“All I want for Christmas is full Communism now,” wrote BuzzFeed’s science editor Kelly Oakes on Sunday.

Her remarks prompted many to inform her about the failures of communism and the suffering wrought by communist regimes.

Following her tweet, Oakes was swiftly picked apart by the untamed James Woods, who slammed Oakes’ remarks in very few words.

Woods’ tweet was widely shared on Twitter, prompting even more criticism to be directed at her. Unable to justify her remarks, Oakes made her Twitter account private.

Corpses found in 1979 at a prison run by the Khmer Rouge communist government. “There are so many dead people here. The neighbors are too weak to bury all the corpses. Often the bodies are left in the hot sun, until the smell permeates the surrounding air, causing everyone passing by to pinch their noses.”—Loung Ung, First They Killed My Father

It’s worth noting that as a failed social ideology and economic theory, communism resulted in the deaths (and in many cases murders) of over 94 million people in the 20th century, according to Information is Beautiful. Proponents of communism also murdered tens of thousands of people in South America and Africa, and displaced millions more.

In the Black Book of Communism, historian Martin Malia suggests a death toll between 85 and 100 million people.

As reported on TheWrap, this isn’t the first time that a BuzzFeed employee has been criticized for expressing open sympathies for the ideology. In November, BuzzFeed reporter Blake Montgomery slammed the White House for memorializing the victims of communism.

Montgomery called sympathies for the victims a “white nationalist talking point” and attacked President Trump for proclaiming the national day.

The reporter later backtracked on his remarks to state that he “didn’t mean in any way to diminish the many real victims of communism, and my tweet was a bad misinterpretation of the president’s declaration. I’ve deleted it.”

“I cover white nationalists, and they use that language a lot, which is why I made that very dumb mistake,” he claimed.

BuzzFeed editor-in-chief Ben Smith defended Montgomery, stating that Montgomery “very quickly apologized and explained, after some open convo on Twitter with Miriam Elder and others. Not sure what’s being asked here? Blood?”

It remains to be seen whether Oakes will do the same.

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Ian Miles Cheong is the managing editor of Human Events and owner of Hype Break. Subscribe to YouTube.com/HypeBreak for insightful analysis of games and criticism of game journalism and the culture surrounding video games.