasons and insisting that deep dives into it are justified 10 years post-graduation. I also took linear algebra. If my interviewer were to ask me problems from that final, I’d probably fail. I’m genuinely not sure whether you’d consider this just.

                  >we all complain about the industry and people who suck, but also complain about places having higher standards
                  What’s your point? I’m saying that devs at random startups are expected to solve these problems. I know this first hand having interviewed a lot over the past few years, and I’m as confused now as I was then.

                  >No, I’m asking them to give me some indication they understand ML beyond just framework monkey. I’m asking for an ML engineer who has ostensibly taken classes in and understands ML at an undergrad level excellentl
                  Yes, for a job that will require knowledge ML knowledge. Hard DP problems are far more niche to a typical dev than a neural net is to an ML engineer. You’ve missed the point.

                  • #198549
                    Anonymous
                    Guest

                    >Then why is it being used to gauge competence for nondescript entry-level positions?
                    because the people who give out LC problems, like google, are looking for people who can solve these problems even partially under pressure. they don’t expect you to know everything that’s esoteric, but DP is not esoteric and should always be on your toolbelt.
                    >: what you learned in your CS undergrad isn’t contractually obligated to be relevant to corporate software development, so you can’t keep pointing out that it’s there for inherently obvious reasons and insisting that deep dives into it are justified 10 years post-graduation. I
                    while i sympathize with you, your post is a lot of words to say the following:
                    >i’m seething because i forgot the basics and are being quizzed on them during interviews
                    >i just want to do codemonkeying and expect to be quizzed on codemonkeying
                    >no jobs i want probably use this
                    again i sympathize, but i don’t really agree with this line of thinking. I would expect you to be able to do a basic linear algebra question if you want the title of "engineer" on your paystub.
                    >Yes, for a job that will require knowledge ML knowledge. Hard DP problems are far more niche to a typical dev than a neural net is to an ML engineer. You’ve missed the point.
                    except a "hard" DP problem isn’t niche. Most DP problems that actually matter in industry are the harder ones, but you should be able to see how to use it immediately. you shouldn’t be quizzed on things only relevant every single hour of your job but on how to think outside the box. You sound like a dev who wants an engineer’s pay without putting in the time to be a freaking engineer.

                    • #198550
                      Anonymous
                      Guest

                      Look, my man, I’ll give it to you straight. You obviously don’t understand this industry if you think DP is a requirement for competent devs. I’ve been programming since the 90s, anything from C to Rust. I’ve been with startups that went under, others that IPO’d, and so on. Since your scope of reason is unflinchingly narrow, I’m gonna go out on a tangent and assume that you’re either a new grad or a self-important FAANG dev who drank the kool-aid. Either way, you’re boring to talk to, and I’m not gonna waste my lunch break discussing your wrong opinion with you.

                      DP beyond simple arrays and strings is just unprofessional for any company that isn’t up to their tits in good applications, which I’d pretty much just FAANG, fintech, and unicorns. If you ask a complex DP problem in any other interview, you need to curb your self importance.

                      Also, a big fat L-O-freaking-L from me that you’ve somehow managed to argue in favor of DP as a workplace essential despite failing to come up with a few actual examples of its utility. Grow up.

                      t. 10+ YOE, former Amazon and Google

                      • #198551
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        You’re so focused on DP when the point is to be able to study DP for 1 hour to remember and to do like 3-5 DP problems in prep for an interview. It doesn’t take a week. You’re dramatically overselling this skill.
                        >you’re a faang dev
                        I did software engineering for a bit, thought it was boring, and switched to computational optics. I “do” software as a part of my job but I’m expected to be an engineer first and foremost. I get really pissed when people keep asking the industry to lower standards because muh seniority or muh codemonkey. You can go for jobs that allow that, but kindly keep me out of you dumbing down the work and increasing the gap between software and real engineering.
                        >Either way, you’re boring to talk to, and I’m not gonna waste my lunch break discussing your wrong opinion with you.
                        You’ve spent your entire lunch break seething over an undergrad problem that should take at most 2 days to review but realistically just a couple of hours.
                        You should be able to be a big boy and learn the interview material again.
                        >DP beyond simple strings
                        Are you stupid? Do you think DP is a concept that’s used to optimize string operations and exclusively boring interview questions? DP is a mundane tool used in optimization, fintech, computer vision, routing and networks, etc. It’s a very basic tool that lets you solve practical problems easily.
                        You sound like a baby who hasn’t solved any actual problems except how to push and pull from a db for some business logic. Seethe more as the expectations to be an engineer far outstrip the bare minimum you rode on years ago. It takes more than being able to write basic bitch code to get and keep a job now.

                      • #198553
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Not the person you’re talking to. I see where you are coming from. I personally really like algorithms, math, etc. But I also feel that the interview should match the job. As someone who likes this kind of stuff, I feel disappointed when I have to go through an interview that tests me on some complicated algo solution, and then when I get to the actual job, I’m just calling libraries and writing boilerplate. Increasing interview difficulty on frankly irrelevant topics seems like a rather contrived way to increase the quality of engineers. Why are so many cs jobs soulless when the interview would lead you to believe otherwise?

                      • #198554
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >Why are so many cs jobs soulless when the interview would lead you to believe otherwise?
                        Because most of them are not CS jobs but software dev jobs that need legions of people who are interested in mashing libraries together to do so while keeping best practice for their software. In short, they need codemonkeys to bookkeep for them

                      • #198559
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        And we need applicants for these jobs to know DP, why? I would think testing interviewees on software design principles would be more relevant.

                      • #198567
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Because, as all the non larpers in the thread know, I, a hypothetical or potential interviewer, know the interview process usually asks for both during different rounds. I want an engineer who isn’t intimidated by their schoolwork, even if they’re rusty, because the times it shows up, it’s important. More often than not, *some* use of material that might or might not be DP rears its head at more than decent places, especially Amazon or google, and I want to know I hired someone who can actually deal with it. Being able to do what you learned in school (to a reasonable degree) is important. Unless you do computational science or lab stuff, I don’t really ask you to compute a derivative. I ask you to use a common technique for solving a self similar problem quickly with a computer, and one that’s pretty short to implement too.

                        You’re acting as though the interview process doesn’t ask people to be good at both. You can be good at software design but still fail at being able to solve problems, and I have like 15 other applicants who are good at both that I’d rather take. Stop seething and pick up the textbook.

                      • #198594
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        How long have you been working? How many friends do you have at work?

                      • #198582
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Because being an """architect""" is a freaking meme and all modern software is slow as fuck because you scrotebrains are incapable of finding sensible heuristics or memoizing work. Get out of my field you freaking imposter.

                      • #198638
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Is this actually true? Just turn some O(n^2)s into O(n log n)s and memoize stuff and modern software would be fixed?

                      • #198552
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >You obviously don’t understand this industry if you think DP is a requirement for competent devs
                        You’re missing the point of you think DP is vetting for good devs because of the immediate use everywhere. You, a software engineer, at any point in your career, should be able to interview and solve a basic DP problem. This doesn’t mean being able to use DP all the time or everywhere, but you should be able to pick up a book for a couple of hours and relearn this shit very quickly. Half the interview is about relevant skills. Half the interview is asking whether you did your homework again and can competitively solve questions that test problem solving under pressure.

                      • #198561
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        >Wrong
                        >Opinion
                        Ok code monkey don’t you have job to do?

                      • #198562
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Wait, you’re not even a senior after those years of development? Lol what a loser

                      • #198563
                        Anonymous
                        Guest

                        Being an intern and junior for 10 years is not a big achievement, quit larping, your senior wants your code done by next week monke

    • #198528
      Anonymous
      Guest

      At calculus? Software kiddies might not into integration by parts or product rule, but it’s literally just a casual requirement to be able to analyze runtimes in algorithms…
      https://www2.math.upenn.edu/~wilf/DownldGF.html
      https://aofa.cs.princeton.edu/home/
      Both of these are largely the analyzing all algorithms you could analyze as just an undergrad. This is largely the practical reason to learn calc 1 + 2.

      The practical reasons to learn calc 3 and 4 are machine learning / all of optimization and robotics / computational science respectively. The problem is that CS programs that aren’t top 30 or so are only interested in pushing out coders and not engineers / applied mathematicians-in-training.

    • #198534
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Welcome to the American education where you study "IT" and take the easiest possible classes then just copy paste the homework or pay Indians to do their assignments.

    • #198537
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Depends on the questions. If it is some obscure part of the language that is almost never used then yeah you’ll have failure. If its implementing the best solution on the fly you’ll have failure. Programming isn’t a speed test and it shouldn’t be treated like one.

    • #198555
      Anonymous
      Guest

      what position are you trying to fill?

    • #198565
      Anonymous
      Guest

      People are just freaking lazy anon. I know people who don’t even know what a zip file is. Another had an emotional breakdown when trying to figure out Linux.

    • #198577
      Anonymous
      Guest

      wait did anyone actually have a technical interview where he had to solve some shitty analysis 1 question? I would walk out because that’s embarrassing

    • #198579
      Anonymous
      Guest

      bros how do I get a job as a server monkey starting from scratch?

      • #198583
        Anonymous
        Guest

        I used to sell homework on the side. I had ads on craigslist and yikyak and would usually charge $50-$100 for CS assignments depending on the difficulty. I wonder what these people are up to nowadays.

        Get certs and find an internship

    • #198581
      Anonymous
      Guest

      I wish I majored in physics

    • #198588
      Anonymous
      Guest

      This thread makes me depressed because I am that CS brainlet. I don’t know if I should blame it on school where the professors outright don’t give a shit and just send me online links to read or I’m just painfully slow and scrotebrained. It feels like I need to practice and study 24/7 to be as competent as some anons here.

      • #198591
        Anonymous
        Guest

        that’s because you’re taking a passive mindset to learning whereas those anons are being proactive.

        • #198592
          Anonymous
          Guest

          >you’re taking passive mindset to learning whereas those anons are being proactive
          Never thought of it that way. Guess I really have no excuse then. Thanks anon.

    • #198593
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Op it’s probably you that is wrong, not the entire American education system. Sorry but you need to hear this. You are failing as a technical interviewer, probably because you are having trouble with successfully communicating the problem.

    • #198597
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Is a CS degree just the gold rush of the 21st century? Graduating high school this year and out of the 600 students in our class almost 1/4th want to major in either comp sci/comp eng. (according to school-wide survey). Why are they continuing to push programming and CS on us? Is there really that much of a demand?

      • #198598
        Anonymous
        Guest

        >Why are they continuing to push programming and CS on us? Is there really that much of a demand?
        Recruiters literally come and beg to fresh CS graduates to join their company. There is literally not enough demand for competent programmers or even programmers in general.

    • #198608
      Anonymous
      Guest

      as a rule I only hire people woke af on what I can see they’ve done and what they demonstrate.
      people with only a BSc in CS really don’t fit that at all.
      a guy that did Cs in HS and dropped out but has a lot to show in what I’m interested in is clearly and obviously the better pick plus other factors.

    • #198617
      Anonymous
      Guest

      What type of questions are talking about exactly

    • #198618
      Anonymous
      Guest

      because solving timed meme puzzles under pressure while the interviewer looks at you is surprisingly hard, especially if you’re socially inept or autistic like most of us

    • #198632
      Anonymous
      Guest

      >most people arent smart
      who wod of thot?
      t. scrotebrain who. cant solve simple captcha

    • #198636
      Anonymous
      Guest

      What OP and people like him want is now called applied and computational math.
      CS is now just webdev, and internet social issues.

    • #198642
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Do other industries suffer from this?
      If an ad goes out for an accountant, do they get flooded with hopeless applicants who don’t understand tax brackets?
      Do senior electrician vacancies get interviewees showing up who’ve never wired a plug?

    • #198645
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Because universities in 2021 are for literal scrotebrains

    • #198653
      Anonymous
      Guest

      College is a key to a better life and there’s basically zero efforts to stop cheating. People cheat all the freaking time.

    • #198654
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Because american education is laughable

    • #198661
      Anonymous
      Guest

      If I knew you’d ask me about calculus I would read up on that to refresh my memory. I’ve forgot how to do it by hand

    • #198665
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Is there much computational difference between %2 in a loop vs bitwise AND with 1 in a loop

      • #198670
        Anonymous
        Guest

        any compiler worth using would optimize that

        this is what happens when you teach people nothing but sorting algorithms and webdev for 4 years

    • #198666
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Applying to jobs sucks because of brainlet that flood applications and waste people’s time. Took me way longer to job hop because of that to finally get a phone interview. Luckily I’m not a brainlet and social sperg and every interview I’ve gone to so far landed me offers. You guys are missing the point that these problems are to show if you can effectively communicate your thought process to others because working in real life is a collaborative endeavor. Being a spergy programmer lone wolf doesn’t lead to a good teammate

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