64 thoughts on “Are wool beanies better than synthetics? Just ordered the black one off amazon for $12ish.

  1. Anonymous says:

    >Are wool beanies better than synthetics?
    yes
    >why?
    t-they just are, ok?
    personally I don’t like synthetic beanies because they feel really bad on my ears, but I never bothered to find why

    • Anonymous says:

      to clarify on what this:

      means, it’ll be way easier to run hot on a synthetic beanie

      gram for gram, wool will be both warmer in colder weather and you won’t need to immediately take it off when it gets hotter

      source: comparison between a super cheap wool beanie and a carhartt wip acrylic one (was a gift, i swear)

      • Anonymous says:

        gram for gram polyester is objectively warmer than merino wool so you’re smoking crack or didn’t weigh your hats and one’s thicker

  2. Anonymous says:

    I’m always going to rock a natural fiber over a synthetic if I can help it if it’s directly against my skin. I just ordered a USGI (supposedly) 100% wool watch cap from mcguirearmynavy dot com

  3. Anonymous says:

    Wool stays consistent for longer and you don’t have to wash it as much as synthetics.
    Synthetics are going to start changing, usually for the worse, the more you wear it and wash it.

  4. Anonymous says:

    I ditched all of my synthetic fleece caps for wool when I discovered these. They’re warmer than fleece, don’t shed estrogenic fibers, and are better-looking imo.

    • Anonymous says:

      >don’t shed estrogenic fibers
      Honestly this sounds like conspiracy theory levels of stuff until you actually start reading biochemistry papers and realize this shit is real. Just inhaling the fluff from your polyester scarf or beanie increases estrogen uptake… It sounds so dumb, but unfortunately it’s true. It’s not like you can ever escape all these microplastics, but if you can just reduce the intake, that’s already something.

      Wool is better, unfortunately it can be more expensive.

      • Anonymous says:

        definitely true for loose woven or piled garments especially fleeces.
        with tight woven garments most of the health risk is garment gets disposed of –> animal/fish eats plastic -> eventually gets to humans in the food chain -> increases xenoestrogen levels
        the garment itself won’t directly affect you but its existence in the long run will heck over people in the future.
        also per year right now for the last few years 30-40% of all foreign packages entering the united states come from 2 companies shien and temu. the overwhelming majority of that being plastic women’s fast fashion clothing.

      • Anonymous says:

        definitely true for loose woven or piled garments especially fleeces.
        with tight woven garments most of the health risk is garment gets disposed of –> animal/fish eats plastic -> eventually gets to humans in the food chain -> increases xenoestrogen levels
        the garment itself won’t directly affect you but its existence in the long run will heck over people in the future.
        also per year right now for the last few years 30-40% of all foreign packages entering the united states come from 2 companies shien and temu. the overwhelming majority of that being plastic women’s fast fashion clothing.

        how is the "gym polyester" compared to fleece?
        also everybody wear hoodies and all hoodies have fleece lining so we are kinda hecked

          • Anonymous says:

            I realized everything I’m wearing right now has synthetic materials, mostly poly/cotton blend and acrylic.

            yes its ubiquitous

            […]
            how is the "gym polyester" compared to fleece?
            also everybody wear hoodies and all hoodies have fleece lining so we are kinda hecked

            how bad polyester is for the environment depends on how its woven or arranged. if its a tight weave and you wear the garment for a long time before discarding it, or even repurpose the fabric after, then its environmental impact isn’t that big. if you’re say a hiker wearing a high pile fleece traveling near remote waterways and shedding polyester fibers everywhere you go, that’s really bad for the environment.
            once it hits the landfill all polyester is bad.
            the gray pill here is that 99% of the polyester problem is caused by women’s fast fashion. 30-40% of packages entering the united states from overseas come from shein and temu. if you’re a dude there’s realistically not a whole lot of impact you can have beyond shaming women, zoomers, and poors for participating in this destructive peak late stage consoooomerism.
            polyester isn’t bad used responsibly. give it a long life, repair your garments, avoid disposable garbage like membranes and gore tex and your impact isn’t that bad.
            all from the perspective of an ochem sperg anon who doesn’t buy into global warming shit.

        • Anonymous says:

          You can get 100% cotton sweatshirts and pants, fleecing is just the brushing of the interior fabric with a machine to make it all soft and fluffy. Brave Star makes my favorite hoodies and crewnecks right now, super heavy and all cotton.

      • Anonymous says:

        it’s warm and fits well and is pretty good quality for what you’re paying for, definitely kept me warmer than any other acrylic/poly hats

  5. Anonymous says:

    they’re both good for technical hiking/outdoors use
    for fashion use yeah wool is just flat out better than synthetic
    if you’re sensitive to the itchiness of wool or if you’re allergic to lanolin buy higher grade wools and seek out wools made from a hypoallergenic, non-barbed fiber animal like alpaca cashmere bison etc.
    if you’re not merino is the value king.

  6. Anonymous says:

    yes wool is better than synthetic. it insulates better and doesn’t retain water so it’s good for snow. it’s also not expensive since it’s so common, so might as well get it unless you’re allergic

    • Anonymous says:

      synthetic actually insulates better than most common wools like merino.
      but some wools are way warmer than synthetic.
      depends what kind and how its processed + woven.

      • Anonymous says:

        that’s true, I’m not aware what wools are better though. how does alpaca wool do? I’m aware it stretches and doesn’t retract as well as other kinds but that’s it

        • Anonymous says:

          the highest end stuff is:
          giga rich luxury: vicuña
          everyone else luxury: cashmere
          rugged/performance american: bison
          rugged/performance non american: qiviut
          rugged/performance value: yak
          storm proof / outer layer: coarse sheep/lamb wools europe has the best shit imo
          allergies: alpaca
          value: merino

          alpaca is going to be more technically performant than a standard merino wool on most metrics but its not going to be as mechanically durable or last as long.
          american bison and qiviut is going to be the best of both worlds between them, and warmer than both. but with some downsides: cost, regional availability, limited production/not many garments made in it, not suitable for thinner garments etc.

          • Anonymous says:

            I have some bison socks from united by blue. They shrunk a lot, thye’re scratchy as hell, and they’re not that warm.

          • Anonymous says:

            its not a good material for socks or thinner garments in general
            >and they’re not that warm
            its one of the warmest wools on the planet lol

  7. Anonymous says:

    >they’re both good for technical hiking/outdoors use
    a wool beanie will keep working longer as it gets wet
    a synthetic beanie will dry out significantly faster if it gets wet
    trade-off & which one is better depends on what you’re doing.
    synthetic is warmer per fabric weight than most wools but higher end wools like muskox bison etc will be warmer than synthetic. the thickness of the hat is what matters more tho.

  8. Anonymous says:

    Synthetics are suffocating and do not allow any perspiration to escape. I wear almost no synthetics, and if I do, they are outerwear that does not touch my skin. Also, wool is king in budget warmth retention during winter.

  9. Anonymous says:

    Wool is always better than synthetics except in the case of being water/wind proof, but synthetic beanies are neither of those things anyways. Wool is warmer, lasts longer, breathes better, and still insulates when wet. It also easily decomposes without polluting the environment when you throw it out, if you care about that sort of thing.

  10. Anonymous says:

    I wonder whose face they molded those foam heads after. I had some I used for shooting in my backyard. I wonder how he would feel about me shooting his likeness.

  11. Anonymous says:

    Got mine in the mail today. smelled weird. hand washed it a few times and a lot of dye came out.

    Noticed there were fibers everywhere. Is it normal for wool to do this?

    • Anonymous says:

      could be cheap bullshit or you could have washed them too aggressively. i’m leaning towards cheap bullshit because good wool smells pleasant.
      take a look at my wool gloves

      https://i.imgur.com/W7L9ZeU.jpg

      the highest end stuff is:
      giga rich luxury: vicuña
      everyone else luxury: cashmere
      rugged/performance american: bison
      rugged/performance non american: qiviut
      rugged/performance value: yak
      storm proof / outer layer: coarse sheep/lamb wools europe has the best shit imo
      allergies: alpaca
      value: merino

      alpaca is going to be more technically performant than a standard merino wool on most metrics but its not going to be as mechanically durable or last as long.
      american bison and qiviut is going to be the best of both worlds between them, and warmer than both. but with some downsides: cost, regional availability, limited production/not many garments made in it, not suitable for thinner garments etc.

      i’ve been wearing them every fall every weekend to cut trees and do volunteer forestry type stuff since 2008, 15 years. that’s how high quality wool holds up to abuse.

      […]
      how is the "gym polyester" compared to fleece?
      also everybody wear hoodies and all hoodies have fleece lining so we are kinda hecked

      if it could shed polyester fibers while worn or in the wash before the garment is discarded, its bad for the environment. anything with that piled or bushed texture is bad.

      >doesn’t retain water
      yes it does, wool absorbs moisture but still keeps warm

      this is partially true but people misinterpret what it actually means.
      wool stays warmER than synthetics when its partially saturated. it still loses warmth just not as much.
      once saturated both synthetics and wools provide the same amount of warmth: basically none.

  12. Anonymous says:

    If you are just wearing it for fashion like 99% of you gays, then it doesn’t matter. For colder climates it actually matters a little, but for actual cold climates there are much better headwear choices.

    • Anonymous says:

      What’s better? I was also considering a sherpa lined cap, but those are synthetic.

      >government issue
      >made to department of defense specification
      so the cheapest, shittiest, quality? lmao

      Seems ok to me. Warm and comfy.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *