Blood Meridian is factually the greatest American work of literature.

Blood Meridian is factually the greatest American work of literature.

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why does LULZ like this book so much?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      it's cool

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      The overrated Trifecta of LULZ "literature" seems to be this book, BOTNS and infinite jest, all of which are below 7/10 books.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        BOTNS?

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Book of The New Sun

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Blood on the Neeger Store.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        dr seuss runnin the joint

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      The detached perspective and descriptions read like a movie. They probably like the violence as well

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Why does LULZ like this book so much?
      LULZ likes this because they are LULZ's retarded younger brother, and look up to us, but aren't at our level yet.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      the only one they've read

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I have no idea what LULZ likes or why but this book just fucking rocks. It's a brutal, aesthetic feast with some dips into profundity.

      it's cool

      sums it up

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Because they like LULZ.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      because they go back and forth about who could make a proper film adaptation when in reality it can't and won't be done.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >muh violence

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    The Adventures of Augie March is better.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Canadian novel

      this book was very aimless on reread. Moby Dick still gets my vote for greatest American novel, it at least had a raison d'etre in the form of a whale named Moby Dick.

      A Feature is not a flaw. Nor the expectations from late 20th century fiction the same as middle 19th century.

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    this book was very aimless on reread. Moby Dick still gets my vote for greatest American novel, it at least had a raison d'etre in the form of a whale named Moby Dick.

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It sets mostly in Mexico.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      so is book not American because it is sets in Mexico?

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >A major theme is the warlike nature of man. Critic Harold Bloom praised Blood Meridian as one of the best 20th century American novels, "worthy of Herman Melville's Moby-Dick," but admitted that his "first two attempts to read through Blood Meridian failed, because [he] flinched from the overwhelming carnage".
    this is the person whose opinion you are following

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    kys

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    1) Moby-Dick
    2) The prose is a literary sleep aid.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >sleep aid
      Literally the cetology chapters. Moby dick suckers are hypocrites. BM never gets as boring despite the deliberate repetitions of its middle body.

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous
  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Any book written after the 60s cannot be good

  10. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    reddit

  11. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    No, it's the 2nd greatest.
    Moby Dick is automatically better because of how much BM derrives from it.

  12. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    agreed. the judge is one of the most captivating characters ever written

  13. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    and then you read your second piece of American literature

  14. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    if the whale represents God or nature, what does the judge represent?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      he represents the whale (is big, fat and weird)

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        compelling points and yet the fact that he doesn't explicitly swim or destroy boats with his jaws like scissor makes me think that maybe h
        e represents something other than just Moby Dick

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          he's also very white, a thing to consider, and kills a lot of people

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            good point, but moby dick doesn't take pleasure in killing them

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              how do you know? Other whales just run away, he must be getting something out of killing
              also at the end everybody is dead because of him and he lives to kill another day, can't be a coincidence

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              Or does he?

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          No he clearly represents the BOOK Moby Dick, and Glanton's Gang represent various aspects (AKA personalities) of McCarthy's mind while he was reading and trying to understand Moby Dick (the book).

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            No he represents the BOOK Blood Meridian. BM is highly self-referential (many books about this) and the narrator of the book shares with Holden diction, interest in geology and plants and similar ambiguous word games. The narrator also behaves like a slavering fanboy whenever Holden is on the page.

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              Wrong, he quite obviously represents the MAN Cormac McCarthy because Cormac wishes he was perfect in doing all the things he loves to write about (science, violence, getting strange, being inscrutable). So Judge Holden is a power fantasy-self insert.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                This is partially true. But Holden is an enigma and was designed to never be fully interpreted. He is WHOLLY OTHER, which Mckenna said is the experience of observing God within reality, on LSD. LSD triggers the language centers of the brain and reveals the underlying patterns of our understanding. McCarthy has described mystical experiences (when on LSD) as "direct apprehension of reality unmediated by symbol". I think it shows in his language, BM is a self consciously anti-symbolic work.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                That's a really interesting response, I didn't expect you to actually take mine seriously lol, but while we're here you said "this is partially true." What do you mean? Are you saying that Cormac wishes he was God or thinks he's God?

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                I think Judge Holden is the Platonic ideal of Cormac McCarthy. Everything that interests Holden interests McCarthy. Science, philosophy, language, violence etc. Do you know that McCarthy was a very talented Painter when he was about 8-10 years old?
                I don't think Holden is God btw. I mean Terrence isn't really an unmistakable authority on everything. It is after all his interpretation of the mystical experience.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Terrence is the platonic ideal of a charlatan

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      he represents a human who has mastered the unique ability of humans - knowledge/language - and uses it to the fullest extent

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        but he does magic and is immortal, he's not completely human now is he?

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          The human who masters knowledge and language ceases to be human and then becomes suzerain

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          he never does magic. what are you referring to? and only in his words is he immortal. part of what makes him such a terrifying character is that everything he does, while amazing, is technically possible and believable.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            he does magic tricks with a coin iirc. nothing supernatural though

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              i'm referring to him throwing the coin out of the camp and then it returning to him, i think its near the "war" monologue

              he explains that while he is doing it. not supernatural magic, a trick.
              >the arc of circling bodies is determined by the length of their tether

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                what tether? he literally chucks the coin out of sight and returns it to him that shits magic

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                if you're not trolling, go read chapter 17 again, the context of the trick is also important.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'm not trolling, the wording is explicitly ambiguous also just because there is some logic does not discount some sort of supernatural force

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                It is explicitly not ambiguous. Go read the chapter again, then come back.
                Getting sidetracked here anyway - is that your only evidence that the judge is inhuman? Flimsy at best.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                >is that your only evidence that the judge is inhuman? Flimsy at best.
                my argument is not that he is inhuman, my argument is that he represents some concept or idea which is outright explicit in the text, what concept is left up to interpretation, for you what is the judge is my question

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                I believe the judge is much too complex a character to be reduced down to just being a personification of war or something. For me, he represents a theoretical human that has mastered being a human and that representation is used to explore themes of violence, authority, history and more.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Interesting

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                >only evidence
                I haven't read the book in a long time, but doesn't the ending say something about him not having aged a day despite the 20+ year timeskip?

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                I will fully admit the last chapter kind of throws a wrench in my theory and I still struggle to understand it fully.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Post-timeskip Judge is clearly supernatural since he can also read the Kid's mind, but that can easily be explained as him being a "mere" figment of the Kid's imagination at that instance.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'm not trolling, the wording is explicitly ambiguous also just because there is some logic does not discount some sort of supernatural force

                Do you genuinely believe someone like the judge is incapable of slight of hand?

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            i'm referring to him throwing the coin out of the camp and then it returning to him, i think its near the "war" monologue

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      The gnostic demiurge

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        the demiurge wants people to suffer, they cant suffer if they are dead

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I've thought a lot about it myself and I think it's extremely likely he represents My Dick. Think about it: He's big, fat, white, tall, and unyielding, oh and there's literally nothing he cannot do perfectly. This should be obvious to you.

  15. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm not sure I'd go so far as to say "the greatest," but it's definitely the sort of novel you only see once in a century.

  16. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why does LULZ like this book so much?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Cuz good book.

  17. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Correct opinion. Good post. Nice work OP.

  18. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    The trinity is the greatest of American literature

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Incorrect

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Incorrect

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Demonstrably wrong

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Wrong

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              Wrong

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Erroneous

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Mistaken, retarded, gay, potentially even illiterate

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Laughably false on all accounts

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                IQ score @ freezing point (Fahrenheit)

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Wrong

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Then demonstrate it.

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              The demonstration is all around you. Look at the better trinity.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Marx, Engels and Gramsci?

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                No. King, McCarthy, Pynchon.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Who are they?

  19. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've read NCFOM and The Road, am I ready for Blood Meridian?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      You were ready before you even read page 1 of No Country, my sir

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        thanks lad

  20. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    crip meridian

  21. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >needlessly verbose descriptions of landscape
    >pause for simplistic dialogue from underwritten characters
    >something violent happens
    >the Judge acts like a capeshit character and monologues
    >rinse, repeat
    This is the entire book and it is dry and it is boring and it is formulaic and truly nothing special and full of little gimmicks for the lesser-read to either fawn or yawn for and there's truly only one character you can even call a character and unsurprisingly it's the only one people talk about and it is a book that is more praised for undeserved reputation than any acknowledgeable merit and one that serves as more conversational fodder that explores the history between McCarthy and film and as pointed out by others the fantastical debates of who would direct and who would write and who would play this and who would play that and it sucks. The Road is better.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >to either fawn or yawn for
      Fawn or yawn *over
      And you are calling yourself lesser-read by calling it boring. Paradoxical.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >underwritten characters
      what an odd complaint. who? the judge, the kid, glanton, tobin, toadvine, davy, black jackson all have plenty going on and most of the rest of them die more or less immediately.
      this isn't a novel about characters anyway, and the narrator not being omniscient is used to explore the theme of being witnessed

      it's also presented so that you're supposed to feel like a part of the gang - the narrator isn't the kid, but the reader takes on the same role as him

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >needlessly verbose descriptions of landscape
      >needlessly
      Filtered

  22. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Them's four things that can destroy the world: Women, whiskey, money, and naggers

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      truer words have never been written

  23. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I newly discovered that Michael Sugrue has a lecture on the book in Bibliotheca's Classics revisited series. If you dislike Amy Hungerford or Yale or both, this is really nice.

    The Classics revisited series is awesome in general.

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